Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Joseph Lopez x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Katharine D. Harper, Dayna Phillips, Joseph M. Lopez and Zeeshan Sardar

Although compartment syndrome can occur in any compartment in the body, it rarely occurs in the paraspinal musculature and has therefore only been reported in a few case reports. Despite its rare occurrence, acute paraspinal compartment syndrome has been shown to occur secondary to reperfusion injury and traumatic and atraumatic causes. Diagnosis can be based on clinical examination findings, MRI or CT studies, or through direct measurement of intramuscular pressures. Conservative management should only be used in the setting of chronic presentation. Operative decompression via fasciotomy in cases of acute presentation may improve the patient’s symptoms and outcomes. When treating acute paraspinal compartment syndrome via surgical decompression, an important aspect is the anatomical consideration. Although grouped under one name, each paraspinal muscle is enclosed within its own fascial compartment, all of which must be addressed to achieve an adequate decompression. The authors present the case of a 43-year-old female patient who presented to the emergency department with increasing low-back and flank pain after a fall. Associated sensory deficits in a cutaneous distribution combined with imaging and clinical findings contributed to the diagnosis of acute traumatic paraspinal compartment syndrome. The authors discuss this case and describe their surgical technique for managing acute paraspinal compartment syndrome.

Full access

Alan F. Utria, Joseph Lopez, Regina S. Cho, Gerhard S. Mundinger, George I. Jallo, Edward S. Ahn, Craig Vander Kolk and Amir H. Dorafshar

OBJECTIVE

Due to the changing properties of the infant skull, there is still no clear consensus on the ideal time to surgically intervene in cases of nonsyndromic craniosynostosis (NSC). This study aims to shed light on how patient age at the time of surgery may affect surgical outcomes and the subsequent need for reoperation.

METHODS

A retrospective cohort review was conducted for patients with NSC who underwent primary cranial vault remodeling between 1990 and 2013. Patients' demographic and clinical characteristics and surgical interventions were recorded. Postoperative outcomes were assessed by assigning each procedure to a Whitaker category. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the relationship between age at surgery and need for minor (Whitaker I or II) versus major (Whitaker III or IV) reoperation. Odds ratios (ORs) for Whitaker category by age at surgery were assigned.

RESULTS

A total of 413 unique patients underwent cranial vault remodeling procedures for NSC during the study period. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated increased odds of requiring major surgical revisions (Whitaker III or IV) in patients younger than 6 months of age (OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.05–5.93), and increased odds of requiring minimal surgical revisions (Whitaker I or II) in patients older than 6 months of age (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.16–6.41).

CONCLUSIONS

Timing, as a proxy for the changing properties of the infant skull, is an important factor to consider when planning vault reconstruction in NSC. The data presented in this study demonstrate that patients operated on before 6 months of age had increased odds of requiring major surgical revisions.

Full access

Miguel Gelabert-González, Eduardo Arán-Echabe and José María Santín-Amo

Restricted access

Robert Lynagh, Mark Ishak, Joseph Georges, Danielle Lopez, Hany Osman, Michael Kakareka, Brandon Boyer, H. Warren Goldman, Jennifer Eschbacher, Mark C. Preul, Peter Nakaji, Alan Turtz, Steven Yocom and Denah Appelt

OBJECTIVE

Accurate histopathological diagnoses are often necessary for treating neuro-oncology patients. However, stereotactic biopsy (STB), a common method for obtaining suspicious tissue from deep or eloquent brain regions, fails to yield diagnostic tissue in some cases. Failure to obtain diagnostic tissue can delay initiation of treatment and may result in further invasive procedures for patients. In this study, the authors sought to determine if the coupling of in vivo optical imaging with an STB system is an effective method for identification of diagnostic tissue at the time of biopsy.

METHODS

A minimally invasive fiber optic imaging system was developed by coupling a 0.65-mm-diameter coherent fiber optic fluorescence microendoscope to an STB system. Human U251 glioma cells were transduced for stable expression of blue fluorescent protein (BFP) to produce U251-BFP cells that were utilized for in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro, blue fluorescence was confirmed, and tumor cell delineation by fluorescein sodium (FNa) was quantified with fluorescence microscopy. In vivo, transgenic athymic rats implanted with U251-BFP cells (n = 4) were utilized for experiments. Five weeks postimplantation, the rats received 5–10 mg/kg intravenous FNa and underwent craniotomies overlying the tumor implantation site and contralateral normal brain. A clinical STB needle containing our 0.65-mm imaging fiber was passed through each craniotomy and images were collected. Fluorescence images from regions of interest ipsilateral and contralateral to tumor implantation were obtained and quantified.

RESULTS

Live-cell fluorescence imaging confirmed blue fluorescence from transduced tumor cells and revealed a strong correlation between tumor cells quantified by blue fluorescence and FNa contrast (R2 = 0.91, p < 0.001). Normalized to background, in vivo FNa-mediated fluorescence intensity was significantly greater from tumor regions, verified by blue fluorescence, compared to contralateral brain in all animals (301.7 ± 34.18 relative fluorescence units, p < 0.001). Fluorescence intensity measured from the tumor margin was not significantly greater than that from normal brain (p = 0.89). Biopsies obtained from regions of strong fluorescein contrast were histologically consistent with tumor.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors found that in vivo fluorescence imaging with an STB needle containing a submillimeter-diameter fiber optic fluorescence microendoscope provided direct visualization of neoplastic tissue in an animal brain tumor model prior to biopsy. These results were confirmed in vivo with positive control cells and by post hoc histological assessment. In vivo fluorescence guidance may improve the diagnostic yield of stereotactic biopsies.

Restricted access

Oral Presentations

2010 AANS Annual Meeting Philadelphia, Pennsylvania May 1–5, 2010