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Hyun Gi Kim, Seung-Koo Lee and Jung-Dong Lee

OBJECTIVE

Young patients with moyamoya disease can exhibit infarction after revascularization surgery. This analysis of the characteristics of infarction after encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis (EDAS) in young patients with moyamoya disease was undertaken in an effort to elucidate the infarction mechanism.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively collected clinical information and reviewed pre- and postoperative MRI studies from cases involving patients younger than 18 years who underwent EDAS for the treatment of moyamoya disease between January 2012 and February 2015. Infarction patterns were categorized into watershed, territorial, or mixed pattern. The Wilcoxon rank sum test, chi-square test, and Fisher exact test were used to compare the clinical and imaging variables between patient groups. The characteristics of patients with and without postoperative infarction were compared using univariate and multivariate analysis. The cumulative proportion of patients without postoperative infarction according to operation stage was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the resulting curves were compared using the log-rank test.

RESULTS

In 100 patients, 171 EDAS procedures had been performed. There were 38 cases of preoperative infarction in 35 patients and 20 cases of postoperative infarction in 13 patients. Territorial infarction was more frequent in the postoperative infarction group than in the preoperative infarction group (55.0% vs 37.8%, p = 0.037). Infarction was more common on the bilateral or contralateral side of the operation after first-stage EDAS (9 [75.0%] of 12 infarctions) than in the second-stage operation (2 [25.0%] of 8 infarctions), but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.068). The frequency of postoperative infarction was not significantly different depending on the stage of the operation (p = 0.694).

CONCLUSIONS

An acute infarction pattern after EDAS was more frequently territorial, suggesting an underlying occlusive mechanism. Operation stage did not affect the rate of postoperative infarction occurrence.

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Taek-Kyun Nam, Jung-Il Lee, Young-Jo Jung, Yong-Seok Im, Hee-Ye An, Do-Hyun Nam, Kwan Park and Jong-Hyun Kim

Object. This study was performed to evaluate the role of gamma knife surgery (GKS) in patients with a large number (four or more) of metastatic brain lesions.

Methods. The authors retrospectively reviewed the outcome in 130 patients who underwent GKS for metastatic lesions. Eighty-four patients presented with one to three lesions (Group A) and 46 presented with four or more lesions (Group B). The overall median survival time after GKS was 35 weeks. The median survival time in Group A (48 weeks) was significantly longer (p = 0.005) than the survival time in Group B (26 weeks). The recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class was the only significant prognostic factor identified in multivariate analysis. The median survival for patients in RPA Classes I, II, and III was 72, 48, and 19 weeks, respectively, in Group A and 36 and 13 weeks for Classes II and III in Group B. The number of lesions, tumor volume, whole brain radiotherapy, primary tumor site, age, and sex did not affect survival significantly.

Conclusions. It is suggested that GKS provides an increase in survival time even in patients with a large number (four or more) of metastatic lesions. Concerning the selection of patients for GKS, RPA class should be considered as the most important factor and multiplicity of the lesions alone should not be a reason for withholding GKS.

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Jaechan Park, Tae-du Jung, Dong-Hun Kang and So-Hyun Lee

Object

Although a supraorbital keyhole approach utilizing an eyebrow incision and supraorbital minicraniotomy is one of the most commonly used keyhole approaches for treating cerebral aneurysms, the risk of frontalis muscle palsy due to an injury of the frontal branch of the facial nerve remains a serious drawback to a supraorbital keyhole approach as a minimally invasive surgical technique. Therefore, the authors attempted to evaluate the risk of frontalis muscle palsy by mapping the frontal nerve branch in the lower forehead using a nerve conduction study in individual patients.

Methods

Percutaneous mapping of the frontal nerve branch was performed preoperatively on 52 patients who underwent supraorbital keyhole approaches for aneurysmal clipping. The maximal compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) in the lower forehead were observed at 5 points along a laterally inclined line angled 30° from the midpupillary line, in which the points were 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 cm as measured from the supraorbital margin.

Results

Severe frontalis muscle palsy was observed in 11 patients (21.2%), yet recovery occurred 2–5 months after surgery. No patients experienced permanent palsy. The incidence of severe palsy was 7.4% in those patients showing clear CMAPs with a high location (exclusively at 2.0, 2.5, or 3.0 cm), 14.3% in those with a bimodal distribution, 40.0% in those with a low location (exclusively at 1.5 cm), and 83.3% in those with an extremely low location (exclusively at 1.0 cm).

Conclusions

Percutaneous mapping of the frontal branch of the facial nerve using a nerve conduction study can be used to assess the risk of postoperative frontalis muscle palsy following a supraorbital keyhole approach. The patients with the highest risk of postoperative palsy showed a clear CMAP exclusively at 1.0 cm along the inclined line measured from the supraorbital margin.

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Jung-Hee Lee, Ki-Tack Kim, Kyung-Soo Suk, Sang-Hun Lee, Bi-O Jeong, Hyun-Seok Oh, Chul-Hee Lee and Myung-Seo Kim

Intraspinal cystic lesions with different pathogeneses have been reported to cause neurological deficits; however, no one has focused on the intraspinal extradural cysts that develop after osteoporotic compression fracture. The reported case features a 66-year-old woman presenting with progressive neurological deficit, back pain, and no history of additional trauma after undergoing conservative treatment for an osteoporotic fracture of L-1. The authors present serial radiographs and MR images demonstrating an epidural cyst successfully treated via a single posterior approach. This appears to be the first such case reported in the literature.

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Doo-Sik Kong, Do-Hyun Nam, Jung-Il Lee, Kwan Park and Jong Hyun Kim

Object

The authors conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) followed by radiotherapy for the treatment of unresectable glioblastomas multiforme (GBMs) on patient survival and quality of life.

Methods

A total of 19 patients with unresectable GBMs located in eloquent areas of the brain were eligible for this study. Beginning in January 2002, 10 patients underwent GKS followed by fractionated radiotherapy. Nine patients who had undergone radiotherapy alone after biopsy-proven diagnosis served as the control group. The mean patient ages were 53 years and 56 years, respectively. Preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) scores were 80 (range 60–100) and 90 (range 50–100), respectively. The median margin dose for GKS was 12 Gy (9–16 Gy), and the total dose for radiotherapy was 60 Gy in 30 fractions. The mean follow-up duration was 7.2 months, the median patient survival time was 52 weeks (95% confidence interval [CI] 22–110.6 weeks) in the GKS group, and the median overall survival time was 28 weeks (95% CI 22.5–33.5 weeks) in the control group. The difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.0758). The estimated progression-free survival rate at 3 months was 75% in the GKS group and 45% in the control group (p = 0.082). The posttreatment KPS scores were either unchanged or improved in the GKS group, whereas it deteriorated by 20 or more points in six of nine patients of the control group (p = 0.004).

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery prior to radiotherapy may be helpful in preserving patients' daily activities in the adjuvant management of unresectable GBM.

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Kyung Hwan Kim, So Jeong Kang, Jung-Won Choi, Doo-Sik Kong, Ho Jun Seol, Do-Hyun Nam and Jung-Il Lee

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to verify the effect of proactive Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) in the treatment of asymptomatic meningioma compared with the natural course without any therapeutic intervention.

METHODS

From January 2006 to May 2017, 354 patients newly diagnosed with asymptomatic meningioma were reviewed and categorized into GKS (n = 153) and observation (n = 201) groups. Clinical and radiological progression rates were examined, and changes in volume were analyzed.

RESULTS

Clinical progression (i.e., clinician-judged progression), combining symptomatic progression (n = 43) and clinician-judged increase in size using images routinely acquired (n = 34), occurred in 4 patients (2.6%) and 73 patients (36.3%) in the GKS and observation groups, respectively (p < 0.001). The clinical progression-free survival (PFS) rates in the GKS and observation groups were 98.7% and 64.6%, respectively, at 5 years (p < 0.001), and 92.9% and 42.7%, respectively, at 10 years (p < 0.001). The radiological tumor control rate was 94.1% in the GKS group, and radiological progression was noted in 141 patients (70.1%) in the observation group. The radiological PFS rates in the GKS and observation groups were 94.4% and 38.5%, respectively, at 5 years (p < 0.001), and 88.5% and 7.9%, respectively, at 10 years (p < 0.001). Young age, absence of calcification, peritumoral edema, and high T2 signal intensity were correlated with clinical progression in the observation group. Volumetric analysis showed that untreated tumors gradually increased in size. However, GKS-treated tumors shrank gradually, although transient volume expansion was observed in the first 6 months. Adverse events developed in 26 of the 195 GKS-treated patients (13.3%), including 1 (0.5%) major event requiring microsurgery due to severe edema after GKS. Peritumoral edema was related to the development of adverse events (p = 0.004).

CONCLUSIONS

Asymptomatic meningioma is a benign disease; however, nearly two-thirds of patients experience tumor growth and one-third of untreated patients eventually require neurosurgical interventions during watchful waiting. GKS can control tumors clinically and radiologically with high probability. Although the risk of transient adverse events exists, proactive GKS may be a reasonable treatment option when there are no comorbidities limiting life expectancy.

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Jung Hee Kim, Yun-Sik Dho, Yong Hwy Kim, Jung Hyun Lee, Ji Hyun Lee, A. Ram Hong and Chan Soo Shin

OBJECTIVE

The natural history and proper algorithm for follow-up testing of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (PAs) are not well known, despite their relatively high prevalence. The aim of this study was to suggest the optimal follow-up algorithm for nonfunctioning PAs based on their natural history.

METHODS

The authors followed up 197 patients with nonfunctioning PAs that had not been treated (including surgery and radiation therapy) at the time of detection, in a single center, between March 2000 and February 2017. They conducted a hormone test, visual field test, and MRI at the time of diagnosis and yearly thereafter.

RESULTS

The overall median follow-up duration was 37 months. Microadenomas (n = 38) did not cause visual disturbance, pituitary apoplexy, or endocrine dysfunction. The incidence of patients with tumor volume growth ≥ 20% was higher for macroadenomas than microadenomas (13.8 vs 5.0 per 100 person-years [PYs], p = 0.002). The median time to any tumor growth was 4.8 years (95% CI 3.4–4.8 years) for microadenomas and 4 years (95% CI 3.3–4.2 years) for macroadenomas. The overall incidence of worsening visual function was 0.69 per 100 PYs. Patients with a tumor volume growth rate ≥ 0.88 cm3/year (n = 20) had a higher incidence of worsening visual function (4.69 vs 0.30 per 100 PYs, p < 0.001). The tumor growth rate of all microadenomas was < 0.88 cm3/year. The median time to tumor growth ≥ 20% was 3.3 years (95% CI 1.8–3.9 years) in patients with a tumor growth rate ≥ 0.88 cm3/year and 4.9 years (95% CI 4.6–7.2 years) in patients with a tumor growth rate < 0.88 cm3/year.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors have devised a follow-up strategy based on the tumor volume growth rate as well as initial tumor volume. In patients with microadenomas, the next MRI study can be performed at 3 years. In patients with macroadenomas, the second MRI study should be performed between 6 months and 1 year to assess the tumor growth rate. In patients with a tumor growth rate ≥ 0.88 cm3/year, the MRI study should be performed within 2 years. In patients with a tumor growth rate < 0.88 cm3/year, the MRI study can be delayed until 4 years.

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Min Ho Lee, Kyung Hwan Kim, Kyung Rae Cho, Jung Won Choi, Doo-Sik Kong, Ho Jun Seol, Do-Hyun Nam and Jung-Il Lee

OBJECTIVE

Fractionated Gamma Knife surgery (FGKS) has recently been used to treat large brain metastases. However, little is known about specific volume changes of lesions during the course of treatment. The authors investigated short-term volume changes of metastatic lesions during FGKS.

METHODS

The authors analyzed 33 patients with 40 lesions who underwent FGKS for intracranial metastases of non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC; 25 patients with 32 lesions) and breast cancer (8 patients with 8 lesions). FGKS was performed in 3–5 fractions. Baseline MRI was performed before the first fraction. MRI was repeated after 1 or 2 fractions. Adaptive planning was executed based on new images. The median prescription dose was 8 Gy (range 6–10 Gy) with a 50% isodose line.

RESULTS

On follow-up MRI, 18 of 40 lesions (45.0%) showed decreased tumor volumes (TVs). A significant difference was observed between baseline (median 15.8 cm3) and follow-up (median 14.2 cm3) volumes (p < 0.001). A conformity index was significantly decreased when it was assumed that adaptive planning was not implemented, from baseline (mean 0.96) to follow-up (mean 0.90, p < 0.001). The average reduction rate was 1.5% per day. The median follow-up duration was 29.5 weeks (range 9–94 weeks). During the follow-up period, local recurrence occurred in 5 lesions.

CONCLUSIONS

The TV showed changes with a high dose of radiation during the course of FGKS. Volumetric change caused a significant difference in the clinical parameters. It is expected that adaptive planning would be helpful in the case of radiosensitive tumors such as NSCLCs or breast cancer to ensure an adequate dose to the target area and reduce unnecessary exposure of normal tissue to radiation.

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Kyung Hwan Kim, Doo-Sik Kong, Kyung Rae Cho, Min Ho Lee, Jung-Won Choi, Ho Jun Seol, Sung Tae Kim, Do-Hyun Nam and Jung-Il Lee

OBJECTIVE

Fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKS) represents a feasible option for patients with large brain metastases (BM). However, the dose-fractionation scheme balanced between local control and radiation-induced toxicity remains unclear. Therefore, the authors conducted a dose-escalation study using fractionated GKS as the primary treatment for large (> 3 cm) BM.

METHODS

The exclusion criteria were more than 3 lesions, evidence of leptomeningeal disease, metastatic melanoma, poor general condition, and previously treated lesions. Patients were randomized to receive 24, 27, or 30 Gy in 3 fractions (8, 9, or 10 Gy per fraction, respectively). The primary endpoint was the development of radiation necrosis assessed by a neuroradiologist blinded to the study. The secondary endpoints included the local progression-free survival (PFS) rate, change in tumor volume, development of distant intracranial progression, and overall survival.

RESULTS

Between September 2016 and April 2018, 60 patients were eligible for the study, with 46 patients (15, 17, and 14 patients in the 8-, 9-, and 10-Gy groups, respectively) available for analysis. The median follow-up duration was 9.6 months (range 2.5–25.1 months). The 6-month estimated cumulative incidence of radiation necrosis was 0% in the 8-Gy group, 13% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0%–29%) in the 9-Gy group, and 37% (95% CI 1%–58%) in the 10-Gy group. Being in the 10-Gy group was a significant risk factor for the development of radiation necrosis (p = 0.047; hazard ratio [HR] 7.2, 95% CI 1.1–51.4). The 12-month local PFS rates were 65%, 80%, and 75% in the 8-, 9-, and 10-Gy groups, respectively. Being in the 8-Gy group was a risk factor for local treatment failure (p = 0.037; HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1–29.6). The mean volume change from baseline was a 47.5% decrease in this cohort. Distant intracranial progression and overall survival did not differ among the 3 groups.

CONCLUSIONS

In this dose-escalation study, 27 Gy in 3 fractions appeared to be a relevant regimen of fractionated GKS for large BM because 30 Gy in 3 fractions resulted in unacceptable toxicities and 24 Gy in 3 fractions was associated with local treatment failure.

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Byung Sup Kim, Yuil Kim, Doo-Sik Kong, Do-Hyun Nam, Jung-Il Lee, Yeon-Lim Suh and Ho Jun Seol

OBJECTIVE

The authors conducted this retrospective study to investigate the clinical outcomes of intracranial solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) and hemangiopericytoma (HPC), defined according to the 2016 WHO classification of central nervous system (CNS) tumors.

METHODS

Histopathologically proven intracranial SFT and HPC cases treated in the period from June 1996 to September 2014 were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Two neuropathologists reviewed pathological slides and regraded the specimens according to the 2016 WHO classification. Factors associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were statistically evaluated with uni- and multivariate analyses.

RESULTS

The records of 47 patients—10 with SFT, 33 with HPC, and 4 with anaplastic HPC—were reviewed. A malignant transition from conventional SFT to WHO grade III SFT/HPC was observed in 2 cases, and 13 HPC cases were assigned grade III SFT/HPC. Mean and median follow-ups were 114.6 and 94.7 months, respectively (range 7.1–366.7 months). Gross-total resection (GTR) was significantly associated with longer PFS and OS (p = 0.012 for both), and adjuvant radiation therapy versus no such therapy led to significantly longer PFS (p = 0.018). Extracranial metastases to the liver, bone, lung, spine, and kidney occurred in 10 patients (21.3%). Grade III SFT/HPC was strongly correlated with the development of extracranial metastases (p = 0.031).

CONCLUSIONS

The 2016 WHO classification of CNS tumors reflected the different types of pathological malignant progression and clinical outcomes better than prior classifications. Gross-total resection should be the primary treatment goal in patients with SFT/HPC, regardless of the pathological grade, and radiation can be administered as adjuvant therapy for patients with SFT/HPC that shows an aggressive phenotype or that is not treated with GTR.