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Doris D. Wang, Kenneth W. Martin, Kurtis I. Auguste and Peter P. Sun

Disorders of CSF dynamics such as syringomyelia and obstructive hydrocephalus can be caused by thin mobile obstructive lesions not visible on traditional MRI sequences. New imaging techniques with balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) and dynamic imaging with bSSFP cine allow visualization of these pulsatile structures within the CSF space. The authors present 2 cases involving pediatric patients—one who developed presumed idiopathic syringomyelia and one with presumed communicating hydrocephalus in association with Pfeiffer syndrome—who harbored thin dynamic obstructive lesions seen on bSSFP cine studies using 1.5-T MRI.

In combination with traditional CSF cine studies and bSSFP, bSSFP cine sequence was able to detect dynamic membranous adhesions not seen on traditional MRI sequences. These previously undetectable lesions on traditional MRI sequences were the etiology of CSF obstruction, and tailored surgical approaches were performed to avoid shunting in both patients. These reports demonstrate the clinical utility for using these novel imaging tools for the detection of thin adhesions and dynamic lesions in the central nervous system. Balanced SSFP cine sequences can supplement conventional MR modalities to identify these otherwise poorly visualized lesions responsible for presumed communicating hydrocephalus or idiopathic syringomyelia.

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Darryl Lau, Cecilia L. Dalle Ore, Kenneth W. Martin, James F. Policy and Peter P. Sun

Pedicle aplasia is an uncommon congenital anomaly most frequently involving the absence of a single pedicle at a single vertebral level. Bilateral pedicle aplasia at multiple levels is exceedingly rare and has only been described once previously in the literature. While single-level pedicle aplasia is often asymptomatic and discovered incidentally, pedicle aplasia of multiple levels may produce severe spinal deformities and neurological deficits. Due to the rarity of this condition, optimal management remains uncertain. In this case report, the authors describe the surgical management of a healthy 9-year-old boy who presented with frequent falls, difficulty running, and severe thoracic kyphotic deformity and was found to have bilateral pedicle aplasia from T3 to T9. A review of the literature regarding pedicle aplasia is also presented.

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Darryl Lau, Cecilia L. Dalle Ore, Kenneth W. Martin, James F. Policy and Peter P. Sun

Pedicle aplasia is an uncommon congenital anomaly most frequently involving the absence of a single pedicle at a single vertebral level. Bilateral pedicle aplasia at multiple levels is exceedingly rare and has only been described once previously in the literature. While single-level pedicle aplasia is often asymptomatic and discovered incidentally, pedicle aplasia of multiple levels may produce severe spinal deformities and neurological deficits. Due to the rarity of this condition, optimal management remains uncertain. In this case report, the authors describe the surgical management of a healthy 9-year-old boy who presented with frequent falls, difficulty running, and severe thoracic kyphotic deformity and was found to have bilateral pedicle aplasia from T3 to T9. A review of the literature regarding pedicle aplasia is also presented.

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Oral Presentations

2010 AANS Annual Meeting Philadelphia, Pennsylvania May 1–5, 2010