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Taewook Kang, Si Young Park, Gun Woo Park, Soon Hyuck Lee, Jong Hoon Park, and Seung Woo Suh

OBJECTIVE

Although endoscopic procedures for lumbar disc herniation have improved greatly and offer many advantages, the indications are limited mostly to nonmigrated or low-grade migrated disc herniation. Endoscopic application in migrated disc herniation cases is still challenging and technically demanding. The goal in this study was to determine the feasibility of biportal endoscopic discectomy for removal of high-grade migrated disc herniation.

METHODS

A retrospective review was performed in 262 patients who had undergone biportal endoscopic discectomy after the diagnosis of lumbar herniated disc. According to preoperative MRI findings, disc herniation was classified into 5 zones based on the direction and distance from the disc space. Patients were divided into 2 groups—a high-grade migration group and a low-grade migration group. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analog scale (VAS), and modified Macnab criteria, and those outcomes and operation time were compared between the 2 groups.

RESULTS

There were 10 patients with “high-grade up,” 8 with “low-grade up,” 98 with disc-level, 102 with “low-grade down,” and 44 with “high-grade down” herniation, thereby yielding 54 patients in the high-grade group and 208 in the low-grade group. Demographic data for the 2 groups showed no significant difference. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in ODI, VAS, and modified Macnab criteria. Operation time between the 2 groups was not significantly different (60.74 vs 65.63 minutes, p > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Biportal endoscopic discectomy can be effective for high-grade migrated lumbar disc herniation with no prolonged operation time and satisfactory clinical outcomes.

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Taewook Kang, Si Young Park, Soon Hyuck Lee, Jong Hoon Park, and Seung Woo Suh

OBJECTIVE

Biportal endoscopic spinal surgery has been performed for several years, and its effectiveness is well known; however, no studies on its safety, specifically intracranial pressure, have been conducted to date. The authors sought to evaluate the effect of biportal endoscopic lumbar discectomy on intracranial pressure by monitoring cervical epidural pressure (CEP) changes throughout the procedure.

METHODS

Twenty patients undergoing single-level biportal endoscopic lumbar discectomy were enrolled in this study. CEPs were monitored throughout the procedure, consisting of phase 1, establishing the surgical portal and working space; phase 2, performing decompression and discectomy; and phase 3, turning off the fluid irrigation system. After discectomy was completed, the authors evaluated changes in CEP as the irrigation pressure increased serially by adding phase 4, increasing irrigation pressure with outflow open; and phase 5, increasing irrigation pressure with outflow closed.

RESULTS

The mean baseline CEP was measured as 16.65 mm Hg. In phase 1, the mean CEP was 17.3 mm Hg, which was not significantly different from the baseline CEP. In phase 2, the mean CEP abruptly increased up to 35.1 mm Hg when the epidural space was first connected with the working space, followed by stabilization of the CEP at 31.65 mm Hg. In phase 4, the CEP increased as the inflow pressure increased, showing a linear correlation, but not in phase 5. No patients experienced neurological complications.

CONCLUSIONS

It is important to ensure that irrigation fluid is not stagnant and is maintained continuously. More attention must be paid to keeping pressures low when opening the epidural space.

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Tae Hoon Roh, Seok-Gu Kang, Ju Hyung Moon, Kyoung Su Sung, Hun Ho Park, Se Hoon Kim, Eui Hyun Kim, Chang-Ki Hong, Chang-Ok Suh, and Jong Hee Chang

OBJECTIVE

Following resection of glioblastoma (GBM), microscopic remnants of the GBM tumor remaining in nearby tissue cause tumor recurrence more often than for other types of tumors, even after gross-total resection (GTR). Although surgical oncologists traditionally resect some of the surrounding normal tissue, whether further removal of nearby tissue may improve survival in GBM patients is unknown. In this single-center retrospective study, the authors assessed whether lobectomy confers a survival benefit over GTR without lobectomy when treating GBMs in the noneloquent area.

METHODS

The authors selected 40 patients who had undergone GTR of a histopathologically diagnosed isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)–wild type GBM in the right frontal or temporal lobe and divided the patients into 2 groups according to whether GTR of the tumor involved lobectomy, defined as a supratotal resection (SupTR group, n = 20) or did not (GTR group, n = 20). Progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) scores were compared between groups (p ≤ 0.05 for statistically significant differences).

RESULTS

The median postoperative PFS times for each group were as follows: GTR group, 11.5 months (95% CI 8.8–14.2) and SupTR group, 30.7 months (95% CI 4.3–57.1; p = 0.007). The median postoperative OS times for each group were as follows: GTR group, 18.7 months (95% CI 14.3–23.1) and SupTR group, 44.1 months (95% CI 25.1–63.1; p = 0.040). The mean postoperative KPS scores (GTR, 76.5; SupTR, 77.5; p = 0.904) were not significantly different. In multivariate analysis, survival for the SupTR group was significantly longer than that for the GTR group in terms of both PFS (HR 0.230; 95% CI 0.090–0.583; p = 0.002) and OS (HR 0.247; 95% CI 0.086–0.704; p = 0.009).

CONCLUSIONS

In cases of completely resectable, noneloquent-area GBMs, SupTR provides superior PFS and OS without negatively impacting patient performance.

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Byung Chan Lim, Jong Hee Chae, Seung-Ki Kim, Sung-Hye Park, Kyu-Chang Wang, Ji Yeoun Lee, and Ji Hoon Phi

Brainstem glioma is a highly devastating disease, and any mass-like lesion in the brainstem can raise suspicion of this diagnosis. However, other inflammatory, demyelinating, or degenerative diseases can mimic brainstem glioma in clinical presentation and imaging features. Therefore, diagnosis based solely on imaging is often insufficient for brainstem lesions and may lead to incorrect diagnosis and treatment.

This case report is the first description of central nervous system aquaporin-4 (AQP4) autoimmunity confined mainly to the brainstem. It demonstrates the wide spectrum of neuroinflammatory diseases in children and highlights the utility of surgical biopsy for suspicious brainstem lesions with atypical imaging features for glioma.

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Ji Hoon Phi, Byung-Kyu Cho, Kyu-Chang Wang, Ji Yeoun Lee, Yong Seung Hwang, Ki Joong Kim, Jong-Hee Chae, In-One Kim, Sung-Hye Park, and Seung-Ki Kim

Object

The long-term surgical outcome of pediatric patients with epilepsy accompanied by focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is not clear. The authors report on the long-term surgical outcomes of children with FCD, based on longitudinal analyses.

Methods

The authors retrospectively analyzed the records of 41 children who underwent epilepsy surgery for pathologically proven FCD. Twenty of these patients were male and 21 were female. The median age at surgery was 9 years (range 1–17 years).

Results

The actuarial seizure-free rates were 49, 44, and 33% in the 1st, 2nd, and 5th years after surgery, respectively. There was no seizure recurrence after 3 years. Three patients with initial failure of seizure control experienced late remission of seizures (the so-called running-down phenomenon). Eventually, 19 patients (46%) were seizure free at their last follow-up visit. Absence of a lesion on MR imaging and incomplete resection were significantly associated with seizure-control failure. Concordance of presurgical evaluation data was a marginally significant variable for seizure control in patients with lesional epilepsy. Three patients with seizure-control failure became seizure free as a result of the running-down phenomenon. The actuarial rate of antiepileptic drug discontinuation was 91% in the 5th year in the seizure-free patients.

Conclusions

The seizure-free rate after surgery in children with FCD was 49% in the 1st year; however, it declined thereafter. The running-down phenomenon could be an important mechanism of seizure alleviation for patients with FCD during long-term follow-up. Because a complete resection of FCD has a strong prognostic implication for seizure control, a better method to define the extent of FCD is required to assist with resection, especially in nonlesional epilepsy.