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Kathryn Wagner, Francisco Vaz-Guimaraes, Kevin Camstra and Sandi Lam

OBJECTIVE

Appropriately chosen candidates with medically refractory epilepsy may benefit from hemispheric disconnection. Traditionally, this involves a large surgical exposure with significant associated morbidity. Minimally invasive approaches using endoscopic assistance have been described by only a few centers. Here, the authors report on the feasibility of endoscope-assisted functional hemispherotomy in a cadaver model and its first translation into clinical practice in appropriately selected patients.

METHODS

Three silicone-injected, formalin-fixed cadaver heads were used to establish the steps of the procedure in the laboratory. The steps of disconnection were performed using standard surgical instruments and a straight endoscope. The technique was then applied in two patients who had been referred for hemispherectomy and had favorable anatomy for an endoscope-assisted approach.

RESULTS

All disconnections were performed in the cadaver model via a 4 × 2–cm paramedian keyhole craniotomy using endoscopic assistance. An additional temporal burr hole approach was marked in case the authors were unable to completely visualize the frontobasal and insular cuts from the paramedian vertical view. Their protocol was subsequently used successfully in two pediatric patients. Full disconnection was verified with postoperative tractography.

CONCLUSIONS

Full hemispheric disconnection can be accomplished with minimally invasive endoscope-assisted functional hemispherotomy. The procedure is technically feasible and can be safely applied in patients with favorable anatomy and pathology; it may lead to less surgical morbidity and faster recovery.

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Visish M. Srinivasan, Stephen R. Chen, Kevin M. Camstra, Gouthami Chintalapani and Peter Kan

OBJECTIVE

Stroke is a major cause of disability and death in adults. Several large randomized clinical trials have shown the significant benefit of mechanical thrombectomy with modern stent retrievers in the treatment of large-vessel occlusions. However, large clots located at bifurcations remain challenging to treat. An in vivo model of these recalcitrant clots needs to be developed to test future generations of devices.

METHODS

Autologous blood was drawn from anesthetized swine via a femoral sheath. Blood was then mixed with thrombin, calcium chloride, and saline, and injected into silicone tubing to form cylindrical clots in the standard fashion. Matured clots were then delivered in an unfragmented fashion directly into the distal extracranial vasculature, at branch points where vessel sizes mimic the human middle cerebral artery, by using Penumbra aspiration tubing and the Penumbra ACE68 reperfusion catheter.

RESULTS

A total of 5 adult swine were used to develop the model. The techniques evolved during experiments in the first 3 animals, and the last 2 were used to establish the final model. In these 2 swine, a total of 8 autologous clots, 15–20 mm, were injected directly into 8 distal extracranial vessels at branch points to mimic a bifurcation occlusion in a human. All clots were delivered directly at a distal bifurcation or trifurcation in an unfragmented fashion to cause an occlusion. Ten revascularization attempts were made, and none of the branch-point occlusions were fully revascularized on the first attempt.

CONCLUSIONS

Using novel large-bore distal access catheters, large unfragmented clots can be delivered into distal extracranial vessels in a swine occlusion model. The model mimics the clinical situation of a recalcitrant bifurcation occlusion and will be valuable in the study of next-generation stroke devices and in training settings.

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Kathryn Wagner, Francisco Vaz-Guimaraes, Kevin Camstra and Sandi Lam

OBJECTIVE

Appropriately chosen candidates with medically refractory epilepsy may benefit from hemispheric disconnection. Traditionally, this involves a large surgical exposure with significant associated morbidity. Minimally invasive approaches using endoscopic assistance have been described by only a few centers. Here, the authors report on the feasibility of endoscope-assisted functional hemispherotomy in a cadaver model and its first translation into clinical practice in appropriately selected patients.

METHODS

Three silicone-injected, formalin-fixed cadaver heads were used to establish the steps of the procedure in the laboratory. The steps of disconnection were performed using standard surgical instruments and a straight endoscope. The technique was then applied in two patients who had been referred for hemispherectomy and had favorable anatomy for an endoscope-assisted approach.

RESULTS

All disconnections were performed in the cadaver model via a 4 × 2–cm paramedian keyhole craniotomy using endoscopic assistance. An additional temporal burr hole approach was marked in case the authors were unable to completely visualize the frontobasal and insular cuts from the paramedian vertical view. Their protocol was subsequently used successfully in two pediatric patients. Full disconnection was verified with postoperative tractography.

CONCLUSIONS

Full hemispheric disconnection can be accomplished with minimally invasive endoscope-assisted functional hemispherotomy. The procedure is technically feasible and can be safely applied in patients with favorable anatomy and pathology; it may lead to less surgical morbidity and faster recovery.