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Jian Shen, Jian-Wei Pan, Zuo-Xu Fan, Xiao-Xing Xiong and Ren-Ya Zhan

Object

Clazosentan therapy after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has been found to be effective in reducing the incidence of vasospasm in randomized controlled trials. However, while vasospasm-related morbidity, including delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DINDs) and delayed cerebral infarctions, was consistently decreased, statistical significance was not demonstrated and outcomes were not affected by clazosentan treatment. The objective of this meta-analysis was to determine whether clazosentan treatment after aneurysmal SAH significantly reduced the incidence of DINDs and delayed cerebral infarctions and improved outcomes.

Methods

All randomized controlled trials investigating the effect of clazosentan were retrieved via searches with sensitive and specific terms. Six variables were abstracted after the assessment of the methodological quality of the trials. Analyses were performed following the method guidelines of the Cochrane Back Review Group.

Results

Four randomized, placebo-controlled trials met eligibility criteria, enrolling a total of 2181 patients. The meta-analysis demonstrated a significant decrease in the incidence of DINDs (relative risk [RR] 0.76 [95% CI 0.62–0.92]) and delayed cerebral infarction (RR 0.79 [95% CI 0.63–1.00]) in patients treated with clazosentan after aneurysmal SAH. However, this treatment regimen was not shown to outcomes including functional outcomes measured by Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (RR 1.12 [95% CI 0.96–1.30]) or mortality (RR 1.02 [95%CI 0.70–1.49]). Adverse events, including pulmonary complications, anemia, and hypotension, were all significantly increased in patients who received clazosentan therapy.

Conclusions

The results of the present meta-analysis show that treatment with clazosentan after aneurysmal SAH significantly reduced the incidence of the vasospasm-related DINDs and delayed cerebral infarctions, but did not improve poor neurological outcomes in patients with aneurysmal SAH. Further study is required to elucidate the dissociation between vasospasm-related morbidity and outcomes.

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Yong-Jian Zhu, Guang-Yu Ying, Ai-Qin Chen, Lin-Lin Wang, Dan-Feng Yu, Liang-Liang Zhu, Yu-Cheng Ren, Chen Wang, Peng-Cheng Wu, Ying Yao, Fang Shen and Jian-Min Zhang

OBJECT

Posterior midline laminectomy or hemilaminectomy has been successfully applied as the standard microsurgical technique for the treatment of spinal intradural pathologies. However, the associated risks of postoperative spinal instability increase the need for subsequent fusion surgery to prevent potential long-term spinal deformity. Continuous efforts have been made to minimize injuries to the surrounding tissue resulting from surgical manipulations. The authors report here their experiences with a novel minimally invasive surgical approach, namely the interlaminar approach, for the treatment of lumbar intraspinal tumors.

METHODS

A retrospective review was conducted of patients at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine who underwent minimally invasive resection of lumbar intradural-extramedullary tumors. By using an operative microscope, in addition to an endoscope when necessary, the authors were able to treat all patients with a unilateral, paramedian, bone-sparing interlaminar technique. Data including preoperative neurological status, tumor location, size, pathological diagnosis, extension of resections, intraoperative blood loss, length of hospital stay, and clinical outcomes were obtained through clinical and radiological examinations.

RESULTS

Eighteen patients diagnosed with lumbar intradural-extramedullary tumors were treated from October 2013 to March 2015 by this interlaminar technique. A microscope was used in 15 cases, and the remaining 3 cases were treated using a microscope as well as an endoscope. There were 14 schwannomas, 2 ependymomas, 1 epidermoid cyst, and 1 enterogenous cyst. Postoperative radiological follow-up revealed complete removal of all the lesions and no signs of bone defects in the lamina. At clinical follow-up, 14 of the 18 patients had less pain, and patients' motor/sensory functions improved or remained normal in all cases except 1.

CONClUSIONS

When meeting certain selection criteria, intradural-extramedullary lumbar tumors, especially schwannomas, can be completely and safely resected through a less-invasive interlaminar approach using a microscope, or a microscope in addition to an endoscope when necessary. This approach was advantageous because it caused even less bone destruction, resulting in better postoperative spinal stability, no need for facetectomy and fusion, and quicker functional recovery for the patients. Individualized surgical planning according to preoperative radiological findings is key to a successful microsurgical resection of these lesions through the interlaminar space.

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Sun Liyong, Yuhai Bao, Jiantao Liang, Mingchu Li and Jian Ren

The posterior interhemispheric approach is a versatile approach to access lesions of the pineal region, posterior incisural space, posterior region of third ventricle, and adjacent structures. We demonstrate the case of a 26-year-old woman with symptoms of increased intracranial pressure and hydrocephalus caused by a meningioma at the posteromedial tentorial incisura. Gross-total removal of the tumor was successfully achieved via a posterior interhemispheric transtentorial approach. The patient reported an immediate and significant symptomatic improvement after surgery. The detailed operative technique and surgical nuances, including the surgical corridor, tentorium incision, tumor dissection and removal are illustrated in this video atlas.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/nSNyjQKl7aE.

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Chen Wang, Chien-Min Chen, Fang Shen, Xiao-Dong Fang, Guang-Yu Ying, Yu-Cheng Ren, Dan-Feng Yu, Liang-Liang Zhu, Yong-Jian Zhu and Jian-Min Zhang

Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (SDAVFs) are the most common type of spinal arteriovenous malformations, and microsurgical ligation is the treatment modality most frequently used for these lesions. Developments in endoscopic techniques have made endoscopy an even less invasive alternative to routine microsurgical approaches in spine surgery, but endoscopic management of SDAVF or other intradural spinal lesions has not been reported to date.

The authors describe the use of a microscope-assisted endoscopic interlaminar approach for the ligation of the proximal draining vein of an L-1 SDAVF in a 58-year-old man. A complete cure was confirmed by postoperative angiography. The postoperative course was uneventful, and short-term follow-up showed improvements in the patient's neurological function. The authors conclude that the endoscopic interlaminar approach with microscope assistance is a safe, minimally invasive, innovative technique for the surgical management of SDAVFs in selected patients.

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Liyong Sun, Hongqi Zhang and Jian Ren

The authors demonstrate the case of a 16-year-old girl with a large symptomatic occipital arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The staged embolization was performed to downgrade the AVM from Spetzler-Martin (S-M) Grade IV (Supplementary S-M Grade 7) to Grade III (Supplementary S-M Grade 5). The patient developed a subacute progressive visual field defect after the final time of embolization. MRI revealed an enlarged draining venous ectasia of the AVM compressing the visual cortex. Postoperatively, good radiological results were achieved, and the patient reported an improvement in her symptoms. The detailed operative technique and surgical nuances (including the surgical features of the AVM postembolization) of the marginal dissection and removal are illustrated in this video atlas.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/2MZq5patcJI.

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Jian Shen, Kai-Yuan Huang, Yu Zhu, Jian-Wei Pan, Hao Jiang, Yu-Xiang Weng and Ren-Ya Zhan

OBJECTIVE

The efficacy of statin therapy in treating aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains controversial. In this meta-analysis, the authors investigated whether statin treatment significantly reduced the incidence of cerebral vasospasm and delayed neurological deficits, promoting a better outcome after aneurysmal SAH.

METHODS

A literature search of the PubMed, Ovid, and Cochrane Library databases was performed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective cohort studies investigating the effect of statin treatment. The end points of cerebral vasospasm, delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND), delayed cerebral infarction, mortality, and favorable outcome were statistically analyzed.

RESULTS

Six RCTs and 2 prospective cohort studies met the eligibility criteria, and a total of 1461 patients were included. The meta-analysis demonstrated a significant decrease in the incidence of cerebral vasospasm (relative risk [RR] 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61–0.96) in patients treated with statins after aneurysmal SAH. However, no significant benefit was observed for DIND (RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.70–1.12), delayed cerebral infarction (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.33–1.31), mortality (RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.39–1.24) or favorable outcome, according to assessment by the modified Rankin Scale or Glasgow Outcome Scale (RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.92–1.17).

CONCLUSIONS

Treatment with statins significantly decreased the occurrence of vasospasm after aneurysmal SAH. The incidence of DIND, delayed cerebral infarction, and mortality were not affected by statin treatment. Future research should focus on DIND and how statins influence DIND.

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Feng-Tao Liu, Li-Qin Lang, Ren-Yuan Zhou, Rui Feng, Jie Hu, Jian Wang and Jian-Jun Wu

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a well-established therapy for patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), dystonia, and other movement disorders. In contrast to the strong positive effects that have been documented for motor symptoms, the effects of DBS on nonmotor symptoms have not been fully elucidated. Some reports suggest that stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus may improve lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with PD; however, reports of the effects of globus pallidus internus (GPi) DBS on urinary symptoms are limited. The authors present the case of a 49-year-old woman with PD who developed severe urinary incontinence after 27 months of GPi DBS. The urinary incontinence disappeared when stimulation was turned off, and reemerged after it was turned on again. After activation of a more dorsal contact in the left electrode, the patient’s urinary dynamics returned to normal.

Free access

Liyong Sun, Jian Ren and Hongqi Zhang

Craniocervical junction dural arteriovenous fistula (CCJDAVF) is a rare and unique type of intracranial DAVF with complex neurovascular anatomy, making it difficult to identify the arterialized vein during operation. The authors report the case of a 50-year-old male who presented with symptoms of venous hypertensive myelopathy. Angiography demonstrated a left CCJDAVF. The fistula was successfully disconnected via a suboccipital midline approach. The selective indocyanine green videoangiography (SICG-VA) technique was applied to distinguish the fistula site and arterialized vein from adjacent normal vessels. Favorable clinical and angiographic outcomes were attained. The detailed operative technique, surgical nuances, and utility of SICG-VA are illustrated in this video atlas.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/GJYl_jOJQqU.

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Jian Ren, Tao Hong, Chuan He, Xiaoyu Li, Yongjie Ma, Jiaxing Yu, Feng Ling and Hongqi Zhang

OBJECTIVE

Optimal surgical strategies for intramedullary spinal cord cavernous malformations (ISCCMs) are not optimized and remain problematic. In this study the authors identify rational surgical strategies for ISCCMs and predictors of outcomes after resection.

METHODS

A single-center study was performed with 219 consecutive surgically treated patients who presented from 2002 to 2017 and were analyzed retrospectively. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale was used to evaluate neurological functions. Patient characteristics, surgical approaches, and immediate and long-term postoperative outcomes were identified.

RESULTS

The average ISCCM size was 10.5 mm. The spinal level affected was cervical in 24.8% of patients, thoracic in 73.4%, and lumbar in 1.8%. The locations of the lesions in the horizontal plane were 30.4% ventral, 41.6% dorsal, and 28.0% central. Of the 214 patients included in the cohort for operative evaluation, 62.6% had superficially located lesions, while 37.4% were embedded. Gross-total resection was achieved in 98.1% of patients. The immediate postoperative neurological condition worsened in 10.3% of the patients. Multivariate logistic regression identified mild preoperative function (p = 0.014, odds ratio [OR] 4.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4–14.8) and thoracolumbar-level lesions (p = 0.01, OR 15.7, 95% CI 1.9–130.2) as independent predictors of worsening. The mean follow-up duration in 187 patients was 45.9 months. Of these patients, 63.1% were stable, 33.2% improved, and 3.7% worsened. Favorable outcomes were observed in 86.1% of patients during long-term follow-up and were significantly associated with preoperative mild neurological and disability status (p = 0.000) and cervically located lesions (p = 0.009). The depths of the lesions were associated with worse long-term outcomes (p = 0.001), and performing myelotomy directly through a yellowish abnormal surface in moderate-depth lesions was an independent predictor of worsening (p = 0.023, OR 35.3, 95% CI 1.6–756.3).

CONCLUSIONS

Resection performed with an individualized surgical approach remains the primary therapeutic option in ISCCMs. Performing surgery in patients with mild symptoms at the thoracolumbar level and embedded located lesions requires more discretion.