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Yun-Tao Lu, Song-Tao Qi, Jia-Ming Xu, Jun Pan and Jin Shi

OBJECT

This study aimed to identify the membranous septation between the adeno- and neurohypophysis. The clinical impact of this septation in the surgical removal of infradiaphragmatic craniopharyngioma (Id-CP) is also clarified.

METHODS

The sellar regions from 8 fetal and 6 adult cadavers were dissected. After staining first with H & E and then with picro-Sirius red, the membranous structures were observed and measured under normal light and polarization microscopy. The pre- and postsurgical images and intraoperative procedures in 28 cases of childhood Id-CP were reviewed and analyzed.

RESULTS

There is a significant membranous septation (termed the adenoneurohypophysis septation [ANHS]) lying behind the intermediate lobe to separate the adeno- and neurohypophysis. The average thicknesses are 21.9 ± 16.9 μm and 79.1 ± 43.2 μm in fetal and adult heads, respectively. The median segment of the septation is significantly thicker than the upper and lower segments. The ANHS extends from the suprasellar pars tuberalis to the sellar floor, where it is fused with the pituitary capsule. During Id-CP surgery performed via a transcranial approach, the ANHS can be identified to reserve the neurohypophysis. Moreover, by understanding the anatomy of this membrane, the pituitary stalk was preserved in 3 patients (10.7%).

CONCLUSIONS

There is a significant membrane separating the anterior and posterior lobes of the pituitary gland, which lies behind the intermediate lobe. Understanding the anatomy of this septation is important for identifying and preserving the neurohypophysis and pituitary stalk during Id-CP surgery.

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Shi-hao Zheng, Jin-lan Huang, Ming Chen, Bing-long Wang, Qi-shui Ou and Sheng-yue Huang

OBJECTIVE

Glioma is the most common form of brain tumor and has high lethality. The authors of this study aimed to elucidate the efficiency of preoperative inflammatory markers, including neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), derived NLR (dNLR), platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR), lymphocyte/monocyte ratio (LMR), and prognostic nutritional index (PNI), and their paired combinations as tools for the preoperative diagnosis of glioma, with particular interest in its most aggressive form, glioblastoma (GBM).

METHODS

The medical records of patients newly diagnosed with glioma, acoustic neuroma, meningioma, or nonlesional epilepsy at 3 hospitals between January 2011 and February 2016 were collected and retrospectively analyzed. The values of NLR, dNLR, PLR, LMR, and PNI were compared among patients suffering from glioma, acoustic neuroma, meningioma, and nonlesional epilepsy and healthy controls by using nonparametric tests. Correlations between NLR, dNLR, PLR, LMR, PNI, and tumor grade were analyzed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic significance of NLR, dNLR, PLR, LMR, PNI, and their paired combinations for glioma, particularly GBM.

RESULTS

A total of 750 patients with glioma (Grade I, 81 patients; Grade II, 208 patients; Grade III, 169 patients; Grade IV [GBM], 292 patients), 44 with acoustic neuroma, 271 with meningioma, 102 with nonlesional epilepsy, and 682 healthy controls were included in this study. Compared with healthy controls and patients with acoustic neuroma, meningioma, or nonlesional epilepsy, the patients with glioma had higher values of preoperative NLR and dNLR as well as lower values of LMR and PNI, whereas PLR was higher in glioma patients than in healthy controls and patients with nonlesional epilepsy. Subgroup analysis revealed a positive correlation between NLR, dNLR, PLR, and tumor grade but a negative correlation between LMR, PNI, and tumor grade in glioma. For glioma diagnosis, the area under the curve (AUC) obtained from the ROC curve was 0.722 (0.697–0.747) for NLR, 0.696 (0.670–0.722) for dNLR, 0.576 (0.549–0.604) for PLR, 0.760 (0.738–0.783) for LMR, and 0.672 (0.646–0.698) for PNI. The best diagnostic performance was obtained with the combination of NLR+LMR and dNLR+LMR, with AUCs of 0.777 and 0.778, respectively. Additionally, NLR (AUC 0.860, 95% CI 0.832–0.887), dNLR (0.840, 0.810–0.869), PLR (0.678, 0.641–0.715), LMR (0.837, 0.811–0.863), and PNI (0.740, 0.706–0.773) had significant predictive value for GBM compared with healthy controls and other disease groups. As compared with the Grade I–III glioma patients, the GBM patients had an AUC of 0.811 (95% CI 0.778–0.844) for NLR, 0.797 (0.763–0.832) for dNLR, 0.662 (0.622–0.702) for PLR, 0.743 (0.707–0.779) for LMR, and 0.661(0.622–0.701) for PNI. For the paired combinations, NLR+LMR demonstrated the highest accuracy.

CONCLUSIONS

The NLR+LMR combination was revealed as a noninvasive biomarker with relatively high sensitivity and specificity for glioma diagnosis, the differential diagnosis of glioma from acoustic neuroma and meningioma, GBM diagnosis, and the differential diagnosis of GBM from low-grade glioma.

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Zhe Bao Wu, Chun Jiang Yu, Zhi Peng Su, Qi Chuan Zhuge, Jin Sen Wu and Wei Ming Zheng

Object

The aim of this study was to observe long-term clinical outcomes in a group of patients treated with bromocriptine for invasive giant prolactinomas involving the cavernous sinus.

Methods

Data from 20 patients with invasive giant prolactinomas at the authors’ institutions between July 1997 and June 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. The criteria to qualify for study participation included: 1) tumor diameter greater than 4 cm, invading the cavernous sinus to an extent corresponding to Grade III or IV in the classification scheme of Knosp and colleagues; 2) serum prolactin (PRL) level greater than 200 ng/ml; and 3) clinical signs of hyperprolactinemia and mass effect. Among the 20 patients who met the criteria, six had undergone unsuccessful transcranial or transsphenoidal microsurgery prior to bromocriptine treatment and 14 patients received bromocriptine as the primary treatment. Eleven of the 20 patients underwent adjuvant radiotherapy.

After a mean follow-up period of 37.3 months, the clinical symptoms in all patients improved by different degrees. Tumor volume on magnetic resonance images was decreased by a mean of 93.3%. In 11 patients, the tumor had almost completely disappeared; in the other nine patients, residual tumor invaded the cavernous sinus. Visual symptoms improved in 13 of the patients who had presented with visual loss. Eight patients had normal PRL levels. The postoperative PRL level was more than 200 ng/ml in seven patients. During the course of drug administration, cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in one patient, who subsequently underwent transsphenoidal surgery. No case of apoplexy occurred during bromocriptine treatment.

Conclusions

Dopamine agonist medications are effective as a first-line therapy for invasive giant prolactinomas, because they can significantly shrink tumor volume and control the PRL level. Tumor mass vanishes in some patients after bromocriptine treatment; in other patients with localized residual tumor, stereotactic radiosurgery is a viable option so that unnecessary surgery can be avoided. The application of radiotherapy does not reliably shrink tumor volume.

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Jian-Hua Zhong, Hua-Jun Zhou, Tao Tang, Han-Jin Cui, A-Li Yang, Qi-Mei Zhang, Jing-Hua Zhou, Qiang Zhang, Xun Gong, Zhao-Hui Zhang and Zhi-Gang Mei

OBJECTIVE

Reactive astrogliosis, a key feature that is characterized by glial proliferation, has been observed in rat brains after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, the mechanisms that control reactive astrogliosis formation remain unknown. Notch-1 signaling plays a critical role in modulating reactive astrogliosis. The purpose of this paper was to establish whether Notch-1 signaling is involved in reactive astrogliosis after ICH.

METHODS

ICH was induced in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats via stereotactic injection of autologous blood into the right globus pallidus. N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) was injected into the lateral ventricle to block Notch-1 signaling. The rats’ brains were perfused to identify proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive/GFAP-positive nuclei. The expression of GFAP, Notch-1, and the activated form of Notch-1 (Notch intracellular domain [NICD]) and its ligand Jagged-1 was assessed using immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses, respectively.

RESULTS

Notch-1 signaling was upregulated and activated after ICH as confirmed by an increase in the expression of Notch-1 and NICD and its ligand Jagged-1. Remarkably, blockade of Notch-1 signaling with the specific inhibitor DAPT suppressed astrocytic proliferation and GFAP levels caused by ICH. In addition, DAPT improved neurological outcome after ICH.

CONCLUSIONS

Notch-1 signaling is a critical regulator of ICH-induced reactive astrogliosis, and its blockage may be a potential therapeutic strategy for hemorrhagic injury.

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Hua-Jun Zhou, Tao Tang, Han-Jin Cui, A-Li Yang, Jie-Kun Luo, Yuan Lin, Qi-Dong Yang and Xing-Qun Li

Object

Angiogenesis occurs after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Thrombin mediates mitogenesis and survival in endothelial cells and induces angiogenesis. The present study aimed to clarify whether thrombin is involved in triggering ICH-related angiogenesis.

Methods

In the first part of the experiment, autologous blood (with or without hirudin) was injected to induce ICH. In the second part, rats received either 1 U (50 μl) thrombin or 50 μl 0.9% sterile saline. In both parts, 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered intraperitoneally. Brains were perfused to identify BrdU-positive/von Willebrand factor (vWF)–positive nuclei. The expression of hypoxia-inducible factor–1α (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) and Ang-2 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

Results

After ICH, the number of BrdU-/vWF-positive nuclei increased until Day 14, and vessels positive for HIF-1α, VEGF, Ang-1, and Ang-2 were observed around the clot. Quantitative analysis showed that ICH upregulated expression of HIF-1α, VEGF, Ang-1, and Ang-2 notably compared with that in sham controls (p < 0.05). However, hirudin significantly inhibited these effects. After thrombin treatment, many BrdU-positive/vWF-positive nuclei and HIF-1α–, VEGF-, Ang-1– and Ang-2–positive vessels could be detected around the affected region.

Conclusions

Thrombin can induce angiogenesis in rat brains and may be an important trigger for ICH-related angiogenesis.