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Aygül Mert, Barbara Kiesel, Adelheid Wöhrer, Mauricio Martínez-Moreno, Georgi Minchev, Julia Furtner, Engelbert Knosp, Stefan Wolfsberger, and Georg Widhalm

OBJECT

Surgery of suspected low-grade gliomas (LGGs) poses a special challenge for neurosurgeons due to their diffusely infiltrative growth and histopathological heterogeneity. Consequently, neuronavigation with multimodality imaging data, such as structural and metabolic data, fiber tracking, and 3D brain visualization, has been proposed to optimize surgery. However, currently no standardized protocol has been established for multimodality imaging data in modern glioma surgery. The aim of this study was therefore to define a specific protocol for multimodality imaging and navigation for suspected LGG.

METHODS

Fifty-one patients who underwent surgery for a diffusely infiltrating glioma with nonsignificant contrast enhancement on MRI and available multimodality imaging data were included. In the first 40 patients with glioma, the authors retrospectively reviewed the imaging data, including structural MRI (contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and FLAIR sequences), metabolic images derived from PET, or MR spectroscopy chemical shift imaging, fiber tracking, and 3D brain surface/vessel visualization, to define standardized image settings and specific indications for each imaging modality. The feasibility and surgical relevance of this new protocol was subsequently prospectively investigated during surgery with the assistance of an advanced electromagnetic navigation system in the remaining 11 patients. Furthermore, specific surgical outcome parameters, including the extent of resection, histological analysis of the metabolic hotspot, presence of a new postoperative neurological deficit, and intraoperative accuracy of 3D brain visualization models, were assessed in each of these patients.

RESULTS

After reviewing these first 40 cases of glioma, the authors defined a specific protocol with standardized image settings and specific indications that allows for optimal and simultaneous visualization of structural and metabolic data, fiber tracking, and 3D brain visualization. This new protocol was feasible and was estimated to be surgically relevant during navigation-guided surgery in all 11 patients. According to the authors' predefined surgical outcome parameters, they observed a complete resection in all resectable gliomas (n = 5) by using contour visualization with T2-weighted or FLAIR images. Additionally, tumor tissue derived from the metabolic hotspot showed the presence of malignant tissue in all WHO Grade III or IV gliomas (n = 5). Moreover, no permanent postoperative neurological deficits occurred in any of these patients, and fiber tracking and/or intraoperative monitoring were applied during surgery in the vast majority of cases (n = 10). Furthermore, the authors found a significant intraoperative topographical correlation of 3D brain surface and vessel models with gyral anatomy and superficial vessels. Finally, real-time navigation with multimodality imaging data using the advanced electromagnetic navigation system was found to be useful for precise guidance to surgical targets, such as the tumor margin or the metabolic hotspot.

CONCLUSIONS

In this study, the authors defined a specific protocol for multimodality imaging data in suspected LGGs, and they propose the application of this new protocol for advanced navigation-guided procedures optimally in conjunction with continuous electromagnetic instrument tracking to optimize glioma surgery.

Free access

Barbara Kiesel, Matthias Millesi, Adelheid Woehrer, Julia Furtner, Anahita Bavand, Thomas Roetzer, Mario Mischkulnig, Stefan Wolfsberger, Matthias Preusser, Engelbert Knosp, and Georg Widhalm

OBJECTIVE

Stereotactic needle biopsies are usually performed for histopathological confirmation of intracranial lymphomas to guide adequate treatment. During biopsy, intraoperative histopathology is an effective tool to avoid acquisition of nondiagnostic samples. In the last years, 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA)–induced fluorescence has been increasingly used for visualization of diagnostic brain tumor tissue during stereotactic biopsies. Recently, visible fluorescence was reported in the first cases of intracranial lymphomas as well. The aim of this study is thus to investigate the technical and clinical utility of 5-ALA–induced fluorescence in a large series of stereotactic biopsies for intracranial lymphoma.

METHODS

This prospective study recruited adult patients who underwent frameless stereotactic needle biopsy for a radiologically suspected intracranial lymphoma after oral 5-ALA administration. During biopsy, samples from the tumor region were collected for histopathological analysis, and presence of fluorescence (strong, vague, or no fluorescence) was assessed with a modified neurosurgical microscope. In tumors with available biopsy samples from at least 2 different regions the intratumoral fluorescence homogeneity was additionally investigated. Furthermore, the influence of potential preoperative corticosteroid treatment or immunosuppression on fluorescence was analyzed. Histopathological tumor diagnosis was established and all collected biopsy samples were screened for diagnostic lymphoma tissue.

RESULTS

The final study cohort included 41 patients with intracranial lymphoma. Stereotactic biopsies with assistance of 5-ALA were technically feasible in all cases. Strong fluorescence was found as maximum level in 30 patients (75%), vague fluorescence in 2 patients (4%), and no visible fluorescence in 9 patients (21%). In 28 cases, samples were obtained from at least 2 different tumor regions; homogenous intratumoral fluorescence was found in 16 of those cases (57%) and inhomogeneous intratumoral fluorescence in 12 (43%). According to histopathological analysis, all samples with strong or vague fluorescence contained diagnostic lymphoma tissue, resulting in a positive predictive value of 100%. Analysis showed no influence of preoperative corticosteroids or immunosuppression on fluorescence.

CONCLUSIONS

The data obtained in this study demonstrate the technical and clinical utility of 5-ALA–induced fluorescence in stereotactic biopsies of intracranial lymphomas. Thus, 5-ALA can serve as a useful tool to select patients not requiring intraoperative histopathology, and its application should markedly reduce operation time and related costs in the future.

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Matthias Millesi, Barbara Kiesel, Vanessa Mazanec, Lisa I. Wadiura, Adelheid Wöhrer, Johannes Herta, Stefan Wolfsberger, Klaus Novak, Julia Furtner, Karl Rössler, Engelbert Knosp, and Georg Widhalm

OBJECTIVE

Gross-total resection (GTR) is the treatment of choice in the majority of patients suffering from spinal ependymal tumors. In such tumors, the extent of resection (EOR) is considered the key factor for tumor recurrence and thus patient prognosis. However, incomplete resection is not uncommon and leads to increased risk of tumor recurrence. One important cause of incomplete resection is insufficient intraoperative visualization of tumor tissue as well as residual tumor tissue. Therefore, the authors investigated the value of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA)–induced fluorescence in a series of spinal ependymal tumors for improved tumor visualization.

METHODS

Adult patients who underwent preoperative 5-ALA administration and surgery for a spinal ependymal tumor were included in this study. For each tumor, a conventional white-light microsurgical resection was performed. Additionally, the fluorescence status (strong, vague, or no fluorescence) and fluorescence homogeneity (homogenous or inhomogeneous) of the spinal ependymal tumors were evaluated during surgery using a modified neurosurgical microscope. In intramedullary tumor cases with assumed GTR, the resection cavity was investigated for potential residual fluorescing foci under white-light microscopy. In cases with residual fluorescing foci, these areas were safely resected and the corresponding samples were histopathologically screened for the presence of tumor tissue.

RESULTS

In total, 31 spinal ependymal tumors, including 27 intramedullary tumors and 4 intradural extramedullary tumors, were included in this study. Visible fluorescence was observed in the majority of spinal ependymal tumors (n = 25, 81%). Of those, strong fluorescence was noted in 23 of these cases (92%), whereas vague fluorescence was present in 2 cases (8%). In contrast, no fluorescence was observed in the remaining 6 tumors (19%). Most ependymal tumors demonstrated an inhomogeneous fluorescence effect (17 of 25 cases, 68%). After assumed GTR in intramedullary tumors (n = 15), unexpected residual fluorescing foci within the resection cavity could be detected in 5 tumors (33%). These residual fluorescing foci histopathologically corresponded to residual tumor tissue in all cases.

CONCLUSIONS

This study indicates that 5-ALA fluorescence makes it possible to visualize the majority of spinal ependymal tumors during surgery. Unexpected residual tumor tissue could be detected with the assistance of 5-ALA fluorescence in approximately one-third of analyzed intramedullary tumors. Thus, 5-ALA fluorescence might be useful to increase the EOR, particularly in intramedullary ependymal tumors, in order to reduce the risk of tumor recurrence.

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Domenique M. J. Müller, Pierre A. Robe, Hilko Ardon, Frederik Barkhof, Lorenzo Bello, Mitchel S. Berger, Wim Bouwknegt, Wimar A. Van den Brink, Marco Conti Nibali, Roelant S. Eijgelaar, Julia Furtner, Seunggu J. Han, Shawn L. Hervey-Jumper, Albert J. S. Idema, Barbara Kiesel, Alfred Kloet, Jan C. De Munck, Marco Rossi, Tommaso Sciortino, W. Peter Vandertop, Martin Visser, Michiel Wagemakers, Georg Widhalm, Marnix G. Witte, Aeilko H. Zwinderman, and Philip C. De Witt Hamer

OBJECTIVE

Decisions in glioblastoma surgery are often guided by presumed eloquence of the tumor location. The authors introduce the “expected residual tumor volume” (eRV) and the “expected resectability index” (eRI) based on previous decisions aggregated in resection probability maps. The diagnostic accuracy of eRV and eRI to predict biopsy decisions, resectability, functional outcome, and survival was determined.

METHODS

Consecutive patients with first-time glioblastoma surgery in 2012–2013 were included from 12 hospitals. The eRV was calculated from the preoperative MR images of each patient using a resection probability map, and the eRI was derived from the tumor volume. As reference, Sawaya’s tumor location eloquence grades (EGs) were classified. Resectability was measured as observed extent of resection (EOR) and residual volume, and functional outcome as change in Karnofsky Performance Scale score. Receiver operating characteristic curves and multivariable logistic regression were applied.

RESULTS

Of 915 patients, 674 (74%) underwent a resection with a median EOR of 97%, functional improvement in 71 (8%), functional decline in 78 (9%), and median survival of 12.8 months. The eRI and eRV identified biopsies and EORs of at least 80%, 90%, or 98% better than EG. The eRV and eRI predicted observed residual volumes under 10, 5, and 1 ml better than EG. The eRV, eRI, and EG had low diagnostic accuracy for functional outcome changes. Higher eRV and lower eRI were strongly associated with shorter survival, independent of known prognostic factors.

CONCLUSIONS

The eRV and eRI predict biopsy decisions, resectability, and survival better than eloquence grading and may be useful preoperative indices to support surgical decisions.