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Jung-Il Lee, Do-Hyun Nam, Jong Soo Kim, Seung-Chyul Hong, Hyung-Jin Shin, Kwan Park, Whan Eoh, Yeon-Lim Suh and Jong Hyun Kim

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Seung-Chyul Hong, Kwan-Soo Kang, Dae Won Seo, Seung Bong Hong, Munhyang Lee, Do-Hyun Nam, Jung-Il Lee, Jong Soo Kim, Hyung-Jin Shin, Kwan Park, Whan Eoh, Yeon-Lim Suh and Jong-Hyun Kim

Object. Surgical treatment of cortical dysplasia (CD) together with intractable seizures is challenging because both visualization and localization of the lesion are difficult, correlation with seizure foci requires comprehensive study, and the surgical outcomes reported thus far are unsatisfactory. The authors report their experience in the surgical treatment of CD classified according to a surgical point of view.

Methods. The definition of CD used in this study was a dysplastic lesion visible on magnetic resonance (MR) images or a lesion that, although not visible on MR images, was diagnosed as moderate-to-severe dysplasia by using pathological analysis. During the last 4.5 years, the authors treated 36 patients with intractable epilepsy accompanied by CD. They divided the 36 cases of CD into four characteristic groups: Group A, diffuse bilateral hemispheric dysplasia; Group B, diffuse lobar dysplasia; Group C, focal dysplasia; and Group D, a moderate to severe degree of CD with a normal appearance on MR images. All but one patient in Group C were monitored in the epilepsy monitoring unit by using subdural electrodes for seizure localization and functional mapping.

The incidence of CD among a cohort of 291 patients who had undergone epilepsy surgery at the authors' center during the study period was 12.4%. The mean age of the 36 patients was 21.3 years and the mean age at seizure onset was 8.5 years. The mean follow-up period was 26 months. Twenty-six patients (72.2%) belonged to Engel Class I or II (20 and six, respectively). There were five cases in Group A, nine in Group B, nine in Group C, and 13 in Group D. Patients in Groups A and B were significantly younger at seizure onset and had significantly poorer surgical outcomes compared with patients in Groups C and D (p < 0.05). If outcome is compared on the basis of the extent of removal of CD, patients in whom CD was completely removed had significantly better outcomes than those in whom CD was only partially removed (p < 0.001).

Conclusions. The authors conclude that intractable epilepsy accompanied by CD can be treated surgically using comprehensive preoperative approaches. Deliberate resective procedures aimed at complete removal of dysplastic tissue ensure excellent seizure control without permanent neurological deficit.

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Young Mi Yoo, Yong Jung Kim, Uhn Lee, Doo Jin Paik, Hyun Tae Yoo, Cheol Wan Park, Young Bo Kim, Sang Goo Lee, Woo Kyung Kim and Chan Jong Yoo

Object

Parkinson disease (PD) is a well-known degenerative disease resulting in the depletion of dopamine-producing neurons in the pars compacta of the substantia nigra. Adenoviral vector delivery of neurotrophic factors may provide a potential therapy for PD. The authors examined whether glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) delivered via adenoviral vector (Ad-GDNF) could promote functional recovery in a rat model of PD. Additionally, they examined whether neural precursor cells (NPCs) provide the therapeutic potential of cultured neural cells for cell regeneration and replacement in PD.

Methods

All animals underwent stereotactic injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into the right substantia nigra. Eight weeks later, the rats were tested for apomorphine-induced rotational asymmetry and evaluation of explanted grafts infected with the complementary DNA for GDNF containing NPCs and NPCs alone. In the NPC cultures of embryonic rat striata, the authors found that basic fibroblast growth factor induced the proliferation of stem cells, which give rise to spheres of undifferentiated cells that generate neurons and glia.

Conclusions

In this study the authors found that the reduction of apomorphine-induced rotation was more prominent in parkinsonian rats that received Ad-GDNF-treated grafts containing NPCs (61%) than in those that received grafts of NPCs alone (16%).

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Taek-Kyun Nam, Jung-Il Lee, Young-Jo Jung, Yong-Seok Im, Hee-Ye An, Do-Hyun Nam, Kwan Park and Jong-Hyun Kim

Object. This study was performed to evaluate the role of gamma knife surgery (GKS) in patients with a large number (four or more) of metastatic brain lesions.

Methods. The authors retrospectively reviewed the outcome in 130 patients who underwent GKS for metastatic lesions. Eighty-four patients presented with one to three lesions (Group A) and 46 presented with four or more lesions (Group B). The overall median survival time after GKS was 35 weeks. The median survival time in Group A (48 weeks) was significantly longer (p = 0.005) than the survival time in Group B (26 weeks). The recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class was the only significant prognostic factor identified in multivariate analysis. The median survival for patients in RPA Classes I, II, and III was 72, 48, and 19 weeks, respectively, in Group A and 36 and 13 weeks for Classes II and III in Group B. The number of lesions, tumor volume, whole brain radiotherapy, primary tumor site, age, and sex did not affect survival significantly.

Conclusions. It is suggested that GKS provides an increase in survival time even in patients with a large number (four or more) of metastatic lesions. Concerning the selection of patients for GKS, RPA class should be considered as the most important factor and multiplicity of the lesions alone should not be a reason for withholding GKS.

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Chang Sub Lee, Seok Ho Hong, Kyu-Chang Wang, Seung-Ki Kim, Joong Shin Park, Jong-Kwan Jun, Bo Hyun Yoon, Young-Ho Lee, Son Moon Shin, Yeon Kyung Lee and Byung-Kyu Cho

Object

The prognosis of fetal ventriculomegaly (FVM) varies because of the disease’s heterogeneity and the diversity of accompanying anomalies. Moreover, the cases that are referred to neurosurgeons may have different clinical features from those typically encountered by obstetricians. The object of this study was to delineate the prognosis of FVM in cases for which neurosurgical consultation was sought.

Methods

Forty-four cases of FVM that were diagnosed before birth and referred to neurosurgeons for prenatal consultation were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty-five of the 44 patients had accompanying anomalies, but in only three (12%) of the cases were they detected prenatally. Postnatal imaging studies revealed that agenesis of the corpus callosum (nine cases) was the most common associated anomaly. Neuronal migration disorders, periventricular leukomalacia, and arachnoid cysts were present in four cases each, and aqueductal stenosis was present in three cases.

Thirty-three patients were followed up longer than 11 months; in 15 (45%) delayed cognitive and/or motor development was documented, and all had accompanying anomalies. All 10 of the patients with isolated FVM exhibited normal development during the follow-up period. Eleven (25%) of the 44 patients underwent neurosurgical interventions for ventriculomegaly, which included ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement in seven cases. Four patients (9%) died.

Conclusions

The authors conclude that delayed development and disturbed functional status in patients in whom FVM was diagnosed prenatally are closely related to the presence of certain accompanying anomalies. On postnatal examination, more than half of the patients in whom the diagnosis of FVM was based on ultrasonography findings and whose parents were offered prenatal neurosurgical consultation were found to have additional anomalies that were not detected prenatally. Because of the possibility of additional undiagnosed anomalies, consulting neurosurgeons should be cautious in giving a prognosis in cases of FVM, even when prenatal ultrasonography reveals isolated ventriculomegaly and tests for intrauterine infection and chromosomal abnormality yield negative results.

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Doo-Sik Kong, Do-Hyun Nam, Jung-Il Lee, Kwan Park and Jong Hyun Kim

Object

The authors conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) followed by radiotherapy for the treatment of unresectable glioblastomas multiforme (GBMs) on patient survival and quality of life.

Methods

A total of 19 patients with unresectable GBMs located in eloquent areas of the brain were eligible for this study. Beginning in January 2002, 10 patients underwent GKS followed by fractionated radiotherapy. Nine patients who had undergone radiotherapy alone after biopsy-proven diagnosis served as the control group. The mean patient ages were 53 years and 56 years, respectively. Preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) scores were 80 (range 60–100) and 90 (range 50–100), respectively. The median margin dose for GKS was 12 Gy (9–16 Gy), and the total dose for radiotherapy was 60 Gy in 30 fractions. The mean follow-up duration was 7.2 months, the median patient survival time was 52 weeks (95% confidence interval [CI] 22–110.6 weeks) in the GKS group, and the median overall survival time was 28 weeks (95% CI 22.5–33.5 weeks) in the control group. The difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.0758). The estimated progression-free survival rate at 3 months was 75% in the GKS group and 45% in the control group (p = 0.082). The posttreatment KPS scores were either unchanged or improved in the GKS group, whereas it deteriorated by 20 or more points in six of nine patients of the control group (p = 0.004).

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery prior to radiotherapy may be helpful in preserving patients' daily activities in the adjuvant management of unresectable GBM.

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Doo-Sik Kong, Do-Hyun Nam, Jung-Il Lee, Kwan Park, Jong Hyun Kim and Hyung Jin Shin

Object

It is important to differentiate growing teratoma syndrome (GTS) from tumor recurrence in the setting of an enlarging residual mass present after treatment of intracranial germ cell tumors (GCTs). The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of intracranial GTS and present its clinical manifestations in detail.

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective cohort study of 52 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed intracranial GCTs who presented between January 2000 and December 2006. The records were screened to identify a study cohort in which all patients had regrowing tumor mass despite normalization of tumor markers during or after treatment of GCTs.

Results

In 6 (11.5%) of 52 patients the pathological diagnosis was GTS. The median patient age at diagnosis was 14.5 years (range 2 months–17 years), and the primary tumors included 4 mixed GCTs and 2 immature teratomas. After second-look surgery, histological testing revealed the lesions to be mature teratoma in all patients. Three of 6 patients subsequently underwent radiation therapy and 1 patient received additional chemotherapy for spinal seeding.

Conclusions

In enlarging residual masses after treatment of intracranial GCTs, GTS should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of tumor recurrence especially if there is a radiographic mismatch with serum marker test results. If technically feasible, second-look surgery may be necessary for an accurate diagnosis.

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Yong Ahn, Jin Uk Kim, Byung Hoi Lee, Sang-Ho Lee, Jong Dae Park, Dong Hyun Hong and June Ho Lee

Object

The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the clinical characteristics of postoperative retroperitoneal hematoma (RPH) following transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and to discuss how to prevent the complication of unintended hemorrhage.

Methods

The medical records of 412 consecutive patients treated with transforaminal PELD between January 2005 and May 2007 were reviewed. A total of 4 patients (0.97%) experienced symptomatic postoperative RPH. The clinical outcomes were evaluated using the visual analog scale and the Oswestry Disability Index.

Results

The common symptom in all patients with a hematoma was inguinal pain. The mean hematoma volume was 527.9 ml (range 53.3–1274.1 ml). Two patients with massive diffuse-type RPHs compressing the intraabdominal structures required open hematoma evacuation performed by general surgeons, and the other 2 patients with small, localized RPHs of < 100 ml were treated conservatively. The mean follow-up period was 21.3 months (range 13–29 months). The mean visual analog scale score for radicular leg pain improved from 7.6 to 1.8 and that for back pain improved from 4.3 to 2. The mean Oswestry Disability Index improved from 58.8 to 9.1%. The preoperative symptoms improved after the second treatment without significant neurological sequelae in all patients.

Conclusions

Although transforaminal PELD is a minimally invasive and safe procedure, the possibility of RPH should be kept in mind. Adequate technical and anatomical considerations are important to avoid this unusual hemorrhagic complication, especially in the patient with underlying medical problems or previous operative scarring. A high index of suspicion and early detection is also important to avoid the progression of the hematoma.

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Sang Hyun Suh, Byung Moon Kim, Sung Il Park, Dong Ik Kim, Yong Sam Shin, Eui Jong Kim, Eun Chul Chung, Jun Seok Koh, Hyun Cheol Shin, Chun Sik Choi and Yu Sam Won

Object

A ruptured dissecting aneurysm of the vertebrobasilar artery (VBA-DA) is a well-known cause of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with a high rate of early rebleeding. Internal trapping of the parent artery, including the dissected segment, is one of the most reliable techniques to prevent rebleeding. However, for a ruptured VBA-DA not suitable for internal trapping, the optimal treatment method has not been well established. The authors describe their experience in treating ruptured VBA-DAs not amenable to internal trapping of the parent artery with stent-assisted coil embolization (SAC) followed by a stent-within-a-stent (SWS) technique.

Methods

Eleven patients—6 men and 5 women with a mean age of 48 years and each with a ruptured VBA-DA not amenable to internal trapping of the parent artery—underwent an SAC-SWS between November 2005 and October 2007. The feasibility and clinical and angiographic outcomes of this combined procedure were retrospectively evaluated.

Results

The SAC-SWS was successful without any treatment-related complications in all 11 patients. Immediate posttreatment angiograms revealed complete obliteration of the DA sac in 3 patients, near-complete obliteration in 7, and partial obliteration in 1. One patient died as a direct consequence of the initial SAH. All 10 surviving patients had excellent clinical outcomes (Glasgow Outcome Scale Score 5) without posttreatment rebleeding during a follow-up period of 8–24 months (mean follow-up 15 months). Angiographic follow-up at 6–12 months after treatment was possible at least once in all surviving patients. Nine VBA-DAs showed complete obliteration; the other aneurysm, which had appeared partially obliterated immediately after treatment, demonstrated progressive obliteration on 2 consecutive follow-up angiography studies. There was no in-stent stenosis or occlusion of the branch or perforating vessels.

Conclusions

The SAC-SWS technique seems to be a feasible and effective reconstructive treatment option for a ruptured VBA-DA. The technique may be considered as an alternative therapeutic option in selected patients with ruptured VBA-DAs unsuitable for internal trapping of the parent artery.

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Hong Joo Moon, Bong-Kyung Shin, Joo Han Kim, Jong-Hyun Kim, Taek-Hyun Kwon, Hung-Seob Chung and Youn-Kwan Park

Intramedullary teratomas, particularly adult cervicothoracic lesions, are extremely rare. Up to now only 6 cases of intramedullary cervical teratomas have been reported in adults, and all of these were histologically mature. The authors present the case of a 35-year-old man with progressive myelopathic symptoms who was admitted through an outpatient clinic and was surgically treated. The characteristics, diagnosis, epidemiology, and treatment of cervical intramedullary teratomas in adults are also reviewed. Postoperative MR imaging showed that the tumor had been near totally removed, and severely adherent tissue remained ventrocranially with tiny focal enhancement on follow-up MR imaging. Pathological examinations revealed immature teratoma without any malignant component. Adjuvant therapy was not performed. Although no change in neurological findings and symptoms was apparent postoperatively, lesion regrowth was demonstrated on MR imaging 4 months after surgery. At 8 months postoperatively, myelopathic symptoms had developed and a huge intramedullary tumor recurred according to MR imaging. This case is the seventh reported instance of intramedullary cervical teratoma in an adult, and the first case report of the immature type with malignant features.