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John A. Persing

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John A. Persing

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John A. Persing

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John A. Persing, John A. Jane and Johnny B. Delashaw

✓ Bilateral coronal synostosis often results in a turribrachycephalic skull shape. Reduction of skull height and elongation of the anteroposterior axis of the skull while preserving normal cerebral function are the major therapeutic goals. A surgical technique is described which can successfully accomplish these goals in a single operative procedure.

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John A. Jane Jr., Mark D. Krieger and John Persing

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John A. Persing, John A. Jane, Paul A. Levine and Robert W. Cantrell

✓ A technique to expose the anterior cranial base is described with entry through the anterior and posterior walls of the frontal sinus. Burr holes are avoided in the visible portion of the forehead. Expansion of the operative field may be accomplished, if necessary, by supplemental superior frontal or supraorbital rim osteotomy. The technique is rapid, safe, and provides excellent operative exposure and superior cosmetic results.

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Johnny B. Delashaw, John A. Persing, William C. Broaddus and John A. Jane

✓ Skull growth after single suture closure was described in 1851 by Virchow, who noted that growth in the plane perpendicular to a fused suture was restricted. However, this observation failed to predict compensatory growth patterns that produce many of the deformities recognized as features of individual syndromes. The deformities resulting from premature closure of a coronal, sagittal, metopic, or lambdoid suture can be predicted on the basis of the following observations: 1) cranial vault bones that are prematurely fused secondary to single suture closure act as a single bone plate with decreased growth potential; 2) asymmetrical bone deposition occurs mainly at perimeter sutures, with increased bone deposition directed away from the bone plate; 3) sutures adjacent to the prematurely fused suture compensate in growth more than those sutures not contiguous with the closed suture; and 4) enhanced symmetrical bone deposition occurs along both sides of a non-perimeter suture that is a continuation of the prematurely closed suture. These observations regarding growth in craniosynostosis are illustrated with clinical material in this report.

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T. S. Park, William C. Broaddus, Mark Harris, John A. Persing and John A. Jane

✓ In surgical correction of multiple-suture synostosis, placing the patient in the modified prone position permits access to the calvarium from the supraorbital ridge to the occipital bone below the transverse sinus. The modified prone position thereby enables surgeons to perform cranial remodeling procedures at one stage under direct vision, contributing to improved surgical results. However, no satisfactory head-frame for this position has been available.

The authors report the successful use of a vinyl bag filled with styrofoam beads to achieve the modified prone position in young children. This widely available, economical device provides a safe, reliable means of positioning the child's head for cranial remodeling procedures.

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Dennis G. Vollmer, John A. Jane, T. S. Park and John A. Persing

✓ Sagittal synostosis is discussed with respect to the variations seen with the deformity. The morphological spectrum ranging from marked frontal bossing to prominent occipital bulging is described. Surgical techniques have been specifically designed for these variants. These techniques provide an immediate correction of scaphocephaly, and achieve a reduction of the specific deformity with morbidity comparable to that associated with conventional operations. The lack of large areas of craniectomy and the avoidance of synthetic materials are cited as additional advantages of these techniques. The importance of altering the surgical approach to the specific clinical problem is underscored. Two illustrative cases of sagittal synostosis variants are described, and recent experience with the modified operative techniques in treating these and similar cases is discussed.

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William J. Babler, John A. Persing, H. Richard Winn, John A. Jane and George T. Rodeheaver

✓ Premature closure of a cranial suture results in skull deformation characterized by inhibited skull growth in a direction perpendicular to the course of the affected suture. Early surgical release of the closed suture results in a “normal” skull morphology. The present experimental study measured alterations in growth at the transverse cranial sutures that occurred following induced premature closure of the coronal suture and its subsequent release in New Zealand White rabbits. Using roentgenocephalometric methods, growth and morphometric changes were monitored at the frontonasal, coronal, and anterior lambdoid sutures following premature closure of the coronal suture at 9 days of age. The results indicated that premature closure of the coronal suture did not result in compensatory (increased) growth at the other transverse sutures of the vault. In fact, growth at these sutures was significantly reduced. This reduced growth at adjacent transverse sutures was not ameliorated by early surgical release of the fused suture.