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  • Author or Editor: Jian Xi x
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Xu Bang-Zong, Pan Hong-Xue, Li Ke-Ming, Chen Xi-Jin, Tian Ying-Dei, Li Yong-Lin and Liu Jian

✓ A biomembrane was developed from pig peritoneum treated with 0.65% glutaraldehyde. This was evaluated for use as a dural substitute in an animal model and in a patient population. After being treated with the glutaraldehyde solution, the biomembrane lost its antigenicity while its collagen underwent an irreversible cross-linking reaction, causing it to become a stable nonviable polymer resistant to absorption by the host. The biomembrane was used experimentally in 43 procedures on 20 dogs and was applied clinically in 614 patients. The results demonstrated that it is an acceptable material for the repair of dural defects, with the following advantages: 1) it is nontoxic to the body and brain tissues, with minimal tissue reaction; 2) its biophysical properties facilitate watertight closure with sutures; 3) its distensibility makes it suitable for decompressive surgical dural repair; and 4) its visceral surface is extremely smooth, causing virtually no adhesions with the brain tissue while the outer surface readily heals with the subcutaneous tissue.

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Shang-Hang Shen, Aij-Lie Kwan, Bo-Liang Wang, Jian-Feng Guo, Guo-Wei Tan, Si-Fang Chen, Xi-Yao Liu, Feng Liu, Ming Cai and Zhan-Xiang Wang

Object

The occurrence of hydrocephalic macrocephaly is uncommon. When the condition does occur, it is usually seen in infants and young children. Patients with this disorder have an excessively enlarged head and weak physical conditions. Various surgical techniques of reduction cranioplasty for the treatment of these patients have been reported. In this study, a revised surgical procedure with the aid of simulated computer imaging for the treatment of hydrocephalic macrocephaly is presented.

Methods

Five cases of hydrocephalic macrocephaly in children ranging in age from 16 to 97 months were reviewed. These patients underwent surgical treatment at The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University over a period of 4 years from January 2007 to January 2011. After physical examination, a 3D computer imaging system to simulate the patient's postoperative head appearance and bone reconstruction was established. Afterward, for each case an appropriate surgical plan was designed to select the best remodeling method and cranial shape. Then, prior to performing reduction remodeling surgery in the patient according to the computer-simulated procedures, the surgeon practiced the bone reconstruction technique on a plaster head model made in proportion to the patient's head. In addition, a sagittal bandeau was used to achieve stability and bilateral symmetry of the remodeled cranial vault. Each patient underwent follow-up for 6–32 months.

Results

Medium-pressure ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery or shunt revision procedures were performed in each patient for treating hydrocephalus, and all patients underwent total cranial vault remodeling to reduce the cranial cavity space. Three of the 5 patients underwent a single-stage surgery, while the other 2 patients underwent total cranial vault remodeling in the first stage and the ventriculoperitoneal shunt operation 2 weeks later because of unrecovered hydrocephalus. All patients had good outcome with regard to hydrocephalus and macrocephaly.

Conclusions

There are still no standard surgical strategies for the treatment of hydrocephalic macrocephaly. Based on their experience, the authors suggest using a computer imaging system to simulate a patient's postoperative head appearance and bone reconstruction together with total cranial vault remodeling with shunt surgery in a single-stage or 2-stage procedure for the successful treatment of hydrocephalic macrocephaly.

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Xiao-Dong Wu, Wen Yuan, Hua-Jiang Chen, Yu Chen, Jian-Xi Wang, Peng Cao, Ying Zhang, Xin-Wei Wang, Li-Li Yang, Yuan-Yuan Chen and Nicholas Tsai

Object

Multilevel anterior cervical decompression and fusion is indicated for patients with multilevel compression or stenosis of the spinal cord. Some have reported that this procedure would lead to a loss of cervical range of motion (CROM). However, few studies have demonstrated the exact impact of the procedure on CROM. Here, the authors describe short- and midterm postoperative CROM following multilevel anterior cervical decompression and fusion.

Methods

Thirty-five patients underwent a 3- or 4-level anterior cervical decompression and fusion. In all patients, active CROM was measured preoperatively and at both the short-term (3–4 months) and midterm (12–15 months) follow-ups by using a CROM device. The preoperative and postoperative data were analyzed using ANOVA (α = 0.05).

Results

Patients had significantly less ROM in all planes of motion postoperatively. The greater limitation in CROM was observed at the short-term follow-up. However, at the midterm follow-up, an obvious increase in CROM was observed in each cardinal plane compared with that in the short-term (sagittal plane 17.4%, coronal plane 14.1%, and horizontal plane 19.5%). A gradual increase in the CROM in each cardinal plane was observed during the recovery period in 5 patients. In the 6 conventional motions, the major recovery of CROM was observed in flexion (27.5%), while relatively less recovery was seen in extension (10.5%).

Conclusions

Patients had an obvious reduction in active CROM following multilevel anterior cervical decompression and fusion. The greater limitation in CROM was observed at the short-term follow-up. In the midterm follow-up, however, an obvious recovery in CROM was observed in each cardinal plane, reducing the restriction of neck motion further.