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Frederick A. Boop

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Kyu-Chang Wang

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Chang Sub Lee, Ji Hoon Phi, Seung-Ki Kim, Byung-Kyu Cho and Kyu-Chang Wang

Object

Congenital dermal sinus (CDS) usually develops in the midline of the body as a single tract. To date, only a few patients with multiple CDS tracts and ostia have been reported. The authors analyzed the clinical features of patients with spinal CDS and multiple ostia and proposed a novel hypothesis for the pathogenesis of the atypical CDS.

Methods

Five patients with spinal CDS and multiple ostia were included. The clinical, radiological, and operative features of these patients were reviewed retrospectively.

Results

Three patients demonstrated bilateral paramedian ostia at the same or a very similar spinal level. One patient showed a paramedian and a midline ostium. One patient had 2 unilateral paramedian ostia at different spinal levels. The layers of the internal ending of CDS tracts were diverse. Complete removal of the tracts was possible in all patients. Two patients had dermoid tumors. All patients had an associated anomaly, such as a lumbosacral lipoma or the Currarino triad. The authors propose a “zipping error” hypothesis for the formation of dual ostia located at the spinal level of primary neurulation. An associated anomaly such as a lumbosacral lipoma may contribute to the formation of dual ostia.

Conclusions

Unilateral or bilateral dual ostia may be present in patients with CDS, especially when an associated anomaly is present. The atypical CDS may develop from aberrant neural tube closure.

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Hyunho Choi, Ji Yeoun Lee, Ji Hoon Phi, Seung-Ki Kim, Byung-Kyu Cho and Kyu-Chang Wang

Object

Postoperative epidural hematoma (EDH), a blood collection between the inserted galeal flap and the overlying skull flap (epigaleal flap hematoma), is a frustrating complication of the surgical treatment of moyamoya disease (MMD) in pediatric patients. The symptoms of postoperative EDH are often similar to those of postoperative cerebral ischemia, and may cause confusion during clinical decision making. The authors designed this study to evaluate the incidence, clinical presentation, risk factors, and treatment outcomes of postoperative EDH in pediatric patients with MMD.

Methods

A retrospective review of 148 pediatric patients with 250 craniotomies who underwent indirect bypass revascularization surgery between January 2002 and December 2006 was performed. This group consisted of 60 male and 88 female patients, and the mean age at surgery was 7.5 years (range 1–18 years).

Results

Of the 250 craniotomies, postoperative EDH was detected in 32 cases. In 12 cases of EDH, surgical treatment was necessary (4.8% of 250 craniotomies). During the same period, 743 non-MMD craniotomy operations were performed. In 6 of these 743 operations, patients developed postoperative EDH that required surgical treatment, significantly less than the percentage of EDH requiring postoperative treatment in patients with MMD (0.8%, p < 0.001). The average interval between craniotomy surgery and the detection of EDH was 1.8 days (range 0–5 days) in patients with MMD and 0.5 days (range 0–2 days; p = 0.018) in the non-MMD craniotomy group.

Postoperative EDH was observed in significantly fewer cases (17 of 191) when a subcutaneous drain (SCD) was inserted over the bone flap than in cases in which an SCD was not inserted (14 of 55; p = 0.001). The mean international normalized ratio of prothrombin time in the immediate postoperative blood test was 1.27 ± 0.17 in the EDH group and 1.20 ± 0.11 in the non-EDH group (values are expressed as the mean ± SD; p = 0.008). Central galeal flap tenting suture and immediate postoperative platelet count were not related to the incidence of postoperative EDH following pediatric MMD surgery.

Conclusions

Postoperative EDH is more likely to be found following craniotomy in patients with MMD than in those without MMD, and may occur in a delayed fashion. Insertion of an SCD and immediate correction of an abnormal value for international normalized ratio of prothrombin time can decrease the incidence of postoperative EDH following surgery for pediatric MMD.

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Ji-Woong Kwon, Byung-Kyu Cho, Eui Chong Kim, Kyu-Chang Wang and Seung-Ki Kim

A 13-year-old girl exhibited rapid deterioration in mental status 15 days after surgery for craniopharyngioma. Serial CT scanning detected progression of a low-density lesion on the left frontotemporal lobe. The serum level of C-reactive protein was elevated and polymerase chain reaction identified herpes simplex virus DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid. Antiviral therapy with high-dose acyclovir (10 mg/kg 3 times daily) was begun. She recovered and could speak short sentences, but dysphasia and right hemiparesis remained. Early diagnosis and active treatment of herpes simplex encephalitis is essential for improving prognosis and saving lives.

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Won-Sang Cho, Seung-Ki Kim, Kyu-Chang Wang, Ji Hoon Phi and Byung-Kyu Cho

Intracystic bleomycin (ICB) administration is known to be effective in the treatment of cystic craniopharyngiomas (CRPs) and rarely causes serious complications. The authors report a case of vasculopathy after ICB injection for a recurrent cystic CRP. A 5-year-old boy presented with the cystic recurrence of a CRP. A catheter and Ommaya system were inserted into the cyst, followed by a leakage test 2 weeks later. Bleomycin was delivered at 3 mg per week for 14 weeks (total dose 42 mg). Four months later, the patient's activity decreased and right hemiparesis occurred. Magnetic resonance imaging and cerebral angiography demonstrated a recurrent multicystic mass and infarction at the left middle cerebral artery territory with stenosis/occlusion of the left distal internal carotid artery and posterior cerebral artery. During the operation to remove the recurrent cystic mass, fibrotic stenoocclusion of the left intracranial arteries was identified. The cyst was totally removed. However, additional multiple border zone infarctions occurred in the left hemisphere, and the patient became wheelchair bound. Leakage of ICB was considered as the most probable cause of the cerebral vasculopathy and corresponding infarction. A leakage test may not always guarantee a leakage-free status even if the test is negative. Direct bypass surgery should have been considered to prevent a high risk of postoperative infarction in this case of a recurrent CRP with confirmed vasculopathy.

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Ho Jun Seol, Kyu-Chang Wang, Seung-Ki Kim, Yong-Seung Hwang, Ki Joong Kim and Byung-Kyu Cho

Object

Patients with moyamoya disease complain of headache before surgery, after surgery, or in both periods. To clarify the pathophysiological features of these headaches which are one of the major symptoms in moyamoya disease after indirect bypass surgery, the authors reviewed data obtained in patients with moyamoya disease who underwent such surgery at their institute.

Methods

The authors surveyed 204 children with moyamoya disease younger than 17 years of age who underwent indirect bypass surgery consecutively between 1988 and 2000. If headache and associated symptoms disturbed their daily activity, required rest and/or medication, and occurred at least once a month, the headache was regarded as significant and the patient was included in the study. A postoperative headache was defined as the presence of significant headache 12 months after the operation or later. Preoperative headache was documented in 44 patients. Postoperative headache was observed in 63% (28 of 44) of the patients with preoperative headache and in 6.3% (10 of 160) of those without preoperative headache. Aggravation on postoperative magnetic resonance images or single-photon emission computerized tomography scans did not correlate with this symptom (p = 0.729 and 0.203, respectively). The clinical course had the following features: 1) a coexisting stage of headache and transient ischemic attack; 2) a second stage of headache only; and 3) a final stage of improvement or disappearance of headache.

Conclusions

The authors demonstrated that headaches can persist or develop after indirect bypass surgery despite successful prevention of cerebral ischemia. In addition to decreased cerebral blood flow, progressive recruitment and redistribution of blood flow should be considered as a cause of headaches in patients with moyamoya disease.

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Ji Hoon Phi, Seung-Ki Kim, Sung-Hye Park, Seok Ho Hong, Kyu-Chang Wang and Byung-Kyu Cho

Object

Immature teratomas of the central nervous system (CNS) are rare neoplasms. Although adjuvant therapy is generally recommended after resection, the exact role of each therapeutic modality is not yet established. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinicopathological correlation and the role of resection to define the optimal treatment modalities for immature teratomas of the CNS.

Methods

Between 1987 and 2002, eight patients underwent radical surgery for a lesion diagnosed as a CNS immature teratoma at the authors' institution. The clinical courses of these patients and the pathological features of their tumors were retrospectively reviewed.

Gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in six patients at the initial operation. The mean follow-up period was 75 months. Two patients received postoperative adjuvant therapies and two patients did not, against medical advice. None of the four patients experienced recurrence after long-term follow up. Another four patients, all of whom underwent GTR of the tumor, did not receive adjuvant therapy as part of a prospective treatment scheme. One of them exhibited early recurrence and metastasis. The tumor had pathological features denoting a high-grade (Norris Grade III) lesion and neurocytomatous differentiation.

Conclusions

Aggressive resection seems to be of utmost importance in the treatment of immature teratomas of the CNS. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be deferred if GTR is achieved in low-grade, immature teratomas, but adjuvant therapies may be warranted for high-grade ones.

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Haeng Jin Lee, Ji Hoon Phi, Seung-Ki Kim, Kyu-Chang Wang and Seong-Joon Kim

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to report the incidence of and the factors associated with papilledema in children with hydrocephalus.

METHODS

Patients younger than 15 years of age who had been diagnosed with hydrocephalus and treated by extra-ventricular drainage or ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery between 2005 and 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Factors including patient age and sex, etiology of hydrocephalus, duration of signs or symptoms, intracranial pressure (ICP), and presence of papilledema were evaluated.

RESULTS

Forty-six patients, whose mean age was 6.3 ± 4.7 years, were included in the study. The 19 patients without papilledema had a mean age of 2.7 ± 2.7 years, and the 27 patients with papilledema had a mean age of 8.8 ± 4.2 years (p < 0.001). The mean ICP was 19.9 ± 10.0 cm H2O among those without papilledema and 33.3 ± 9.1 cm H2O among those with papilledema (p < 0.001). The mean duration of signs or symptoms was 3.0 ± 4.6 months in the patients without papilledema and 3.4 ± 3.9 months in those with papilledema (p = 0.704). The patients with papilledema were older and presented with higher ICP than those without. The causes of hydrocephalus were tumor (59%), congenital anomaly (19%), hemorrhage (13%), and infection (9%).

CONCLUSIONS

Papilledema was more common in patients who were older, who had higher ICP, and whose hydrocephalus had been induced by brain tumor. However, since papilledema was absent in 41% of the children with hydrocephalus, papilledema's absence does not ensure the absence of hydrocephalus, especially in younger patients.