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Tao Yu, Xingwen Sun, Yan You, Jie Chen, Jun-mei Wang, Shuo Wang, Ning Lin, Buqing Liang and Jizong Zhao

Brain capillary telangiectasias (BCTs) are usually small and benign with a predilection in the pons and basal ganglion. Reports of large and symptomatic BCTs are rare. Large BCTs have a much higher risk of causing uncontrolled bleeding and severe neurological defects, and they can be fatal if left untreated. Therefore, large BCTs should be managed with special caution. Because of the lack of reports, diagnosis of large BCTs has been difficult. Strategies of management are undefined for large or giant BCTs.

The current study presents 5 cases of giant and large BCTs. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the largest series of this disease ever reported. Radiological findings, histopathological characteristics, clinical presentations, and surgical management were analyzed in 5 symptomatic, unusually large BCTs (mean diameter 5.06 cm, range 1.8–8 cm).

Four patients presented with focal or generalized seizures, and 1 patient presented with transient vision loss attributed to the lesions. Gross-total resection of the lesion was achieved in all patients. After surgery, the 4 patients with seizures were symptom free for follow-up periods varying from more than 1 to 5 years with no additional neurological deficits.

The unique location, radiological characteristics, and clinical course suggest that giant BCTs could be a different entity from small BCTs. Surgery might be a good option for treatment of patients with intractable neurological symptoms, especially in those with surgically accessible locations. Complete removal would be anticipated to provide relief of the symptoms without causing new neurological deficits.

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Da Li, Shu-Yu Hao, Liang Wang, Gui-Lin Li, Jun-Mei Wang, Zhen Wu, Li-Wei Zhang, Jun-Ting Zhang and Wang Jia

OBJECTIVE

Medulloepithelioma (MEPL) is a rare, malignant primitive neuroectodermal tumor with dismal survival rates. The authors aimed to define independent risk factors for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) and to propose an optimal treatment protocol for MEPL.

METHODS

The authors reviewed the clinicoradiological data obtained in 12 patients with MEPL who underwent surgical treatment at their institution between January 2008 and June 2016. In addition, they reviewed 55 cases of MEPL published in the literature from January 1957 to July 2017. A pooled analysis of individual patient data of these 67 patients was performed to evaluate risk factors.

RESULTS

The authors’ cohort included 5 males and 7 females with a mean age of 15.7 years. Gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in 10 (83.3%) patients. Radiotherapy (mean total dose 42.8 Gy) and chemotherapy were administered to 7 and 4 patients, respectively. After a median follow-up of 21.7 months, 6 (50%) patients suffered recurrence and subsequently died, with median PFS and OS times of 5.5 and 13.9 months, respectively. Among the 55 patients in the literature, 13 (23.6%) patients received GTR, and 25 (49.0%) and 15 (29.4%) received radiotherapy (median total dose 53.2 Gy) and chemotherapy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 10.0 months, the recurrence and mortality rates were 69.7% (23/33) and 70.8% (34/48), respectively, and the median PFS was 6.0 months. Of the pooled cohort, the actuarial 5-year PFS and OS were 36.3% and 29.2%, respectively, and the estimated median survival time for PFS and OS were 12.8 and 15.2 months, respectively. A multivariate Cox model verified non-GTR (HR 5.537, p < 0.001) and no radiotherapy (HR 3.553, p = 0.008) as independent adverse factors for PFS. The 5-year PFS in patients with or without GTR was 63.8% and 6.3%, respectively, and in patients with or without radiotherapy was 42.7% and 23.1%, respectively. A multivariate model demonstrated non-GTR (HR 9.089, p < 0.001), no radiotherapy (HR 3.126, p = 0.004), and no chemotherapy (HR 3.621, p = 0.004) as independent adverse factors for poor OS. The 5-year OS in patients with GTR, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy was 72.1%, 44.0%, and 58.0%, respectively. In contrast, in patients without GTR, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy, the 5-year OS was 5.8%, 14.3%, and 15.8%, respectively. Overall, in patients receiving GTR plus chemoradiotherapy, the actuarial 5-year PFS and OS were both 87.5%.

CONCLUSIONS

MEPL is a rare neoplastic entity with a poor prognosis. There are no distinguishing radiological features apart from cystic degeneration. Via the pooled analysis, the authors identified independent adjustable factors associated with PFS and OS, from which they advocate for GTR plus chemoradiotherapy with a sufficient dose if tolerable as an optimal treatment to improve outcomes. Future studies with large cohorts will be necessary to verify our findings.

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Jian-Cong Weng, Lai-Rong Song, Da Li, Liang Wang, Zhen Wu, Jun-Mei Wang, Gui-Lin Li, Wang Jia, Li-Wei Zhang and Jun-Ting Zhang

OBJECTIVE

Primary intracranial myxomas (PICMs) are extremely rare neoplasms, and their management and prognostic factors remain ambiguous. The authors aimed to elaborate the radiological features, evaluate the risk factors for progression-free survival (PFS), and propose a treatment protocol based on pooled data from cases treated at their institute and those found in the literature.

METHODS

Clinical data from all cases of PICMs treated at the authors’ institute and those cases reported in the English-language literature between 1987 and December 2017 were reviewed. The authors searched the Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, and Cochrane databases using the keywords “myxoma” and “central nervous system,” “intracranial,” “cerebral,” “skull base,” “skull,” or “brain.” Previously published data were processed and used according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Risk factors in the pooled cohort were evaluated.

RESULTS

Cases from the authors’ institute included 21 males and 9 females, with a mean age of 35.7 ± 1.7 years. Gross-total resection (GTR) and non-GTR were achieved in 6 (20.0%) and 24 (80.0%) patients, respectively. After a mean follow-up of 86.7 ± 14.1 months, recurrence occurred in 6 (24%) patients, for a median PFS time of 85.2 months (range 36.0–136.0 months) and no deaths. In the literature between 1987 and 2017, 35 cases of PICM were identified in 14 males and 21 females with a mean age of 31.7 ± 3.2 years. GTR and non-GTR were achieved in 23 (65.7%) and 9 (25.7%) cases, respectively. After a mean follow-up of 25.8 ± 6.9 months (range 1.0–156.0 months), recurrence occurred in 4 (14.3%) patients, for a median PFS time of 11.0 months (range 3.0–36.0 months) and no deaths. Actuarial PFS rates at 1, 5, and 10 years were 93.0%, 80.6%, and 67.9%, respectively. A multivariate model demonstrated that GTR (HR 0.058, 95% CI 0.005–0.680, p = 0.023) was the only factor that favored PFS.

CONCLUSIONS

PICMs are rare neoplasms with a slightly higher occurrence in males. GTR was the only favorable factor for PFS. Based on statistical results, GTR alone, if tolerable, is advocated as the optimal treatment for PICM. Nevertheless, conservative excision may be preferred to avoid damage to vital structures. PICMs have a tendency to recur within a few years of the initial surgery if resection is incomplete; therefore, close postoperative follow-up is mandatory. Future studies with larger cohorts are necessary to verify the study findings.

Systematic review registration no.: CRD42018091517 (www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/)

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Jian-Cong Weng, Da Li, Liang Wang, Zhen Wu, Jun-Mei Wang, Gui-Lin Li, Wang Jia, Li-Wei Zhang and Jun-Ting Zhang

OBJECTIVE

Intracranial giant cell tumors (GCTs) are extremely rare neoplasms with dismal survival and recurrence rates. The authors aimed to confirm independent adverse factors for progression-free survival (PFS) and to propose an optimal treatment algorithm.

METHODS

The authors reviewed the clinical data of 43 cases of intracranial GCTs in their series. They also reviewed 90 cases of previously reported GCTs in the English language between 1982 and 2017 using Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, and Cochrane databases with keywords of “giant cell tumor” or “osteoclastoma” and “skull,” “skull base,” “temporal,” “frontal,” “sphenoid,” or “occipital.” These prior publication data were processed and used according to PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Aforementioned risk factors for the authors’ series and the pooled cases were evaluated in patients not lost to follow-up (m = 38 and n = 128, respectively).

RESULTS

The authors’ cohort included 28 males and 15 females with a mean age of 30.5 years. Gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in 15 (34.9%) patients. Fifteen patients (39.5%) who did not undergo GTR received postoperative radiotherapy with a mean total dose of 54.7 ± 4.1 Gy. After a mean follow-up of 71.3 months, 12 (31.6%) patients experienced recurrence, and 4 (10.5%) died of disease. The actuarial 5-year PFS and overall survival (OS) were 68.6% and 90.0% in the authors’ cohort, respectively. A multivariate Cox regression analysis verified that partial resection (HR 7.909, 95% CI 2.296–27.247, p = 0.001), no radiotherapy (HR 0.114, 95% CI 0.023–0.568, p = 0.008), and Ki-67 ≥ 10% (HR 7.816, 95% CI 1.584–38.575, p = 0.012) were independent adverse factors for PFS. Among the 90 cases in the literature, GTR was achieved in 49 (54.4%) cases. Radiotherapy was administered to 33 (36.7%) patients with a mean total dose of 47.1 ± 5.6 Gy. After a mean follow-up of 31.5 months, recurrence and death occurred in 17 (18.9%) and 5 (5.6%) cases, respectively. Among the pooled cases, the 5-year PFS and OS were 69.6% and 89.2%, respectively. A multivariate model demonstrated that partial resection (HR 4.792, 95% CI 2.909–7.893, p < 0.001) and no radiotherapy (HR 0.165, 95% CI 0.065–0.423, p < 0.001) were independent adverse factors for poor PFS.

CONCLUSIONS

GTR and radiotherapy were independent favorable factors for PFS of intracranial GCTs. Based on these findings, GTR alone or GTR plus radiotherapy was advocated as an optimal treatment; otherwise, partial resection plus radiotherapy with a dose ≥ 45 Gy, if tolerable, was a secondary alternative. Lack of randomized data of the study was stressed, and future studies with larger cohorts are necessary to verify these findings.

Systematic review no.: CRD42018090878 (crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/)

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Ali Liu, Jun-Mei Wang, Gui-Lin Li, Yi-Lin Sun, Shi-Bin Sun, Bin Luo and Mei-Hua Wang

Object

The goal of this study was to assess the clinical and pathological features of benign brain tumors that had been treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) followed by resection.

Methods

In this retrospective chart review, the authors identified 61 patients with intracranial benign tumors who had undergone neurosurgical intervention after GKS. Of these 61 patients, 27 were male and 34 were female; mean age was 49.1 years (range 19–73 years). There were 24 meningiomas, 18 schwannomas, 14 pituitary adenomas, 3 hemangioblastomas, and 2 craniopharyngiomas. The interval between GKS and craniotomy was 2–168 months, with a median of 24 months; for 7 patients, the interval was 10 years or longer. For 21 patients, a craniotomy was performed before and after GKS; in 9 patients, pathological specimens were obtained before and after GKS. A total of 29 patients underwent GKS at the Beijing Tiantan Hospital. All specimens obtained by surgical intervention underwent histopathological examination.

Results

Most patients underwent craniotomy because of tumor recurrence and/or exacerbation of clinical signs and symptoms. Neuroimaging analyses indicated tumor growth in 42 patients, hydrocephalus in 10 patients with vestibular schwannoma, cystic formation with mass effect in 7 patients, and tumor hemorrhage in 13 patients, of whom 10 had pituitary adenoma. Pathological examination demonstrated that, regardless of the type of tumor, GKS mainly induced coagulative necrosis of tumor parenchyma and stroma with some apoptosis and, ultimately, scar formation. In addition, irradiation induced vasculature stenosis and occlusion and tumor degeneration as a result of reduced blood supply. GKS-induced vasculature reaction was rarely observed in patients with pituitary adenoma. Pathological analysis of tumor specimens obtained before and after GKS did not indicate increased tumor proliferation after GKS.

Conclusions

Radiosurgery is effective for intracranial benign tumors of small size and deep location and for tumor recurrence after surgical intervention; it is not effective for intracranial tumors with symptomatic mass effect. The radiobiological effects of stereotactic radiosurgery on the benign tumors are mainly caused by cellular and vascular mechanisms. Among the patients in this study, high-dose irradiation did not increase tumor proliferation. GKS can induce primary and secondary effects in tumors, which could last more than 10 years, thereby warranting long-term follow-up after GKS.

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Jing-Jie Zheng, Gui-Jun Zhang, Xu-Lei Huo, Liang Wang, Shu-Yu Hao, Li-Wei Zhang, Zhen Wu, Yu-Mei Wu, Jun-Ting Zhang and Da Li

OBJECTIVE

Primary intracranial rhabdomyosarcoma (PIRMS) is rare, and the effects of the treatment strategy on overall survival (OS) are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate risk factors pertinent to OS and to propose an optimal treatment strategy.

METHODS

Clinical data of patients with PIRMS treated at Beijing Tiantan Hospital and from the English-language literature between 1946 and 2018 were reviewed. A literature review was performed via Ovid, MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases using the terms “rhabdomyosarcoma,” “intracranial,” “cerebral,” and “brain.” Previously published data were processed and used according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines.

RESULTS

There were 8 males (66.7%) and 4 females with PIRMS at our institution, with a mean age of 24.3 years. Gross-total resection was achieved in 4 patients (33.3%), and adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy were administered in 5 (45.5%) and 3 (27.3%) patients, respectively. After a mean follow-up period of 13.7 months, all patients developed local-regional recurrence and died of the disease. Twenty-nine cases (14 female and 15 male) were reported in the literature with a median age of 9.0 years. After a mean follow-up duration of 18.6 months, 13 patients (44.8%) developed recurrences, 7 patients (24.1%) had extracranial metastasis, and 14 patients (48.3%) died. In the pooled cases, adjuvant radiation (hazard ratio [HR] 0.089, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.027–0.288, p < 0.001) and age < 10 years (HR 0.227, 95% CI 0.077–0.666, p = 0.007) were independent predictors of good local-regional progression-free survival (LR-PFS). Adjuvant radiation therapy (HR 0.301, 95% CI 0.110–0.828, p = 0.020) and age < 10 years (HR 0.359, 95% CI 0.131–0.983, p = 0.046) were significant predictors for favorable OS in the multivariate model.

CONCLUSIONS

Due to the rarity of the disease, a poor outcome of PIRMS was demonstrated based on the pooled cohort. Use of radiation was associated with improved outcomes and should be considered to improve OS/LR-PFS. Further study is required to identify the optimal treatment regimen.

Systematic review no.: CRD42019121249 (crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/)