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  • Author or Editor: Kristen O. Riley x
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Adeel Ilyas, Emilia Toth, Diana Pizarro, Kristen O. Riley and Sandipan Pati

The putative mechanism of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for medically refractory epilepsy is desynchronization of hippocampal and thalamocortical circuitry; however, the nature of the dose-response relationship and temporal dynamics is poorly understood. For greater elucidation, a study in a nonepileptic rat model was previously conducted and showed that rapid-cycle (RC) VNS achieved superior desynchrony compared to standard-cycle (SC) VNS. Here, the authors report on the first in-human analysis of the neuromodulatory dose-response effects of VNS in a patient with posttraumatic, independent, bilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy refractory to medications and SC-VNS who was referred as a potential candidate for a responsive neurostimulation device. During stereotactic electroencephalography (SEEG) recordings, the VNS device was initially turned off, then changed to SC-VNS and then RC-VNS settings. Spectral analysis revealed a global reduction of power in the theta (4–8 Hz) and alpha (8–15 Hz) bands with both SC- and RC-VNS compared to the stimulation off setting (p < 0.001). Furthermore, in the alpha band, both SC- and RC-VNS were associated with greater global desynchrony compared to the off setting (p < 0.001); and, specifically, in the bilateral epileptogenic hippocampi, RC-VNS further reduced spectral power compared to SC-VNS (p < 0.001). The dose-response and temporal effects suggest that VNS modulates regional and global dynamics differently.

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Lauren E. Rotman, T. Brooks Vaughan, James R. Hackney and Kristen O. Riley

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Jeffrey P. Blount, Jason Cormier, Hyunmi Kim, Pongkiat Kankirawatana, Kristen O. Riley and Robert C. Knowlton

Intracranial monitoring using electroencephalography (IC-EEG) continues to play a critical role in the assessment of patients with medically intractable localization-related epilepsy. There has been minimal change in grid or electrode design in the last 15–20 years, and the surgical approaches for implantation are unchanged. Intracranial monitoring using EEG allows detailed definition of the region of ictal onset and defines the epileptogenic zone, particularly with regard to adjacent potentially eloquent tissue. Recent developments of IC-EEG include the coregistration of functional imaging data such as magnetoencephalography to the frameless navigation systems. Despite significant inherent limitations that are often overlooked, IC-EEG remains the gold standard for localization of the epileptogenic cortex. Intracranial electrodes take a variety of different forms and may be placed either in the subdural (subdural strips and grids, depth electrodes) or extradural spaces (sphenoidal, peg, and epidural electrodes). Each form has its own advantages and shortcomings but extensive subdural implantation of electrodes is most common and is most comprehensively discussed. The indications for intracranial electrodes are reviewed.