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Koichi Miki, Hiroshi Abe, Takashi Morishita, Shuji Hayashi, Kenji Yagi, Hisatomi Arima, and Tooru Inoue

OBJECTIVE

Subdural hygroma has been reported as a causative factor in the development of a chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) following a head trauma and/or neurosurgical procedure. In some CSDH cases, the presence of a 2-layered space delineated by the same or similar density of CSF surrounded by a superficial, residual hematoma is seen on CT imaging after evacuation of the hematoma. The aims of the present study were to test the hypothesis that the double-crescent sign (DCS), a unique imaging finding described here, is associated with the postoperative recurrence of CSDH, and to investigate other factors that are related to CSDH recurrence.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively analyzed data from 278 consecutive patients who underwent single burr-hole surgery for CSDH between April 2012 and March 2017. The DCS was defined as a postoperative CT finding, characterized by the following 2 layers: a superficial layer demonstrating residual hematoma after evacuation of the CSDH, and a deep layer between the brain’s surface and the residual hematoma, depicted as a low-density space. Correlation of the recurrence of CSDH with the DCS was evaluated by multivariate logistic regression modeling. The authors also investigated other classic predictive factors including age, sex, past history of head injury, hematoma laterality, anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy administration, preoperative hematoma volume, postoperative residual hematoma volume, and postoperative brain reexpansion rate.

RESULTS

A total of 277 patients (320 hemispheres) were reviewed. Fifty (18.1%) of the 277 patients experienced recurrence of CSDH within 3 months of surgery. CSDH recurred within 3 months of surgery in 32 of the 104 hemispheres with a positive DCS. Multivariate logistic analyses revealed that the presence of the DCS (OR 3.36, 95% CI 1.72–6.57, p < 0.001), large postoperative residual hematoma volume (OR 2.88, 95% CI 1.24–6.71, p = 0.014), anticoagulant therapy (OR 3.03, 95% CI 1.02–9.01, p = 0.046), and bilateral hematoma (OR 3.57, 95% CI 1.79–7.13, p < 0.001) were significant, independent predictors of CSDH recurrence.

CONCLUSIONS

In this study, the authors report that detection of the DCS within 7 days of surgery is an independent predictive factor for CSDH recurrence. They therefore advocate that clinicians should carefully monitor patients for postoperative DCS and subsequent CSDH recurrence.

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Kenji Yagi, Hiroshi Nakagawa, Toshiyuki Okazaki, Shinsuke Irie, Toru Inagaki, Osamu Saito, Shinji Nagahiro, and Koji Saito

OBJECTIVE

Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) procedures are performed to treat patients with cervical myelopathy or radiculopathy. Dysphagia is a post-ACDF complication. When it coincides with prevertebral space enlargement and inflammation, surgical site infection and pharyngoesophageal perforation must be considered. The association between dysphagia and prevertebral inflammation has not been reported. The authors investigated factors eliciting severe dysphagia and its relationship with prevertebral inflammation in patients who had undergone ACDF.

MATERIALS

The clinical data of 299 patients who underwent 307 ACDF procedures for cervical radiculopathy or myelopathy at Kushiro Kojinkai Memorial Hospital and Kushiro Neurosurgical Hospital between December 2007 and August 2014 were reviewed.

RESULTS

After 7 ACDF procedures (2.3%), 7 patients suffered severe prolonged and/or delayed dysphagia and odynophagia that prevented ingestion. In all 7 patients the prevertebral space was enlarged. In 5 (1.6%) the symptom was thought to be associated with prevertebral soft-tissue edema; in all 5 an inflammatory response, hyperthermia, and an increase in the white blood cell count and in C-reactive protein level was observed. After 2 procedures (0.7%), we noted prevertebral hematoma without an inflammatory response. None of the patients who had undergone 307 ACDF procedures manifested pharyngoesophageal perforation or surgical site infection.

CONCLUSIONS

Severe dysphagia and odynophagia are post-ACDF complications. In most instances they are attributable to prevertebral soft-tissue edema accompanied by inflammatory responses such as fever and an increase in the white blood cell count and in C-reactive protein. In other cases these anomalies are elicited by hematoma not associated with inflammation.

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Satoshi Hirai, Kenji Yagi, Keijiro Hara, Eiichiro Kanda, Shunji Matsubara, and Masaaki Uno

OBJECTIVE

Because of an aging society, the incidence of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is increasing. This lesion is treated with simple burr hole irrigation, but one of the major issues is that CSDH frequently recurs. ABO blood type may be associated with a bleeding tendency and inflammation. However, its association with the recurrence of CSDH remains unknown. Therefore, the authors of the present study aimed to retrospectively investigate the association between ABO blood type and CSDH recurrence.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively analyzed symptomatic CSDHs in 425 cerebral hemispheres of 376 patients who had undergone surgical treatment with irrigation of the hematoma via burr holes at their institution from January 2011 to September 2019. Among these were 366 CSDHs in 320 patients whose ABO blood type had been determined and who were included in this study.

RESULTS

In the study, 307 patients with CSDHs in 350 hemispheres were followed up postoperatively until the disappearance of the CDSH or for at least 3 months. Recurrence of CSDH was observed in 37 patients (10.6%) after surgical treatment. Blood type A was found to be significantly associated with CSDH recurrence compared to non-A blood types: 24 of 153 CDSHs (15.7%) versus 13 of 197 CDSHs (6.6%) (p = 0.008). In the multivariable regression analysis, blood type A, in addition to thrombocytopenia, was a significant independent predictor of the recurrence of CSDH.

CONCLUSIONS

The study results showed that blood type A is an independent risk factor for the postoperative recurrence of CSDH and that careful follow-up in these patients may be needed.

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Koichi Miki, Kenji Yagi, Masani Nonaka, Mitsutoshi Iwaasa, Hiroshi Abe, Takashi Morishita, Hisatomi Arima, and Tooru Inoue

OBJECTIVE

In patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH), postoperative recurrent hemorrhage (PRH) is one of the most severe complications after endoscopic evacuation of hematoma (EEH). However, no predictors of this complication have been identified. In the present study, the authors retrospectively investigated whether PRH can be preoperatively predicted by the presence of the spot sign on CT scans.

METHODS

In total, 143 patients with sICH were treated by EEH between June 2009 and March 2017, and 127 patients who underwent preoperative CT angiography were included in this study. Significant correlations of PRH with the patients’ baseline, clinical, and radiographic characteristics, including the spot sign, were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression models.

RESULTS

The incidence of and risk factors for PRH were assessed in 127 patients with available data. PRH occurred in 9 (7.1%) patients. Five (21.7%) cases of PRH were observed among 23 patients with the spot sign, whereas only 4 (3.8%) cases of PRH occurred among 104 patients without the spot sign. The spot sign was the only independent predictor of PRH (OR 5.81, 95% CI 1.26–26.88; p = 0.02). The following factors were not independently associated with PRH: age, hypertension, poor consciousness, antihemostatic factors (thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, and use of antithrombotic drugs), the location and size of the sICH, other radiographic findings (black hole sign and blend sign), surgical duration and procedures, and early surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

The spot sign is likely to be a strong predictor of PRH after EEH among patients with sICH. Complete and careful control of bleeding in the operative field should be ensured when surgically treating such patients. New surgical strategies and procedures might be needed to improve these patients’ outcomes.

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Tadashi Yamaguchi, Takeshi Miyamoto, Keiko T. Kitazato, Eiji Shikata, Izumi Yamaguchi, Masaaki Korai, Kenji Shimada, Kenji Yagi, Yoshiteru Tada, Yoshihito Matsuzaki, Yasuhisa Kanematsu, and Yasushi Takagi

OBJECTIVE

The pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysm rupture remains unclear. Because it is difficult to study the time course of human aneurysms and most unruptured aneurysms are stable, animal models are used to investigate the characteristics of intracranial aneurysms. The authors have newly established a rat intracranial aneurysm rupture model that features site-specific ruptured and unruptured aneurysms. In the present study the authors examined the time course of changes in the vascular morphology to clarify the mechanisms leading to rupture.

METHODS

Ten-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to hemodynamic changes, hypertension, and ovariectomy. Morphological changes in rupture-prone intracranial arteries were examined under a scanning electron microscope and the association with vascular degradation molecules was investigated.

RESULTS

At 2–6 weeks after aneurysm induction, morphological changes and rupture were mainly observed at the posterior cerebral artery; at 7–12 weeks they were seen at the anterior Willis circle including the anterior communicating artery. No aneurysms at the anterior cerebral artery–olfactory artery bifurcation ruptured, suggesting that the inception of morphological changes is site dependent. On week 6, the messenger RNA level of matrix metalloproteinase–9, interleukin-1β, and the ratio of matrix metalloproteinase–9 to the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase–2 was significantly higher at the posterior cerebral artery, but not at the anterior communicating artery, of rats with aneurysms than in sham-operated rats. These findings suggest that aneurysm rupture is attributable to significant morphological changes and an increase in degradation molecules.

CONCLUSIONS

Time-dependent and site-dependent morphological changes and the level of degradation molecules may be indicative of the vulnerability of aneurysms to rupture.