Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Joseph A. Osorio x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Darryl Lau, Joseph A. Osorio, Vedat Deviren and Christopher P. Ames

OBJECTIVE

Three-column osteotomies are increasingly being used in the elderly population to correct rigid spinal deformities. There is hesitation, however, in performing the technique in older patients because of the high risk for blood loss, longer operative times, and complications. This study assesses whether age alone is an independent risk factor for complications and length of stay.

METHODS

All patients with thoracolumbar adult spinal deformity (ASD) who underwent 3-column osteotomy (vertebral column resection or pedicle subtraction osteotomy) performed by the senior author from 2006 to 2016 were identified. Demographics, clinical baseline, and surgical details were collected. Outcomes of interest included perioperative complication, ICU stay, and hospital stay. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the association of age with outcomes of interest.

RESULTS

A total of 300 patients were included, and 38.3% were male. The mean age was 63.7 years: 10.3% of patients were younger than 50 years, 36.0% were 50–64 years, 45.7% were 65–79 years, and 8.0% were 80 years or older. The overall mean EBL was 1999 ml. The overall perioperative complication rate was 24.7%: 18.0% had a medical complication and 7.0% had a surgical complication. There were no perioperative or 30-day deaths. Age was associated with overall complications (p = 0.002) and medical-specific complications (p < 0.001); there were higher rates of overall and medical complications with increased age: 9.7% and 6.5%, respectively, for patients younger than 50 years; 16.7% and 10.2%, respectively, for patients 50–64 years; 31.4% and 22.6%, respectively, for patients 65–79 years; and 41.7% and 41.7%, respectively, for patients 80 years or older. However, after adjusting for relevant covariates on multivariate analysis, age was not an independent factor for perioperative complications. Surgical complication rates were similar among the 4 age groups. Longer ICU and total hospital stays were observed in older age groups, and age was an independent factor associated with longer ICU stay (p = 0.028) and total hospital stay (p = 0.003). ICU stays among the 4 age groups were 1.6, 2.3, 2.0, and 3.2 days for patients younger than 50 years, 50–64 years, 65–79 years, and 80 years or older, respectively. The total hospital stays stratified by age were 7.3, 7.7, 8.2, and 11.0 days for patients younger than 50 years, 50–64 years, 65–79 years, and 80 years or older, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Older age was associated with higher perioperative complication rates, but age alone was not an independent risk factor for complications following the 3-column osteotomy for ASD. Comorbidities and other unknown variables that come with age are likely what put these patients at higher risk for complications. Older age, however, is independently associated with longer ICU and hospital stays.

Full access

Shawn L. Hervey-Jumper, Jing Li, Joseph A. Osorio, Darryl Lau, Annette M. Molinaro, Arnau Benet and Mitchel S. Berger

OBJECT

Though challenging, maximal safe resection of insular gliomas enhances overall and progression-free survival and deters malignant transformation. Previously published reports have shown that surgery can be performed with low morbidity. The authors previously described a Berger-Sanai zone classification system for insular gliomas. Using a subsequent dataset, they undertook this study to validate this zone classification system for predictability of extent of resection (EOR) in patients with insular gliomas.

METHODS

The study population included adults who had undergone resection of WHO Grade II, III, or IV insular gliomas. In accordance with our prior published report, tumor location was classified according to the Berger-Sanai quadrant-style classification system into Zones I through IV. Interobserver variability was analyzed using a cohort of newly diagnosed insular gliomas and independent classification scores given by 3 neurosurgeons at various career stages. Glioma volumes were analyzed using FLAIR and T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR images.

RESULTS

One hundred twenty-nine procedures involving 114 consecutive patients were identified. The study population from the authors’ previously published experience included 115 procedures involving 104 patients. Thus, the total experience included 244 procedures involving 218 patients with insular gliomas treated at the authors’ institution. The most common presenting symptoms were seizure (68.2%) and asymptomatic recurrence (17.8%). WHO Grade II glioma histology was the most common (54.3%), followed by Grades III (34.1%) and IV (11.6%). The median tumor volume was 48.5 cm3. The majority of insular gliomas were located in the anterior portion of the insula with 31.0% in Zone I, 10.9% in Zone IV, and 16.3% in Zones I+IV. The Berger-Sanai zone classification system was highly reliable, with a kappa coefficient of 0.857. The median EOR for all zones was 85%. Comparison of EOR between the current and prior series showed no change and Zone I gliomas continue to have the highest median EOR. Short- and long-term neurological complications remain low, and zone classification correlated with short-term complications, which were highest in Zone I and in Giant insular gliomas.

CONCLUSIONS

The previously proposed Berger-Sanai classification system is highly reliable and predictive of insular glioma EOR and morbidity.

Restricted access

Michael M. Safaee, Vedat Deviren, Cecilia Dalle Ore, Justin K. Scheer, Darryl Lau, Joseph A. Osorio, Fred Nicholls and Christopher P. Ames

OBJECTIVE

Proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) is a well-recognized, yet incompletely defined, complication of adult spinal deformity surgery. There is no standardized definition for PJK, but most studies describe PJK as an increase in the proximal junctional angle (PJA) of greater than 10°–20°. Ligament augmentation is a novel strategy for PJK reduction that provides strength to the upper instrumented vertebra (UIV) and adjacent segments while also reducing junctional stress at those levels.

METHODS

In this study, ligament augmentation was used in a consecutive series of adult spinal deformity patients at a single institution. Patient demographics, including age; sex; indication for surgery; revision surgery; surgical approach; and use of 3-column osteotomies, vertebroplasty, or hook fixation at the UIV, were collected. The PJA was measured preoperatively and at last follow-up using 36-inch radiographs. Data on change in PJA and need for revision surgery were collected. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify factors associated with change in PJA and proximal junctional failure (PJF), defined as PJK requiring surgical correction.

RESULTS

A total of 200 consecutive patients were included: 100 patients before implementation of ligament augmentation and 100 patients after implementation of this technique. The mean age of the ligament augmentation cohort was 66 years, and 67% of patients were women. Over half of these cases (51%) were revision surgeries, with 38% involving a combined anterior or lateral and posterior approach. The mean change in PJA was 6° in the ligament augmentation group compared with 14° in the control group (p < 0.001). Eighty-four patients had a change in PJA of less than 10°. In a multivariate linear regression model, age (p = 0.016), use of hook fixation at the UIV (p = 0.045), and use of ligament augmentation (p < 0.001) were associated with a change in PJA. In a separate model, only ligament augmentation (OR 0.193, p = 0.012) showed a significant association with PJF.

CONCLUSIONS

Ligament augmentation represents a novel technique for the prevention of PJK and PJF. Compared with a well-matched historical cohort, ligament augmentation is associated with a significant decrease in PJK and PJF. These data support the implementation of ligament augmentation in surgery for adult spinal deformity, particularly in patients with a high risk of developing PJK and PJF.

Free access

Joseph A. Osorio, Jonathan D. Breshears, Omar Arnaout, Neil G. Simon, Ashley M. Hastings-Robinson, Pedram Aleshi and Michel Kliot

OBJECT

The objective of this study was to provide a technique that could be used in the preoperative period to facilitate the surgical exploration of peripheral nerve pathology.

METHODS

The authors describe a technique in which 1) ultrasonography is used in the immediate preoperative period to identify target peripheral nerves, 2) an ultrasound-guided needle electrode is used to stimulate peripheral nerves to confirm their position, and then 3) a methylene blue (MB) injection is performed to mark the peripheral nerve pathology to facilitate surgical exploration.

RESULTS

A cohort of 13 patients with varying indications for peripheral nerve surgery is presented in which ultrasound guidance, stimulation, and MB were used to localize and create a road map for surgeries.

CONCLUSIONS

Preoperative ultrasound-guided MB administration is a promising technique that peripheral nerve surgeons could use to plan and execute surgery.

Free access

Joseph A. Osorio, Michael M. Safaee, Jennifer Viner, Sujatha Sankaran, Sarah Imershein, Ezekiel Adigun, Gabriela Weigel, Mitchel S. Berger and Michael W. McDermott

OBJECTIVE

The authors’ institution is in the top 5th percentile for hospital cost in the nation, and the neurointensive care unit (NICU) is one of the costliest units. The NICU is more expensive than other units because of lower staff/patient ratio and because of the equipment necessary to monitor patient care. The cost differential between the NICU and Neuro transitional care unit (NTCU) is $1504 per day. The goal of this study was to evaluate and to pilot a program to improve efficiency and lower cost by modifying the postoperative care of patients who have undergone a craniotomy, sending them to the NTCU as opposed to the NICU. Implementation of the pilot will expand and utilize neurosurgery beds available on the NTCU and reduce the burden on NICU beds for critically ill patient admissions.

METHODS

Ten patients who underwent craniotomy to treat supratentorial brain tumors were included. Prior to implementation of the pilot, inclusion criteria were designed for patient selection. Patients included were less than 65 years of age, had no comorbid conditions requiring postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) care, had a supratentorial meningioma less than 3 cm in size, had no intraoperative events, had routine extubation, and underwent surgery lasting fewer than 5 hours and had blood loss less than 500 ml. The Safe Transitions Pathway (STP) was started in August 2016.

RESULTS

Ten tumor patients have utilized the STP (5 convexity meningiomas, 2 metastatic tumors, 3 gliomas). Patients’ ages ranged from 29 to 75 years (median 49 years; an exception to the age limit of 65 years was made for one 75-year-old patient). Discharge from the hospital averaged 2.2 days postoperative, with 1 discharged on postoperative day (POD) 1, 7 discharged on POD 2, 1 discharged on POD 3, and 1 discharged on POD 4. Preliminary data indicate that quality and safety for patients following the STP (moving from the operating room [OR] to the neuro transitional care unit [OR-NTCU]) are no different from those of patients following the traditional OR-NICU pathway. No patients required escalation in level of nursing care, and there were no readmissions. This group has been followed for greater than 1 month, and there were no morbidities.

CONCLUSIONS

The STP is a new and efficient pathway for the postoperative care of neurosurgery patients. The STP has reduced hospital cost by $22,560 for the first 10 patients, and there were no morbidities. Since this pilot, the authors have expanded the pathway to include other surgical cases and now routinely schedule craniotomy patients for the (OR-NTCU) pathway. The potential cost reduction in one year could reach $500,000 if we reach our potential of 20 patients per month.