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Ji Hoon Phi and Chun Kee Chung

Object

Surgical treatment of brain tumors in the mesial temporal lobe (MTL) is a highly demanding procedure. Only a few studies describing the surgery of MTL tumors have been reported, and they have been focused on the operative techniques and immediate results of the surgery. The authors have analyzed the long-term oncological outcome in patients with MTL tumors.

Methods

Thirty-six patients with an MTL tumor were studied. The mean patient age at surgery was 32 years (range 13–62 years). The tumors were confined to the MTL (Schramm Type A) in 25 patients (69%). Extension of the tumor into the fusiform gyrus (Schramm Type C) and temporal stem (Schramm Type D) was observed in 4 and 7 patients (11 and 19%), respectively. There was a significant difference in the tumor size according to Schramm types (p = 0.001). Complete tumor resection was achieved in 26 patients (72%). All tumors were low-grade lesions except for 1 anaplastic astrocytoma.

Results

After a median follow-up period of 50.5 months, 7 patients showed progression of the disease. The actuarial progression-free survival rates were 97% in the 1st year, 84% in the 2nd year, and 80% in the 5th year. The degree of tumor resection was significantly related to the tumor control failure (p < 0.001) and malignant transformation of a low-grade tumor (p < 0.001). Univariate analyses using a Cox proportional hazards model showed that the following factors were significantly associated with a failure to control the tumor: 1) extent of the tumor (Schramm Type D; p = 0.003, relative risk [RR] 12.04); 2) size of the tumor (p = 0.033, RR 1.052/mm); 3) patient age at surgery ≥ 50 years (p = 0.007, RR 8.312); and 4) short duration of epilepsy (< 6 months; p = 0.001, RR 21.54).

Conclusions

Surgery is the principal treatment for MTL tumors, despite its technical difficulty. Complete tumor resection is strongly recommended for long-term tumor control. The MTL tumors are heterogeneous in their prognosis. Older age, short duration of epilepsy, and tumor size are all associated with poor outcome. Patients with these characteristics may have a more aggressive form of the disease than those with MTL tumors associated with chronic epilepsy.

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Frederick A. Boop

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Won-Sang Cho, Seung-Ki Kim, Kyu-Chang Wang, Ji Hoon Phi and Byung-Kyu Cho

Intracystic bleomycin (ICB) administration is known to be effective in the treatment of cystic craniopharyngiomas (CRPs) and rarely causes serious complications. The authors report a case of vasculopathy after ICB injection for a recurrent cystic CRP. A 5-year-old boy presented with the cystic recurrence of a CRP. A catheter and Ommaya system were inserted into the cyst, followed by a leakage test 2 weeks later. Bleomycin was delivered at 3 mg per week for 14 weeks (total dose 42 mg). Four months later, the patient's activity decreased and right hemiparesis occurred. Magnetic resonance imaging and cerebral angiography demonstrated a recurrent multicystic mass and infarction at the left middle cerebral artery territory with stenosis/occlusion of the left distal internal carotid artery and posterior cerebral artery. During the operation to remove the recurrent cystic mass, fibrotic stenoocclusion of the left intracranial arteries was identified. The cyst was totally removed. However, additional multiple border zone infarctions occurred in the left hemisphere, and the patient became wheelchair bound. Leakage of ICB was considered as the most probable cause of the cerebral vasculopathy and corresponding infarction. A leakage test may not always guarantee a leakage-free status even if the test is negative. Direct bypass surgery should have been considered to prevent a high risk of postoperative infarction in this case of a recurrent CRP with confirmed vasculopathy.

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Chang Sub Lee, Ji Hoon Phi, Seung-Ki Kim, Byung-Kyu Cho and Kyu-Chang Wang

Object

Congenital dermal sinus (CDS) usually develops in the midline of the body as a single tract. To date, only a few patients with multiple CDS tracts and ostia have been reported. The authors analyzed the clinical features of patients with spinal CDS and multiple ostia and proposed a novel hypothesis for the pathogenesis of the atypical CDS.

Methods

Five patients with spinal CDS and multiple ostia were included. The clinical, radiological, and operative features of these patients were reviewed retrospectively.

Results

Three patients demonstrated bilateral paramedian ostia at the same or a very similar spinal level. One patient showed a paramedian and a midline ostium. One patient had 2 unilateral paramedian ostia at different spinal levels. The layers of the internal ending of CDS tracts were diverse. Complete removal of the tracts was possible in all patients. Two patients had dermoid tumors. All patients had an associated anomaly, such as a lumbosacral lipoma or the Currarino triad. The authors propose a “zipping error” hypothesis for the formation of dual ostia located at the spinal level of primary neurulation. An associated anomaly such as a lumbosacral lipoma may contribute to the formation of dual ostia.

Conclusions

Unilateral or bilateral dual ostia may be present in patients with CDS, especially when an associated anomaly is present. The atypical CDS may develop from aberrant neural tube closure.

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Haeng Jin Lee, Ji Hoon Phi, Seung-Ki Kim, Kyu-Chang Wang and Seong-Joon Kim

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to report the incidence of and the factors associated with papilledema in children with hydrocephalus.

METHODS

Patients younger than 15 years of age who had been diagnosed with hydrocephalus and treated by extra-ventricular drainage or ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery between 2005 and 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Factors including patient age and sex, etiology of hydrocephalus, duration of signs or symptoms, intracranial pressure (ICP), and presence of papilledema were evaluated.

RESULTS

Forty-six patients, whose mean age was 6.3 ± 4.7 years, were included in the study. The 19 patients without papilledema had a mean age of 2.7 ± 2.7 years, and the 27 patients with papilledema had a mean age of 8.8 ± 4.2 years (p < 0.001). The mean ICP was 19.9 ± 10.0 cm H2O among those without papilledema and 33.3 ± 9.1 cm H2O among those with papilledema (p < 0.001). The mean duration of signs or symptoms was 3.0 ± 4.6 months in the patients without papilledema and 3.4 ± 3.9 months in those with papilledema (p = 0.704). The patients with papilledema were older and presented with higher ICP than those without. The causes of hydrocephalus were tumor (59%), congenital anomaly (19%), hemorrhage (13%), and infection (9%).

CONCLUSIONS

Papilledema was more common in patients who were older, who had higher ICP, and whose hydrocephalus had been induced by brain tumor. However, since papilledema was absent in 41% of the children with hydrocephalus, papilledema's absence does not ensure the absence of hydrocephalus, especially in younger patients.

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Jung Won Choi, Seung-Ki Kim, Kyu-Chang Wang, Ji Yeoun Lee, Jung-Eun Cheon and Ji Hoon Phi

Object

Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt surgery is the most common treatment for hydrocephalus. In certain situations, uncommon complications can occur after shunting procedures. The authors undertook this study to analyze the clinical characteristics of pediatric patients who developed multifocal intraparenchymal hemorrhages (MIPHs) as a complication of shunt surgery. The authors also analyzed the risk factors for MIPH in a large cohort of patients with hydrocephalus.

Methods

This study included all pediatric patients (age < 18 years) who underwent VP shunt surgery at the authors' institution between January 2001 and December 2012. During this period, 507 VP shunt operations were performed in 330 patients. Four of these patients were subsequently diagnosed as having MIPH. The authors analyzed the clinical characteristics of these patients in comparison with those of the entire group of shunt-treated patients.

Results

The incidence of MIPH was 1.2% (4 of 330 cases) for all pediatric patients who underwent VP shunt placement but 2.9% (4 of 140 cases) for infants less than 1 year old. When the analysis was limited to patients whose corrected age was less than 3 months, the incidence was 5.3% (4 of 76 cases). Of the 4 patients with MIPH, 2 were male and 2 were female. Their median age at surgery was 54 days (range 25–127 days), and in all 4 cases, the patients' corrected age was less than 1 month. Three patients were preterm infants, whereas one patient was full-term. None of these patients had a prior history of intracranial surgery (including CSF diversion procedures). All showed severe hydrocephalus during the preoperative period. Their clinical courses as patients with MIPH were comparatively favorable, despite the radiological findings.

Conclusions

MIPH is a rare but not negligible complication of VP shunt surgery. This complication might be a unique phenomenon in infants, especially young, preterm infants with severe hydrocephalus. Moreover, the absence of previous intracranial procedures might be one of the risk factors for this complication. The rapid alteration of brain conditions in the setting of immaturity might cause MIPH. To prevent this complication, the authors recommend that pressure settings of programmable valves should be gradually adapted to the target pressure.

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Hyunho Choi, Ji Yeoun Lee, Ji Hoon Phi, Seung-Ki Kim, Byung-Kyu Cho and Kyu-Chang Wang

Object

Postoperative epidural hematoma (EDH), a blood collection between the inserted galeal flap and the overlying skull flap (epigaleal flap hematoma), is a frustrating complication of the surgical treatment of moyamoya disease (MMD) in pediatric patients. The symptoms of postoperative EDH are often similar to those of postoperative cerebral ischemia, and may cause confusion during clinical decision making. The authors designed this study to evaluate the incidence, clinical presentation, risk factors, and treatment outcomes of postoperative EDH in pediatric patients with MMD.

Methods

A retrospective review of 148 pediatric patients with 250 craniotomies who underwent indirect bypass revascularization surgery between January 2002 and December 2006 was performed. This group consisted of 60 male and 88 female patients, and the mean age at surgery was 7.5 years (range 1–18 years).

Results

Of the 250 craniotomies, postoperative EDH was detected in 32 cases. In 12 cases of EDH, surgical treatment was necessary (4.8% of 250 craniotomies). During the same period, 743 non-MMD craniotomy operations were performed. In 6 of these 743 operations, patients developed postoperative EDH that required surgical treatment, significantly less than the percentage of EDH requiring postoperative treatment in patients with MMD (0.8%, p < 0.001). The average interval between craniotomy surgery and the detection of EDH was 1.8 days (range 0–5 days) in patients with MMD and 0.5 days (range 0–2 days; p = 0.018) in the non-MMD craniotomy group.

Postoperative EDH was observed in significantly fewer cases (17 of 191) when a subcutaneous drain (SCD) was inserted over the bone flap than in cases in which an SCD was not inserted (14 of 55; p = 0.001). The mean international normalized ratio of prothrombin time in the immediate postoperative blood test was 1.27 ± 0.17 in the EDH group and 1.20 ± 0.11 in the non-EDH group (values are expressed as the mean ± SD; p = 0.008). Central galeal flap tenting suture and immediate postoperative platelet count were not related to the incidence of postoperative EDH following pediatric MMD surgery.

Conclusions

Postoperative EDH is more likely to be found following craniotomy in patients with MMD than in those without MMD, and may occur in a delayed fashion. Insertion of an SCD and immediate correction of an abnormal value for international normalized ratio of prothrombin time can decrease the incidence of postoperative EDH following surgery for pediatric MMD.

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Eun Ji Kim, Kyu-Chang Wang, Ji Yeoun Lee, Ji Hoon Phi, Sung-Hye Park, Jung-Eun Cheon, Young Eun Jang and Seung-Ki Kim

Infantile myofibromatosis, a rare mesenchymal disorder that develops in early childhood, is classified by the number of lesions that occur: solitary or multicentric. Involvement of the CNS is unusual in either type. Infantile myofibromatosis in the spine is exceptional, and most published cases represent a secondary invasion. Here, the authors report on an 8-month-old girl presenting with weakness below the ankle and an intraspinal mass extending from T-6 to the conus. The patient underwent only partial surgical removal of the lesion, and the pathology was confirmed as infantile myofibromatosis. After the operation, weakness in the lower extremities gradually improved; however, she could not walk at the time of the final follow-up. On follow-up MRI performed 19 months after the operation, the residual lesion remained unchanged with decreased enhancement.

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Kyung Sun Song, Sung-Hye Park, Byung-Kyu Cho, Kyu-Chang Wang, Ji Hoon Phi and Seung-Ki Kim

Meningiomas are rare in children. Chordoid meningioma is a very rare variant, as only 16 cases in children have been reported. The authors report the first case of a chordoid meningioma in the third ventricle.

A 12-year-old boy presented with headache, abnormal behaviors, and ataxia. Brain MR imaging revealed a 2-cm, well-enhanced mass in the third ventricle and hydrocephalus. Positron emission tomography with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose showed that the mass was hypermetabolic. Gross-total removal of the mass was performed using a left frontal transcortical and transventricular approach. The mass originated from the left caudate head and was connected to the choroid plexus. A chordoid meningioma was diagnosed on the basis of the histological characteristics of the tumor, which was composed of cords and nests of eosinophilic vacuolated cells with an abundant myxoid matrix, similar to the features of a chordoma. A typical focal meningiomatous pattern was observed. The tumor cells were immunoreactive for vimentin and epithelial membrane antigen. The patient's headache and gait disturbance improved after the tumor was removed. The tumor showed no signs of recurrence during 12 months of follow-up.