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Yong-Chan Kim, Ji Hao Cui, Ki-Tack Kim, Gyu-Taek Park, Keun-Ho Lee, Sung-Min Kim and Lawrence G. Lenke

OBJECTIVE

In this study, the authors’ goal was to develop and validate novel radiographic parameters that better describe total body sagittal alignment (TBSA).

METHODS

One hundred sixty-six consecutive operative spinal deformity patients were evaluated using full-body stereoradiographic imaging. Seven TBSA parameters were measured and then correlated to 6 commonly used spinopelvic measurements. TBSA measures consisted of 4 distance measures relating the cranial center of mass (CCOM) to the sacrum, hips, knees, and ankles, and 3 angular measures relating the CCOM to the hips, knees, and ankles. Furthermore, each TBSA parameter was correlated to patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Scoliosis Research Society–22 (SRS-22) instruments. Thirty patients were randomly selected for inter- and intraobserver reliability testing of the TBSA parameters using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs).

RESULTS

All TBSA radiographic parameters demonstrated strong linear correlation with the currently accepted primary measure of sagittal balance, the C7 sagittal vertical axis (r = 0.55–0.96, p < 0.001). Moreover, 5 of 7 TBSA measures correlated strongly with ODI and SRS-22 total scores (r = 0.42–0.51, p < 0.001). Inter- and intraobserver reliability for all TBSA measures was good to excellent (interrater ICC = 0.70–0.98, intrarater ICC = 0.77–1.0).

CONCLUSIONS

In spine deformity patients, novel TBSA radiographic parameters correlated well with PROs and with currently utilized spinal sagittal measurements. Inter- and intrarater reliability was high for these novel parameters. This is the first study to propose a reliable method for measuring head-to-toe global spinal alignment.

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Gwanhee Ehm, Han-Joon Kim, Ji-Young Kim, Jee-Young Lee, Hee Jin Kim, Ji Young Yun, Young Eun Kim, Hui-Jun Yang, Yong Hoon Lim, Beomseok Jeon and Sun Ha Paek

OBJECTIVE

For patients with highly asymmetrical Parkinson’s disease (PD), unilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been suggested as a reasonable treatment. However, the results of a previous 2-year follow-up study involving patients with prominently asymmetrical PD who had unilateral STN DBS suggested that simultaneous bilateral surgery should be performed. In the present study, the authors analyze 7-year follow-up data from the same patient group to examine changes in motor benefit from unilateral STN DBS over time and the interval between initial unilateral surgery and a second (contralateral) STN DBS surgery.

METHODS

Eight patients with highly asymmetrical parkinsonism who underwent unilateral STN DBS were evaluated. The factors measured were scores on the motor part of the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS III), Hoehn and Yahr (HY) stage, and levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD). Evaluations occurred at 3, 6, and 12 months after the initial surgery and annually thereafter.

RESULTS

The mean follow-up period was 91.5 months (range 36–105 months). Three years after the initial unilateral surgery, motor benefits on the contralateral side continued; however, an aggravation of the ipsilateral parkinsonism attenuated the improvement in total UPDRS III scores, which reverted to baseline. Axial motor score, LEDD, and HY stage did not differ from the baseline. Seven of 8 patients (87.5%) were considered candidates for a second surgery to offer additional motor benefits. Of the 7 candidates, 4 patients (50% of total patients) underwent the second surgery at 58.5 ± 11.6 (mean ± SD) months after the initial surgery. Three patients were not able to have the second surgery: one patient died of gastric cancer, one patient was severely immobilized by an accident, and one patient could not afford the second surgery. One patient remained content with the initial unilateral surgery throughout the follow-up period.

CONCLUSIONS

Seven of 8 patients with unilateral STN DBS became candidates for second surgery before battery replacement surgery of the first implanted device. Baseline asymmetry alone may not predict appropriate candidates for unilateral STN DBS. This study provides further evidence that, from a long-term perspective, initial simultaneous bilateral STN DBS should be considered for PD patients with prominently asymmetrical motor symptoms.

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Dong-Hun Kang, Byung Moon Kim, Ji Hoe Heo, Hyo Suk Nam, Young Dae Kim, Yang-Ha Hwang, Yong-Won Kim, Yong-Sun Kim, Dong Joon Kim, Hyo Sung Kwak, Hong Gee Roh, Young-Jun Lee and Sang Heum Kim

OBJECTIVE

The role of the balloon guide catheter (BGC) has not been evaluated in contact aspiration thrombectomy (CAT) for acute stroke. Here, the authors aimed to test whether the BGC was associated with recanalization success and good functional outcome in CAT.

METHODS

All patients who had undergone CAT as the first-line treatment for anterior circulation intracranial large vessel occlusion were retrospectively identified from prospectively maintained registries for six stroke centers. The patients were dichotomized into BGC utilization and nonutilization groups. Clinical findings, procedural details, and recanalization success rates were compared between the two groups. Whether the BGC was associated with recanalization success and functional outcome was assessed.

RESULTS

A total of 429 patients (mean age 68.4 ± 11.4 years; M/F ratio 215:214) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A BGC was used in 45.2% of patients. The overall recanalization and good outcome rates were 80.2% and 52.0%, respectively. Compared to the non-BGC group, the BGC group had a significantly reduced number of CAT passes (2.6 ± 1.6 vs 3.4 ± 1.5), shorter puncture-to-recanalization time (56 ± 27 vs 64 ± 35 minutes), lower need for the additional use of thrombolytics (1.0% vs 8.1%), and less embolization to a distal or different site (0.5% vs 3.4%). The BGC group showed significantly higher final (89.2% vs 72.8%) and first-pass (24.2% vs 8.1%) recanalization success rates. After adjustment for potentially associated factors, BGC utilization remained independently associated with recanalization (OR 4.171, 95% CI 1.523–11.420) and good functional outcome (OR 2.103, 95% CI 1.225–3.612).

CONCLUSIONS

BGC utilization significantly increased the final and first-pass recanalization rates and remained independently associated with recanalization success and good functional outcome.

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Ji Yong Kim, Chang Hyun Oh, Xian Huang, Moon Hang Kim, Seung Hwan Yoon, Kil Hwan Kim, Hyeonseon Park, Hyung Chun Park, So Ra Park and Byung Hyune Choi

Object

The aim in this study was to determine whether granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) leads to sensory improvement in rat spinal cord injury (SCI) models.

Methods

Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were included in this study: 10 in the sham group (laminectomy alone without SCI), 10 in the SCI group (SCI treated with phosphate-buffered saline), and 10 in the GM-CSF treatment group (SCI treated with GM-CSF). A locomotor function test and pain sensitivity test were conducted weekly for 9 weeks after SCI or sham injury. Spinal tissue samples from all rats were immunohistochemically examined for the expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and abnormal sprouting at Week 9 post-SCI.

Results

Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor treatment improves functional recovery after SCI. In the tactile withdrawal threshold and frequency of the hindlimb paw, the GM-CSF group always responded with a statistically significant lower threshold than the SCI group 9 weeks after SCI (p < 0.05). The response of the forelimb and hindlimb paws to cold in the GM-CSF group always reflected a statistically significant lower threshold than in the SCI group 9 weeks after injury (p < 0.05). Decreased CGRP expression, observed by density and distribution area, was noted in the GM-CSF group (optical density 113.5 ± 20.4) compared with the SCI group (optical density 143.1 ± 18.7; p < 0.05).

Conclusions

Treatment with GM-CSF results in functional recovery, improving tactile and cold sense recovery in a rat SCI model. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor also minimizes abnormal sprouting of sensory nerves after SCI.

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Ji Woong Oh, Kyoung Su Sung, Ju Hyung Moon, Eui Hyun Kim, Won Seok Chang, Hyun Ho Jung, Jin Woo Chang, Yong Gou Park, Sun Ho Kim and Jong Hee Chang

OBJECTIVE

This study investigated long-term follow-up data on the combined pituitary function test (CPFT) in patients who had undergone transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) for nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA) to determine the clinical parameters indicative of hypopituitarism following postoperative Gamma Knife surgery (GKS).

METHODS

Between 2001 and 2015, a total of 971 NFPA patients underwent TSS, and 76 of them (7.8%) underwent postoperative GKS. All 76 patients were evaluated with a CPFT before and after GKS. The hormonal states were analyzed based on the following parameters: relevant factors before GKS (age, sex, extent of resection, pre-GKS hormonal states, time interval between TSS and GKS), GKS-related factors (tumor volume; radiation dose to tumor, pituitary stalk, and normal gland; distance between tumor and stalk), and clinical outcomes (tumor control rate, changes in hormonal states, need for hormone-related medication due to hormonal changes).

RESULTS

Of the 971 NFPA patients, 797 had gross-total resection (GTR) and 174 had subtotal resection (STR). Twenty-five GTR patients (3.1%) and 51 STR patients (29.3%) underwent GKS. The average follow-up period after GKS was 53.5 ± 35.5 months, and the tumor control rate was 96%. Of the 76 patients who underwent GKS, 23 were excluded due to pre-GKS panhypopituitarism (22) or loss to follow-up (1). Hypopituitarism developed in 13 (24.5%) of the remaining 53 patients after GKS. A higher incidence of post-GKS hypopituitarism occurred in the patients with normal pre-GKS hormonal states (41.7%, 10/24) than in the patients with abnormal pre-GKS hormonal states (10.3%, 3/29; p = 0.024). Target tumor volume (4.7 ± 3.9 cm3), distance between tumor and pituitary stalk (2.0 ± 2.2 mm), stalk dose (cutoffs: mean dose 7.56 Gy, maximal dose 12.3 Gy), and normal gland dose (cutoffs: maximal dose 13.9 Gy, minimal dose 5.25 Gy) were factors predictive of post-GKS hypopituitarism (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

This study analyzed the long-term follow-up CPFT data on hormonal changes in NFPA patients who underwent GKS after TSS. The authors propose a cutoff value for the radiation dose to the pituitary stalk and normal gland for the prevention of post-GKS hypopituitarism.

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Jung Hee Kim, Yun-Sik Dho, Yong Hwy Kim, Jung Hyun Lee, Ji Hyun Lee, A. Ram Hong and Chan Soo Shin

OBJECTIVE

The natural history and proper algorithm for follow-up testing of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (PAs) are not well known, despite their relatively high prevalence. The aim of this study was to suggest the optimal follow-up algorithm for nonfunctioning PAs based on their natural history.

METHODS

The authors followed up 197 patients with nonfunctioning PAs that had not been treated (including surgery and radiation therapy) at the time of detection, in a single center, between March 2000 and February 2017. They conducted a hormone test, visual field test, and MRI at the time of diagnosis and yearly thereafter.

RESULTS

The overall median follow-up duration was 37 months. Microadenomas (n = 38) did not cause visual disturbance, pituitary apoplexy, or endocrine dysfunction. The incidence of patients with tumor volume growth ≥ 20% was higher for macroadenomas than microadenomas (13.8 vs 5.0 per 100 person-years [PYs], p = 0.002). The median time to any tumor growth was 4.8 years (95% CI 3.4–4.8 years) for microadenomas and 4 years (95% CI 3.3–4.2 years) for macroadenomas. The overall incidence of worsening visual function was 0.69 per 100 PYs. Patients with a tumor volume growth rate ≥ 0.88 cm3/year (n = 20) had a higher incidence of worsening visual function (4.69 vs 0.30 per 100 PYs, p < 0.001). The tumor growth rate of all microadenomas was < 0.88 cm3/year. The median time to tumor growth ≥ 20% was 3.3 years (95% CI 1.8–3.9 years) in patients with a tumor growth rate ≥ 0.88 cm3/year and 4.9 years (95% CI 4.6–7.2 years) in patients with a tumor growth rate < 0.88 cm3/year.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors have devised a follow-up strategy based on the tumor volume growth rate as well as initial tumor volume. In patients with microadenomas, the next MRI study can be performed at 3 years. In patients with macroadenomas, the second MRI study should be performed between 6 months and 1 year to assess the tumor growth rate. In patients with a tumor growth rate ≥ 0.88 cm3/year, the MRI study should be performed within 2 years. In patients with a tumor growth rate < 0.88 cm3/year, the MRI study can be delayed until 4 years.

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Ji Hoon Phi, Byung-Kyu Cho, Kyu-Chang Wang, Ji Yeoun Lee, Yong Seung Hwang, Ki Joong Kim, Jong-Hee Chae, In-One Kim, Sung-Hye Park and Seung-Ki Kim

Object

The long-term surgical outcome of pediatric patients with epilepsy accompanied by focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is not clear. The authors report on the long-term surgical outcomes of children with FCD, based on longitudinal analyses.

Methods

The authors retrospectively analyzed the records of 41 children who underwent epilepsy surgery for pathologically proven FCD. Twenty of these patients were male and 21 were female. The median age at surgery was 9 years (range 1–17 years).

Results

The actuarial seizure-free rates were 49, 44, and 33% in the 1st, 2nd, and 5th years after surgery, respectively. There was no seizure recurrence after 3 years. Three patients with initial failure of seizure control experienced late remission of seizures (the so-called running-down phenomenon). Eventually, 19 patients (46%) were seizure free at their last follow-up visit. Absence of a lesion on MR imaging and incomplete resection were significantly associated with seizure-control failure. Concordance of presurgical evaluation data was a marginally significant variable for seizure control in patients with lesional epilepsy. Three patients with seizure-control failure became seizure free as a result of the running-down phenomenon. The actuarial rate of antiepileptic drug discontinuation was 91% in the 5th year in the seizure-free patients.

Conclusions

The seizure-free rate after surgery in children with FCD was 49% in the 1st year; however, it declined thereafter. The running-down phenomenon could be an important mechanism of seizure alleviation for patients with FCD during long-term follow-up. Because a complete resection of FCD has a strong prognostic implication for seizure control, a better method to define the extent of FCD is required to assist with resection, especially in nonlesional epilepsy.

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Ji Hee Kim, Hyun Ho Jung, Jong Hee Chang, Jin Woo Chang, Yong Gou Park and Won Seok Chang

Object

Intracranial chordomas and chondrosarcomas are histologically low-grade, locally invasive tumors that are reported to be similar in terms of anatomical location, clinical presentation, and radiological findings but different in terms of behavior and outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare clinical outcomes after Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for the treatment of intracranial chordoma and chondrosarcoma.

Methods

The authors conducted a retrospective review of the results of radiosurgical treatment of intracranial chordomas and chondrosarcomas. They enrolled patients who had undergone GKS for intracranial chordoma or chondrosarcoma at the Yonsei Gamma Knife Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, from October 2000 through June 2007. Analyses included only patients for whom the disease was pathologically diagnosed before GKS and for whom more than 5 years of follow-up data after GKS were available. Rates of progression-free survival and overall survival were analyzed and compared according to tumor pathology. Moreover, the association between tumor control and the margin radiation dose to the tumor was analyzed, and the rate of tumor volume change after GKS was quantified.

Results

A total of 10 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, 5 patients underwent a total of 8 sessions of GKS for chordoma, and the other 5 patients underwent a total of 7 sessions of GKS for chondrosarcoma. The 2- and 5-year progression-free survival rates for patients in the chordoma group were 70% and 35%, respectively, and rates for patients in the chondrosarcoma group were 100% and 80%, respectively (log-rank test, p = 0.04). The 2- and 5-year overall survival rates after GKS for patients in the chordoma group were 87.5% and 72.9%, respectively, and rates for patients in the chondrosarcoma group were 100% and 100%, respectively (log-rank test, p = 0.03). The mean rates of tumor volume change 2 years after radiosurgery were 79.64% and 39.91% for chordoma and chondrosarcoma, respectively (p = 0.05). No tumor progression was observed when margin doses greater than 16 Gy for chordoma and 14 Gy for chondrosarcoma were prescribed.

Conclusions

Outcomes after GKS were more favorable for patients with chondrosarcoma than for those with chordoma. The data also indicated that at 2 years after GKS, the rate of volume change is significantly higher for chordomas than for chondrosarcomas. The authors conclude that radiosurgery with a margin dose of more than 16 Gy for chordomas and more than 14 Gy for chondrosarcomas seems to enhance local tumor control with relatively few complications. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal dose of GKS for patients with intracranial chordoma or chondrosarcoma.