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Kyung Hwan Kim, So Jeong Kang, Jung-Won Choi, Doo-Sik Kong, Ho Jun Seol, Do-Hyun Nam and Jung-Il Lee

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to verify the effect of proactive Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) in the treatment of asymptomatic meningioma compared with the natural course without any therapeutic intervention.

METHODS

From January 2006 to May 2017, 354 patients newly diagnosed with asymptomatic meningioma were reviewed and categorized into GKS (n = 153) and observation (n = 201) groups. Clinical and radiological progression rates were examined, and changes in volume were analyzed.

RESULTS

Clinical progression (i.e., clinician-judged progression), combining symptomatic progression (n = 43) and clinician-judged increase in size using images routinely acquired (n = 34), occurred in 4 patients (2.6%) and 73 patients (36.3%) in the GKS and observation groups, respectively (p < 0.001). The clinical progression-free survival (PFS) rates in the GKS and observation groups were 98.7% and 64.6%, respectively, at 5 years (p < 0.001), and 92.9% and 42.7%, respectively, at 10 years (p < 0.001). The radiological tumor control rate was 94.1% in the GKS group, and radiological progression was noted in 141 patients (70.1%) in the observation group. The radiological PFS rates in the GKS and observation groups were 94.4% and 38.5%, respectively, at 5 years (p < 0.001), and 88.5% and 7.9%, respectively, at 10 years (p < 0.001). Young age, absence of calcification, peritumoral edema, and high T2 signal intensity were correlated with clinical progression in the observation group. Volumetric analysis showed that untreated tumors gradually increased in size. However, GKS-treated tumors shrank gradually, although transient volume expansion was observed in the first 6 months. Adverse events developed in 26 of the 195 GKS-treated patients (13.3%), including 1 (0.5%) major event requiring microsurgery due to severe edema after GKS. Peritumoral edema was related to the development of adverse events (p = 0.004).

CONCLUSIONS

Asymptomatic meningioma is a benign disease; however, nearly two-thirds of patients experience tumor growth and one-third of untreated patients eventually require neurosurgical interventions during watchful waiting. GKS can control tumors clinically and radiologically with high probability. Although the risk of transient adverse events exists, proactive GKS may be a reasonable treatment option when there are no comorbidities limiting life expectancy.

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Dong Gyu Kim, Jong Soo Kim, Je G. Chi, Sung Hye Park, Hee-Won Jung, Kil Soo Choi and Dae Hee Han

✓ The authors analyzed 13 central neurocytomas diagnosed at Seoul National University Hospital between January 1982 and December 1993 to clarify the proliferative potential and biological behavior of these tumors. The tumor was confined to the lateral and third ventricles in 12 cases and in one case extended from the posterior thalamus to the body and trigone area of the lateral ventricle. In all 13 cases, typical clinical and radiological findings were observed, and histological diagnosis was performed via craniotomy. The diagnosis was made using light microscopic examination, immunohistochemical staining for neuronal markers, and electron microscopic findings of neuronal differentiation. One patient died due to tumor progression with recurrence 26 months after subtotal removal plus radiation therapy. Another patient had a recurrence 18 months after total tumor removal. The remaining 11 patients are free of recurrent tumor after a follow-up period that ranged from 14 to 109 months (median 50 months). To predict the proliferative potential, immunoreactivity to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), silver colloid staining for nucleolar organizing regions (AgNORs), and DNA flow cytometry were performed in 10 of the 13 cases. The proportion of PCNA-positive cells was less than 1% in all cases and the AgNORs score ranged from 1.11 to 2.0 (mean 1.67). The DNA flow cytometry revealed diploidy in all cases and the calculated proliferation index ranged from 5.1% to 9.6% (mean 7.8%). The one case of tumor recurrence, in which the authors performed the study of proliferative potential, and another case that demonstrated mild nuclear pleomorphism also showed low percentages of PCNA-positive cells, low AgNORs scores, and diploidy in DNA flow cytometry.

It is suggested that most central neurocytomas follow a benign clinical course with low proliferative potential assessed by PCNA, AgNORs, and DNA flow cytometry; however, recurrence is possible within a relatively short time period.

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Jung Won Choi, Seung-Ki Kim, Kyu-Chang Wang, Ji Yeoun Lee, Jung-Eun Cheon and Ji Hoon Phi

Object

Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt surgery is the most common treatment for hydrocephalus. In certain situations, uncommon complications can occur after shunting procedures. The authors undertook this study to analyze the clinical characteristics of pediatric patients who developed multifocal intraparenchymal hemorrhages (MIPHs) as a complication of shunt surgery. The authors also analyzed the risk factors for MIPH in a large cohort of patients with hydrocephalus.

Methods

This study included all pediatric patients (age < 18 years) who underwent VP shunt surgery at the authors' institution between January 2001 and December 2012. During this period, 507 VP shunt operations were performed in 330 patients. Four of these patients were subsequently diagnosed as having MIPH. The authors analyzed the clinical characteristics of these patients in comparison with those of the entire group of shunt-treated patients.

Results

The incidence of MIPH was 1.2% (4 of 330 cases) for all pediatric patients who underwent VP shunt placement but 2.9% (4 of 140 cases) for infants less than 1 year old. When the analysis was limited to patients whose corrected age was less than 3 months, the incidence was 5.3% (4 of 76 cases). Of the 4 patients with MIPH, 2 were male and 2 were female. Their median age at surgery was 54 days (range 25–127 days), and in all 4 cases, the patients' corrected age was less than 1 month. Three patients were preterm infants, whereas one patient was full-term. None of these patients had a prior history of intracranial surgery (including CSF diversion procedures). All showed severe hydrocephalus during the preoperative period. Their clinical courses as patients with MIPH were comparatively favorable, despite the radiological findings.

Conclusions

MIPH is a rare but not negligible complication of VP shunt surgery. This complication might be a unique phenomenon in infants, especially young, preterm infants with severe hydrocephalus. Moreover, the absence of previous intracranial procedures might be one of the risk factors for this complication. The rapid alteration of brain conditions in the setting of immaturity might cause MIPH. To prevent this complication, the authors recommend that pressure settings of programmable valves should be gradually adapted to the target pressure.

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Min Ho Lee, Kyung Hwan Kim, Kyung Rae Cho, Jung Won Choi, Doo-Sik Kong, Ho Jun Seol, Do-Hyun Nam and Jung-Il Lee

OBJECTIVE

Fractionated Gamma Knife surgery (FGKS) has recently been used to treat large brain metastases. However, little is known about specific volume changes of lesions during the course of treatment. The authors investigated short-term volume changes of metastatic lesions during FGKS.

METHODS

The authors analyzed 33 patients with 40 lesions who underwent FGKS for intracranial metastases of non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC; 25 patients with 32 lesions) and breast cancer (8 patients with 8 lesions). FGKS was performed in 3–5 fractions. Baseline MRI was performed before the first fraction. MRI was repeated after 1 or 2 fractions. Adaptive planning was executed based on new images. The median prescription dose was 8 Gy (range 6–10 Gy) with a 50% isodose line.

RESULTS

On follow-up MRI, 18 of 40 lesions (45.0%) showed decreased tumor volumes (TVs). A significant difference was observed between baseline (median 15.8 cm3) and follow-up (median 14.2 cm3) volumes (p < 0.001). A conformity index was significantly decreased when it was assumed that adaptive planning was not implemented, from baseline (mean 0.96) to follow-up (mean 0.90, p < 0.001). The average reduction rate was 1.5% per day. The median follow-up duration was 29.5 weeks (range 9–94 weeks). During the follow-up period, local recurrence occurred in 5 lesions.

CONCLUSIONS

The TV showed changes with a high dose of radiation during the course of FGKS. Volumetric change caused a significant difference in the clinical parameters. It is expected that adaptive planning would be helpful in the case of radiosensitive tumors such as NSCLCs or breast cancer to ensure an adequate dose to the target area and reduce unnecessary exposure of normal tissue to radiation.

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Kyung Hwan Kim, Doo-Sik Kong, Kyung Rae Cho, Min Ho Lee, Jung-Won Choi, Ho Jun Seol, Sung Tae Kim, Do-Hyun Nam and Jung-Il Lee

OBJECTIVE

Fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKS) represents a feasible option for patients with large brain metastases (BM). However, the dose-fractionation scheme balanced between local control and radiation-induced toxicity remains unclear. Therefore, the authors conducted a dose-escalation study using fractionated GKS as the primary treatment for large (> 3 cm) BM.

METHODS

The exclusion criteria were more than 3 lesions, evidence of leptomeningeal disease, metastatic melanoma, poor general condition, and previously treated lesions. Patients were randomized to receive 24, 27, or 30 Gy in 3 fractions (8, 9, or 10 Gy per fraction, respectively). The primary endpoint was the development of radiation necrosis assessed by a neuroradiologist blinded to the study. The secondary endpoints included the local progression-free survival (PFS) rate, change in tumor volume, development of distant intracranial progression, and overall survival.

RESULTS

Between September 2016 and April 2018, 60 patients were eligible for the study, with 46 patients (15, 17, and 14 patients in the 8-, 9-, and 10-Gy groups, respectively) available for analysis. The median follow-up duration was 9.6 months (range 2.5–25.1 months). The 6-month estimated cumulative incidence of radiation necrosis was 0% in the 8-Gy group, 13% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0%–29%) in the 9-Gy group, and 37% (95% CI 1%–58%) in the 10-Gy group. Being in the 10-Gy group was a significant risk factor for the development of radiation necrosis (p = 0.047; hazard ratio [HR] 7.2, 95% CI 1.1–51.4). The 12-month local PFS rates were 65%, 80%, and 75% in the 8-, 9-, and 10-Gy groups, respectively. Being in the 8-Gy group was a risk factor for local treatment failure (p = 0.037; HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1–29.6). The mean volume change from baseline was a 47.5% decrease in this cohort. Distant intracranial progression and overall survival did not differ among the 3 groups.

CONCLUSIONS

In this dose-escalation study, 27 Gy in 3 fractions appeared to be a relevant regimen of fractionated GKS for large BM because 30 Gy in 3 fractions resulted in unacceptable toxicities and 24 Gy in 3 fractions was associated with local treatment failure.

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Chiman Jeon, Chang-Ki Hong, Kyung In Woo, Sang Duk Hong, Do-Hyun Nam, Jung-Il Lee, Jung Won Choi, Ho Jun Seol and Doo-Sik Kong

OBJECTIVE

Tumors involving Meckel’s cave remain extremely challenging because of the surrounding complex neurovascular structures and deep-seated location. The authors investigated a new minimal-access technique using the endoscopic transorbital approach (eTOA) through the superior eyelid crease to Meckel’s cave and middle cranial fossa lesions and reviewed the most useful surgical procedures and pitfalls of this approach.

METHODS

Between September 2016 and January 2018, the authors performed eTOA in 9 patients with tumors involving Meckel’s cave and the middle cranial fossa. The lesions included trigeminal schwannoma in 4 patients, meningioma in 2 patients, metastatic brain tumor in 1 patient, chondrosarcoma in 1 patient, and dermoid cyst in 1 patient. In 7 of the 9 patients, eTOA alone was performed, while the other 2 patients underwent a combined eTOA and endoscopic endonasal approach or retrosigmoid craniotomy. Data including details of surgical techniques and clinical outcomes were recorded.

RESULTS

Gross-total resection was performed in 7 of the 9 patients (77.8%). Four patients underwent extended eTOA (with lateral orbital rim osteotomy). Drilling of the trapezoid sphenoid floor, a middle fossa “peeling” technique, and full visualization of Meckel’s cave were applied to approach the lesions. Tumors were exposed and removed extradurally in 3 patients and intradurally in 6 patients. There was no postoperative CSF leak.

CONCLUSIONS

The eTOA affords a direct route to access Meckel’s cave and middle cranial fossa lesions. With experience, this novel approach can be successfully applied to selected skull base lesions. To achieve successful removal of the tumor, emphasis should be placed on the importance of adequately removing the greater sphenoid wing and vertical crest. However, because of limited working space eTOA may not be an ideal approach for posterior fossa lesions.

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Jung Won Choi, Sung Min Son, Inhee Mook-Jung, Youn Joo Moon, Ji Yeoun Lee, Kyu-Chang Wang, Hyun-Seung Kang, Ji Hoon Phi, Seung Ah Choi, Sangjoon Chong, Jayoung Byun and Seung-Ki Kim

OBJECTIVE

Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a unique cerebrovascular disorder characterized by the progressive occlusion of the bilateral internal carotid arteries. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), previously termed “endothelial progenitor cells,” play an important role in the pathogenesis of MMD. In this study, the authors performed morphological and functional studies of the mitochondria of ECFCs from patients with MMD to present new insights into the pathogenesis of the disease.

METHODS

The morphology of ECFCs from 5 MMD patients and 5 healthy controls was examined under both a transmission electron microscope and a confocal laser scanning microscope. The oxygen consumption rates (OCRs), mitochondrial membrane potentials (MMPs), intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, mitochondrial enzyme activities, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were measured. Functional activity of the ECFCs was evaluated using a capillary tube formation assay.

RESULTS

The ECFCs from the MMD patients displayed a disrupted mitochondrial morphology, including a shorter and more circular shape. The ECFC mitochondria from the MMD patients exhibited functional abnormalities, which were assessed as a decreased OCR and an increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Moreover, the ECFCs from MMD patients showed increased ROS levels. Interestingly, treatment with an ROS scavenger not only reversed the mitochondrial abnormalities but also restored the angiogenic activity of the ECFCs from the MMD patients.

CONCLUSIONS

The mitochondria of ECFCs from MMD patients, as compared with those from healthy patients, exhibited morphological and functional abnormalities. This finding suggests that the mitochondrial abnormalities may have a role in the pathogenesis of MMD.

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Dong Gyu Kim, Sun Ha Paek, Kee-Hyun Chang, Kyu-Chang Wang, Hee-Won Jung, Hyun Jib Kim, Je G. Chi, Kil Soo Choi and Dae Hee Han

✓ Cerebral sparganosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by infestation by the plerocercoid larva of Spirometra mansoni. The authors retrospectively analyzed 17 cases of cerebral sparganosis treated at Seoul National University Hospital between 1986 and 1994. The patients' ages at diagnosis ranged from ± to 57 years (median 32 years) and the male/female ratio was 13:4. Diagnosis was based on radiological findings, serological test results, operative findings, and histopathological examinations. Characteristic magnetic resonance (MR) findings consisted of widespread white matter degeneration and cortical atrophy, mixed-signal lesion (low in the central and high in the peripheral regions on T2-weighted images) with irregular dense enhancement of central foci and changes in the location and shape of the enhancing lesion in follow-up studies. Ten patients underwent surgical removal of the parasitic lesion, six received medical treatment alone (five with praziquantel and one with antiepileptic drugs), and one underwent insertion of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt and a course of praziquantel. Follow-up periods ranged from 13 to 111 months (mean 49 months). Seven patients who underwent complete removal of the lesion, live worm, or degenerative worm with surrounding granuloma showed a favorable course. Patients who received medical treatment alone or incomplete removal exhibited progression in their neurological deficits and their seizures could not be controlled. Medication with praziquantel seemed to have no killing effect on live worms.

The authors conclude that MR imaging is the most valuable modality for the early detection of cerebral sparganosis and that complete surgical removal of granuloma together with worms, whether they are alive or degenerative, is the treatment of choice.

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Dong Gyu Kim, Je G. Chi, Sung Hye Park, Kee Hyun Chang, Sun Ho Lee, Hee-Won Jung, Hyun Jib Kim, Byung-Kyu Cho, Kil Soo Choi and Dae Hee Han

✓ A retrospective analysis of seven patients with intraventricular neurocytoma is presented. Patient age at diagnosis ranged from 15 to 38 years (mean 24.6 years) and the male:female ratio was 6:1. Raised intracranial pressure due to hydrocephalus was the main cause of the clinical manifestations. An isodense mass with multiple intratumoral cysts and homogeneous contrast enhancement was the characteristic computerized tomography finding. The lesions commonly involved the lateral ventricle with or without extension to the third ventricle. Cerebral angiography showed homogeneous vascular staining in five patients. Magnetic resonance images revealed a mass isointense with the cerebral cortex on both T1 and T2-weighted images. Gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid-enhanced images showed homogeneous enhancement. Total removal of the tumor was possible in four patients. Pathologically, six cases were initially diagnosed as oligodendroglioma and the remaining case as ependymoma. However, immunohistochemical studies demonstrated strong positivity for neuron-specific enolase in all seven cases and for synaptophysin in five cases. On electron microscopy, three cases showed well-defined neurosecretory granules and 10-nm microtubules in their cytoplasm and cytoplasmic processes. One patient developed a recurrent tumor 18 months after surgery. The remaining six patients are free of recurrent tumors at 2 to 62 months after surgery. It is suggested that neurocytoma must be included in the differential diagnosis of intraventricular lesions, and that electron microscopic and immunohistochemical studies should be undertaken.

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Ji Hoon Phi, Jung Won Choi, Moon-Woo Seong, Tackeun Kim, Youn Joo Moon, Joongyub Lee, Eun Jung Koh, Seul Ki Ryu, Tae Hee Kang, Jae Seung Bang, Chang Wan Oh, Sung Sup Park, Ji Yeoun Lee, Kyu-Chang Wang and Seung-Ki Kim

OBJECTIVE

In a minority of patients with neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF-1), cerebral vasculopathy reminiscent of moyamoya disease develops. This phenomenon is called moyamoya syndrome (MMS), but there are no known risk factors for the prediction of MMS in NF-1 patients. Polymorphism of the RNF213 gene has exhibited strong associations with familial and sporadic moyamoya disease and other cerebral vasculopathies. The aim of this study is to find whether the RNF213 c.14576G>A variant is associated with MMS development in the NF-1 population or not.

METHODS

The MMS group included 16 NF-1 patients with documented MMS. The control group consisted of 97 NF-1 patients without MMS. Genomic DNA samples were obtained from the saliva or blood of both groups, and the presence of the RNF213 c.14576G>A variant was assessed by Sanger sequencing.

RESULTS

In the MMS group, 3 patients had the RNF213 c.14576G>A variant (18.7%), whereas no patients with this genetic variation were observed in the control group (0%). There was a meaningful association between the RNF213 c.14576G>A variant and MMS development (p = 0.0024). The crude odds ratio was calculated as 50.57 (95% CI 1.57–1624.41). All 3 patients with MMS and the c.14576G>A variant were diagnosed with MMS at an early age and had bilateral involvement.

CONCLUSIONS

The RNF213 c.14576G>A variant is more common in NF-1 patients who develop MMS than in NF-1 patients without MMS. This variant might be a susceptibility gene for the NF-1–moyamoya connection.