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Ben A. Strickland, Shane Shahrestani, Robert G. Briggs, Anna Jackanich, Sherwin Tavakol, Kyle Hurth, Mark S. Shiroishi, Chia-Shang J. Liu, John D. Carmichael, Martin Weiss, and Gabriel Zada

OBJECTIVE

Silent corticotroph adenomas (SCAs) are a distinct subtype of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFAs) that demonstrate positive immunohistochemistry for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) without causing Cushing’s disease. SCAs are hypothesized to exhibit more aggressive behavior than standard NFAs. The authors analyzed their institution’s surgical experience with SCAs in an effort to characterize rates of invasion, postoperative clinical outcomes, and patterns of disease recurrence and progression. The secondary objectives were to define the best treatment strategies in the event of tumor recurrence and progression.

METHODS

A retrospective analysis of patients treated at the authors’ institution identified 100 patients with SCAs and 841 patients with NFAs of other subtypes who were treated surgically from 2000 to 2019. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, surgical and neuroimaging data, rates of endocrinopathy, and neurological outcomes were recorded. Cohorts of patients with SCAs and patients with standard NFAs were compared with regard to these characteristics and outcomes.

RESULTS

The SCA cohort presented with cranial neuropathy (13% vs 5.7%, p = 0.0051) and headache (53% vs 42.3%, p = 0.042) compared to the NFA cohort, despite similar rates of apoplexy. The SCA cohort included a higher proportion of women (SCA 60% vs NFA 45.8%, p = 0.0071) and younger age at presentation (SCA 50.5 ± 13.3 vs NFA 54.6 ± 14.9 years of age, p = 0.0082). Reoperations were comparable between the cohorts (SCA 16% vs NFA 15.7%, p = 0.98). Preoperative pituitary function was comparable between the cohorts with the exception of higher rates of preoperative panhypopituitarism in NFA patients (2% vs 6.1%, respectively; p = 0.0033). The mean tumor diameter in SCA patients was 24 ± 10.8 mm compared to 26 ± 11.3 mm in NFA patients (p = 0.05). Rates of cavernous sinus invasion were higher in the SCA group (56% vs 49.7%), although this result did not reach statistical significance. There were no significant differences in extent of resection, intraoperative CSF leak rates, endocrine or neurological outcomes, or postoperative complications. Ki-67 rates were significantly increased in the SCA cohort (2.88 ± 2.79) compared to the NFA cohort (1.94 ± 1.99) (p = 0.015). Although no differences in overall rates of progression or recurrence were noted, SCAs had a significantly lower progression-free survival (24.5 vs 51.1 months, p = 0.0011). Among the SCA cohort, progression was noted despite the use of adjuvant radiosurgery in 33% (n = 4/12) of treated tumors. Adequate tumor control was not achieved in half (n = 6) of the SCA progression cohort despite radiosurgery or multiple resections.

CONCLUSIONS

In this study, to the authors’ knowledge the largest surgical series to assess outcomes in SCAs to date, the findings suggest that SCAs are more biologically aggressive tumors than standard NFAs. The progression-free survival duration of patients with SCAs is only about half that of patients with other NFAs. Therefore, close neuroimaging and clinical follow-up are warranted in patients with SCAs, and residual disease should be considered for early postoperative adjuvant radiosurgery, particularly in younger patients.

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Weijun Wang, Hee-Yeon Cho, Rachel Rosenstein-Sisson, Nagore I. Marín Ramos, Ryan Price, Kyle Hurth, Axel H. Schönthal, Florence M. Hofman, and Thomas C. Chen

OBJECTIVE

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent and the most aggressive of primary brain tumors. There is currently no effective treatment for this tumor. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is effective for a variety of tumors, but not for GBM. The authors' goal was to demonstrate that bortezomib can be effective in the orthotopic GBM murine model if the appropriate method of drug delivery is used. In this study the Alzet mini-osmotic pump was used to bring the drug directly to the tumor in the brain, circumventing the blood-brain barrier; thus making bortezomib an effective treatment for GBM.

METHODS

The 2 human glioma cell lines, U87 and U251, were labeled with luciferase and used in the subcutaneous and intracranial in vivo tumor models. Glioma cells were implanted subcutaneously into the right flank, or intracranially into the frontal cortex of athymic nude mice. Mice bearing intracranial glioma tumors were implanted with an Alzet mini-osmotic pump containing different doses of bortezomib. The Alzet pumps were introduced directly into the tumor bed in the brain. Survival was documented for mice with intracranial tumors.

RESULTS

Glioma cells were sensitive to bortezomib at nanomolar quantities in vitro. In the subcutaneous in vivo xenograft tumor model, bortezomib given intravenously was effective in reducing tumor progression. However, in the intracranial glioma model, bortezomib given systemically did not affect survival. By sharp contrast, animals treated with bortezomib intracranially at the tumor site exhibited significantly increased survival.

CONCLUSIONS

Bypassing the blood-brain barrier by using the osmotic pump resulted in an increase in the efficacy of bortezomib for the treatment of intracranial tumors. Thus, the intratumoral administration of bortezomib into the cranial cavity is an effective approach for glioma therapy.