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Kyung Hyun Kim, Ji Yeoun Lee, Ji Hoon Phi, Seung-Ki Kim, Byung-Kyu Cho and Kyu-Chang Wang

OBJECTIVE

The surgical indications for some arachnoid cysts (ACs) are controversial. While surgical procedures can be effective when an AC is a definite cause of hydrocephalus or papilledema, most ACs do not cause any symptoms or signs. Some surgeons perform several procedures to treat ACs because of their large size. The purpose of this study was to compare the long-term outcomes of Galassi type III ACs between surgery and nonsurgery groups.

METHODS

The medical records of 60 patients diagnosed with sylvian ACs (Galassi type III) who visited Seoul National University Children’s Hospital from July 1990 to March 2018 were analyzed. The authors compared the outcomes between those treated with surgery and those not treated with surgery.

RESULTS

Of the 60 patients, 27 patients had no symptoms, 19 patients had vague symptoms and signs associated with ACs, and the remaining 14 patients had definite AC-related symptoms and signs. Thirty-eight patients underwent surgery, and 22 patients underwent observation. Some operations were accompanied by complications. Among the 33 patients in the surgery group, excluding 5 with hydrocephalus or papilledema, 8 patients needed 18 additional operations. However, there were no patients in the nonsurgery group who needed surgical intervention during the follow-up period (mean 67.5 months), although the size of the AC increased in 2 patients. Changes in AC size were not correlated with symptom relief.

CONCLUSIONS

When patients with hydrocephalus or papilledema were excluded, there was no difference in the outcomes between the surgery and nonsurgery groups regardless of the size of the sylvian AC. Surgeons should be cautious when deciding whether to operate.

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Hyunho Choi, Ji Yeoun Lee, Ji Hoon Phi, Seung-Ki Kim, Byung-Kyu Cho and Kyu-Chang Wang

Object

Postoperative epidural hematoma (EDH), a blood collection between the inserted galeal flap and the overlying skull flap (epigaleal flap hematoma), is a frustrating complication of the surgical treatment of moyamoya disease (MMD) in pediatric patients. The symptoms of postoperative EDH are often similar to those of postoperative cerebral ischemia, and may cause confusion during clinical decision making. The authors designed this study to evaluate the incidence, clinical presentation, risk factors, and treatment outcomes of postoperative EDH in pediatric patients with MMD.

Methods

A retrospective review of 148 pediatric patients with 250 craniotomies who underwent indirect bypass revascularization surgery between January 2002 and December 2006 was performed. This group consisted of 60 male and 88 female patients, and the mean age at surgery was 7.5 years (range 1–18 years).

Results

Of the 250 craniotomies, postoperative EDH was detected in 32 cases. In 12 cases of EDH, surgical treatment was necessary (4.8% of 250 craniotomies). During the same period, 743 non-MMD craniotomy operations were performed. In 6 of these 743 operations, patients developed postoperative EDH that required surgical treatment, significantly less than the percentage of EDH requiring postoperative treatment in patients with MMD (0.8%, p < 0.001). The average interval between craniotomy surgery and the detection of EDH was 1.8 days (range 0–5 days) in patients with MMD and 0.5 days (range 0–2 days; p = 0.018) in the non-MMD craniotomy group.

Postoperative EDH was observed in significantly fewer cases (17 of 191) when a subcutaneous drain (SCD) was inserted over the bone flap than in cases in which an SCD was not inserted (14 of 55; p = 0.001). The mean international normalized ratio of prothrombin time in the immediate postoperative blood test was 1.27 ± 0.17 in the EDH group and 1.20 ± 0.11 in the non-EDH group (values are expressed as the mean ± SD; p = 0.008). Central galeal flap tenting suture and immediate postoperative platelet count were not related to the incidence of postoperative EDH following pediatric MMD surgery.

Conclusions

Postoperative EDH is more likely to be found following craniotomy in patients with MMD than in those without MMD, and may occur in a delayed fashion. Insertion of an SCD and immediate correction of an abnormal value for international normalized ratio of prothrombin time can decrease the incidence of postoperative EDH following surgery for pediatric MMD.

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Eun Ji Kim, Kyu-Chang Wang, Ji Yeoun Lee, Ji Hoon Phi, Sung-Hye Park, Jung-Eun Cheon, Young Eun Jang and Seung-Ki Kim

Infantile myofibromatosis, a rare mesenchymal disorder that develops in early childhood, is classified by the number of lesions that occur: solitary or multicentric. Involvement of the CNS is unusual in either type. Infantile myofibromatosis in the spine is exceptional, and most published cases represent a secondary invasion. Here, the authors report on an 8-month-old girl presenting with weakness below the ankle and an intraspinal mass extending from T-6 to the conus. The patient underwent only partial surgical removal of the lesion, and the pathology was confirmed as infantile myofibromatosis. After the operation, weakness in the lower extremities gradually improved; however, she could not walk at the time of the final follow-up. On follow-up MRI performed 19 months after the operation, the residual lesion remained unchanged with decreased enhancement.

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Ji Yeoun Lee, Young Ah Lee, Hae Woon Jung, Sangjoon Chong, Ji Hoon Phi, Seung-Ki Kim, Choong-Ho Shin and Kyu-Chang Wang

OBJECTIVE

Due to their distinct location, suprasellar arachnoid cysts are known to cause a wide variety of problems, such as hydrocephalus, endocrine symptoms, and visual abnormalities. The long-term outcome of these cysts has not been elucidated. To find out the long-term outcome of suprasellar arachnoid cysts, a retrospective review of the patients was performed. The neurological and endocrine symptoms were thoroughly reviewed.

METHODS

Forty-five patients with suprasellar arachnoid cysts, with an average follow-up duration of 9.7 years, were enrolled in the study. A comprehensive review was performed of the results of follow-up regarding not only neurological symptoms but also endocrine status. The outcomes of 8 patients who did not undergo operations and were asymptomatic or had symptoms unrelated to the cyst were included in the series.

RESULTS

Surgery was most effective for the symptoms related to hydrocephalus (improvement in 32 of 32), but endocrine symptoms persisted after surgery (4 of 4) and required further medical management. More surprisingly, a fairly large number of patients (14 of 40; 1 was excluded because no pre- or postoperative endocrine evaluation was available) who had not shown endocrine symptoms at the time of the initial diagnosis and treatment later developed endocrine abnormalities such as precocious puberty and growth hormone deficiency. The patients with endocrine symptoms detected during the follow-up included those in both the operated (n = 12 of 32) and nonoperated (n = 2 of 8) groups who had been stable during follow-up since the initial diagnosis.

CONCLUSIONS

This study implies that patients with suprasellar arachnoid cysts can develop late endocrine problems during follow-up, even if other symptoms related to the cyst have been successfully treated. Hence, patients with these cysts need long-term follow-up for not only neurological symptoms but also endocrine abnormalities.

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Joongyub Lee, Seung-Ki Kim, Hee Gyung Kang, Il-Soo Ha, Kyu-Chang Wang, Ji Yeoun Lee and Ji Hoon Phi

OBJECTIVE

Although an association between moyamoya disease (MMD) and renovascular hypertension has been acknowledged, the literature on systemic hypertension without renal artery stenosis among patients with MMD is scarce. The authors aimed to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors of hypertension using data from MMD patients who visited an outpatient clinic of a pediatric neurosurgical department in 2016.

METHODS

The authors evaluated the blood pressure (BP) of pediatric MMD patients at their postsurgical appointment following the American Academy of Pediatrics clinical practice guideline on high BP, in which hypertension was defined as BP measurements higher than the value of age-, sex-, and height-specific 95th percentile of the general population from at least 3 separate visits. Growth of patients was determined using 2017 Korean National Growth Charts for children and adolescents. The cutoff value of the 95th percentile of BP was determined by referring to normative BP tables of Korean children and adolescents. A logistic regression model was used to assess the associations between patients’ clinical characteristics and prevalent hypertension.

RESULTS

In total, 131 surgically treated pediatric MMD patients were included, of whom 38.9% were male and the median age at diagnosis was 8.0 years (range 1.2–15.0 years). The definition of hypertension was met in 38 patients, with a prevalence of 29.0% (95% CI 21.2%–36.8%). A tendency was observed for a higher prevalence of hypertension in male patients (31.4%), in patients with posterior cerebral artery (PCA) involvement (47.8%), and in cases in which infarction was shown on initial MRI (37.3%). Age at diagnosis (adjusted OR [aOR] 0.82, 95% CI 0.70–0.97), PCA involvement (aOR 3.81, 95% CI 1.29–11.23), body mass index (aOR 1.30, 95% CI 1.13–1.51), and years of follow-up since surgery (aOR 0.80, 95% CI 0.68–0.94) were related to systemic hypertension.

CONCLUSIONS

A high prevalence of hypertension was demonstrated in pediatric MMD patients. Therefore, adequate attention should be paid to reduce BP and prevent subsequent events.

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Hyeoncheol Hwang, Kyu-Chang Wang, Moon Suk Bang, Hyung-Ik Shin, Seung-Ki Kim, Ji Hoon Phi, Ji Yeoun Lee, Jinwoo Choi, Seungwoo Cha and Keewon Kim

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to establish optimal electric stimulation parameters for intraoperatively monitoring the bulbocavernosus reflexes (BCRs) in infants.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all infants (age < 24 months) who had undergone an untethering operation for tethered cord syndrome between May 2013 and February 2014 at a single institution and whose baseline BCR had been elicited during surgery. Using different combinations of stimulation parameters—number of stimulation pulses: 4 or 8 pulses, interpulse interval: 1, 2, or 5 msec, and polarity of stimulation: biphasic or monophasic—the authors compared the relative mean amplitude of 10 BCR responses (rmaBCRs) to each combination of parameters.

RESULTS

The rmaBCRs were larger with the 8-pulse stimulations than with the 4-pulse stimulations (p < 0.0001). There was a tendency, though not statistically significant, for larger rmaBCRs to be obtained with the longer interpulse interval in the 8-pulse stimulation (p = 0.1289). The biphasic stimulation produced larger rmaBCRs than the monophasic stimulation (p = 0.0005).

CONCLUSIONS

Biphasic 8-pulse stimulations with 5-msec or 2-msec intervals yield the largest BCR responses. Considering that an 8-pulse stimulation with 5-msec intervals may overlap the onset of the BCR, a biphasic 8-pulse stimulation with 2-msec intervals is recommended as the optimal stimulation paradigm to monitor intraoperative BCRs in infants.

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Jung Won Choi, Seung-Ki Kim, Kyu-Chang Wang, Ji Yeoun Lee, Jung-Eun Cheon and Ji Hoon Phi

Object

Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt surgery is the most common treatment for hydrocephalus. In certain situations, uncommon complications can occur after shunting procedures. The authors undertook this study to analyze the clinical characteristics of pediatric patients who developed multifocal intraparenchymal hemorrhages (MIPHs) as a complication of shunt surgery. The authors also analyzed the risk factors for MIPH in a large cohort of patients with hydrocephalus.

Methods

This study included all pediatric patients (age < 18 years) who underwent VP shunt surgery at the authors' institution between January 2001 and December 2012. During this period, 507 VP shunt operations were performed in 330 patients. Four of these patients were subsequently diagnosed as having MIPH. The authors analyzed the clinical characteristics of these patients in comparison with those of the entire group of shunt-treated patients.

Results

The incidence of MIPH was 1.2% (4 of 330 cases) for all pediatric patients who underwent VP shunt placement but 2.9% (4 of 140 cases) for infants less than 1 year old. When the analysis was limited to patients whose corrected age was less than 3 months, the incidence was 5.3% (4 of 76 cases). Of the 4 patients with MIPH, 2 were male and 2 were female. Their median age at surgery was 54 days (range 25–127 days), and in all 4 cases, the patients' corrected age was less than 1 month. Three patients were preterm infants, whereas one patient was full-term. None of these patients had a prior history of intracranial surgery (including CSF diversion procedures). All showed severe hydrocephalus during the preoperative period. Their clinical courses as patients with MIPH were comparatively favorable, despite the radiological findings.

Conclusions

MIPH is a rare but not negligible complication of VP shunt surgery. This complication might be a unique phenomenon in infants, especially young, preterm infants with severe hydrocephalus. Moreover, the absence of previous intracranial procedures might be one of the risk factors for this complication. The rapid alteration of brain conditions in the setting of immaturity might cause MIPH. To prevent this complication, the authors recommend that pressure settings of programmable valves should be gradually adapted to the target pressure.

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Hyun-Seung Kang, Youn-Joo Moon, Young-Yim Kim, Woong-Yang Park, Ae Kyung Park, Kyu-Chang Wang, Jeong Eun Kim, Ji Hoon Phi, Ji Yeoun Lee and Seung-Ki Kim

Object

Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a cerebrovascular occlusive disease affecting bilateral internal carotid termini. Smooth-muscle cells are one of the major cell types involved in this disease process. The characteristics of circulating smooth-muscle progenitor cells (SPCs) in MMD are poorly understood. The authors purified SPCs from the peripheral blood of patients with MMD and sought to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in SPCs from these patients.

Methods

The authors cultured and isolated SPCs from the peripheral blood of patients with MMD (n = 25) and healthy control volunteers (n = 22). After confirmation of the cellular phenotype, RNA was extracted from the cells and DEGs were identified using a commercially available gene chip. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to confirm the putative pathogenetic DEGs.

Results

The SPC-type outgrowth cells in patients with MMD invariably showed a hill-and-valley appearance under microscopic examination, and demonstrated high α–smooth muscle actin, myosin heavy chain, and calponin expression (96.5% ± 2.1%, 42.8% ± 18.6%, and 87.1% ± 8.2%, respectively), and minimal CD31 expression (less than 1%) on fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis. The SPCs in the MMD group tended to make more irregularly arranged and thickened tubules on the tube formation assay. In the SPCs from patients with MMD, 286 genes (124 upregulated and 162 downregulated) were differentially expressed; they were related to cell adhesion, cell migration, immune response, and vascular development.

Conclusions

With adequate culture conditions, SPCs could be established from the peripheral blood of patients with MMD. These cells showed specific DEGs compared with healthy control volunteers. This study provides a novel experimental cell model for further research of MMD.

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Seung Ah Choi, Sangjoon Chong, Pil Ae Kwak, Youn Joo Moon, Anshika Jangra, Ji Hoon Phi, Ji Yeoun Lee, Sung-Hye Park and Seung-Ki Kim

OBJECTIVE

Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) isolated from pediatric patients with moyamoya disease (MMD) have demonstrated decreased numbers and defective functioning in in vitro experiments. However, the function of ECFCs has not been evaluated using in vivo animal models. In this study, the authors compared normal and MMD ECFCs using a chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) rat model.

METHODS

A CCH rat model was made via ligation of the bilateral common carotid arteries (2-vessel occlusion [2-VO]). The rats were divided into three experimental groups: vehicle-treated (n = 8), normal ECFC-treated (n = 8), and MMD ECFC-treated (n = 8). ECFCs were injected into the cisterna magna. A laser Doppler flowmeter was used to evaluate cerebral blood flow, and a radial arm maze test was used to examine cognitive function. Neuropathological examinations of the hippocampus and agranular cortex were performed using hematoxylin and eosin and Luxol fast blue staining in addition to immunofluorescence with CD31, von Willebrand factor, NeuN, myelin basic protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and cleaved caspase-3 antibodies.

RESULTS

The normal ECFC-treated group exhibited improvement in the restoration of cerebral perfusion and in behavior compared with the vehicle-treated and MMD ECFC-treated groups at the 12-week follow-up after the 2-VO surgery. The normal ECFC-treated group showed a greater amount of neovasculogenesis and neurogenesis, with less apoptosis, than the other groups.

CONCLUSIONS

These results support the impaired functional recovery of MMD ECFCs compared with normal ECFCs in a CCH rat model. This in vivo study suggests the functional role of ECFCs in the pathogenesis of MMD.

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Ji Yeoun Lee, Sangjoon Chong, Young Hun Choi, Ji Hoon Phi, Jung-Eun Cheon, Seung-Ki Kim, Sung Hye Park, In-One Kim and Kyu-Chang Wang

OBJECTIVE

Since the entity limited dorsal myeloschisis (LDM) was proposed, numerous confusing clinical cases have been renamed according to the embryopathogenesis. However, clinical application of this label appears to require some clarification with regard to pathology. There have been cases in which all criteria for the diagnosis of LDM were met except for the presence of a neural component in the stalk, an entity the authors call “probable” LDM. The present study was performed to meticulously review these cases and suggest that a modified surgical strategy using limited laminectomy is sufficient to achieve the surgical goal of untethering.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings, operative notes, and pathology reports of spinal dysraphism patients with subcutaneous stalk lesions who had presented to their institution between 2010 and 2014.

RESULTS

Among 33 patients with LDM, 13 had the typical nonsaccular lesions with simple subcutaneous stalks connecting the skin opening to the spinal cord. Four cases had “true” LDM meeting all criteria for diagnosis, including pathological confirmation of CNS tissue by immunohistochemical staining with glial fibrillary acidic protein. There were also 9 cases in which all clinical, imaging, and surgical findings were compatible with LDM, but the “neural” component in the resected stalk was not confirmed. For all the cases, limited exposure of the stalk was done and satisfactory untethering was achieved.

CONCLUSIONS

One can speculate based on the initial error of embryogenesis that if the entire stalk were traced to the point of insertion on the cord, the neural component would be proven. However, this would require an extended level of laminectomy/laminotomy, which may be unnecessary, at least with regard to the completeness of untethering. Therefore, the authors propose that for some selected cases of LDM, a minimal extent of laminectomy may suffice for untethering, although it may be insufficient for diagnosing a true LDM.