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Tony Goldschlager, Nicolas Dea, Michael Boyd, Jeremy Reynolds, Shreyaskumar Patel, Laurence D. Rhines, Ehud Mendel, Marina Pacheco, Edwin Ramos, Tobias A. Mattei and Charles G. Fisher

OBJECT

Giant cell tumors (GCTs) of the spine are rare and complex to treat. They have a propensity for local recurrence and the potential to metastasize. Treatment is currently surgical and presents unique challenges due to the proximity of neural structures and the need for reconstruction. Denosumab has been shown in clinical trials to be an effective treatment for GCT, but has not yet been studied specifically in GCT of the spine or as a surgical adjunct. To the authors' knowledge this is the first such reported series.

METHODS

A multicenter, prospective series of 5 patients with GCT of the spine treated with denosumab were included. Patient demographic data, oncological history, neurological status, tumor staging, treatment details and adverse events, surgical procedure, complications, radiological and histological responses, and patient outcome were analyzed.

RESULTS

All patients were women, with a mean age of 38 years, and presented with pain; 2 patients had additional neurological signs and symptoms. The mean duration of symptoms was 62 weeks. No patient had a prior tumor or metastatic disease at presentation. All patients had Enneking Stage III tumors and were treated with monthly cycles of 120 mg of denosumab, with initial additional loading doses on Days 8 and 15. Patients were given daily supplements of calcium (500 mg) and vitamin D (400 IU). There were no denosumab-related adverse events. All patients had a radiological response to denosumab. One patient failed to have a histological response to denosumab, with > 90% of tumor cells found to be viable on histological investigation.

CONCLUSIONS

This study reports the early experience of using denosumab in the treatment of spinal GCT. The results demonstrate a clinically beneficial radiological response and an impressive histological response in most but not all patients. Further experience with denosumab and longer patient follow-up is required. Denosumab has the potential to change the treatment paradigm for spinal GCT.

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Anne L. Versteeg, Nicolas Dea, Stefano Boriani, Peter P. Varga, Alessandro Luzzati, Michael G. Fehlings, Mark H. Bilsky, Laurence D. Rhines, Jeremy J. Reynolds, Mark. B. Dekutoski, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Niccole M. Germscheid and Charles G. Fisher

OBJECTIVE

Osteoblastoma is a rare primary benign bone tumor with a predilection for the spinal column. Although of benign origin, osteoblastomas tend to behave more aggressively clinically than other benign tumors. Because of the low incidence of osteoblastomas, evidence-based treatment guidelines and high-quality research are lacking, which has resulted in inconsistent treatment. The goal of this study was to determine whether application of the Enneking classification in the management of spinal osteoblastomas influences local recurrence and survival time.

METHODS

A multicenter database of patients who underwent surgical intervention for spinal osteoblastoma was developed by the AOSpine Knowledge Forum Tumor. Patient data pertaining to demographics, diagnosis, treatment, cross-sectional survival, and local recurrence were collected. Patients in 2 cohorts, based on the Enneking classification of the tumor (Enneking appropriate [EA] and Enneking inappropriate [EI]), were analyzed. If the final pathology margin matched the Enneking-recommended surgical margin, the tumor was classified as EA; if not, it was classified as EI.

RESULTS

A total of 102 patients diagnosed with a spinal osteoblastoma were identified between November 1991 and June 2012. Twenty-nine patients were omitted from the analysis because of short follow-up time, incomplete survival data, or invalid staging, which left 73 patients for the final analysis. Thirteen (18%) patients suffered a local recurrence, and 6 (8%) patients died during the study period. Local recurrence was strongly associated with mortality (relative risk 9.2; p = 0.008). When adjusted for Enneking appropriateness, this result was not altered significantly. No significant differences were found between the EA and EI groups in regard to local recurrence and mortality.

CONCLUSIONS

In this evaluation of the largest multicenter cohort of spinal osteoblastomas, local recurrence was found to be strongly associated with mortality. Application of the Enneking classification as a treatment guide for preventing local recurrence was not validated.

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Daniel M. Sciubba, Mohamed Macki, Mohamad Bydon, Niccole M. Germscheid, Jean-Paul Wolinsky, Stefano Boriani, Chetan Bettegowda, Dean Chou, Alessandro Luzzati, Jeremy J. Reynolds, Zsolt Szövérfi, Patti Zadnik, Laurence D. Rhines, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Charles G. Fisher and Peter Paul Varga

OBJECT

Clinical outcomes in patients with primary spinal osteochondromas are limited to small series and sporadic case reports. The authors present data on the first long-term investigation of spinal osteochondroma cases.

METHODS

An international, multicenter ambispective study on primary spinal osteochondroma was performed. Patients were included if they were diagnosed with an osteochondroma of the spine and received surgical treatment between October 1996 and June 2012 with at least 1 follow-up. Perioperative prognostic variables, including patient age, tumor size, spinal level, and resection, were analyzed in reference to long-term local recurrence and survival. Tumor resections were compared using Enneking appropriate (EA) or Enneking inappropriate surgical margins.

RESULTS

Osteochondromas were diagnosed in 27 patients at an average age of 37 years. Twenty-two lesions were found in the mobile spine (cervical, thoracic, or lumbar) and 5 in the fixed spine (sacrum). Twenty-three cases (88%) were benign tumors (Enneking tumor Stages 1–3), whereas 3 (12%) exhibited malignant changes (Enneking tumor Stages IA–IIB). Sixteen patients (62%) underwent en bloc treatment—that is, wide or marginal resection—and 10 (38%) underwent intralesional resection. Twenty-four operations (92%) followed EA margins. No one received adjuvant therapy. Two patients (8%) experienced recurrences: one in the fixed spine and one in the mobile spine. Both recurrences occurred in latent Stage 1 tumors following en bloc resection. No osteochondroma-related deaths were observed.

CONCLUSIONS

In the present study, most patients underwent en bloc resection and were treated as EA cases. Both recurrences occurred in the Stage 1 tumor cohort. Therefore, although benign in character, osteochondromas still require careful management and thorough follow-up.

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Dean Chou, Mark H. Bilsky, Alessandro Luzzati, Charles G. Fisher, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Laurence D. Rhines, Mark B. Dekutoski, Michael G. Fehlings, Ravi Ghag, Peter Varga, Stefano Boriani, Niccole M. Germscheid, Jeremy J. Reynolds and the AOSpine Knowledge Forum Tumor

OBJECTIVE

Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are rare soft-tissue sarcomas. Resection is the mainstay of treatment and the most important prognostic factor. However, complete resection of spinal MPNSTs with tumor-free margins is challenging due to the likelihood of residual tumor cells. The objective of this study was to describe whether the type of Enneking resection in the management of spinal MPNSTs had an effect on local recurrence and survival.

METHODS

The AOSpine Knowledge Forum Tumor developed a multicenter database that includes demographic, diagnostic, therapeutic, local recurrence, and survival data on patients with primary spinal column tumors. Patients who had undergone surgery for a primary spinal MPNST were included and were analyzed in 2 groups: 1) those undergoing Enneking appropriate (EA) resections and 2) those undergoing Enneking inappropriate (EI) resections. EA surgery was performed if there was histopathological evidence of an intact tumor pseudocapsule and at least a marginal resection on a vital structure. EI surgery was performed if there was an intentional or inadvertent transgression of the margin.

RESULTS

Between 1993 and 2012, 29 primary spine MPNSTs were identified in 12 (41%) females and 17 (59%) males with a mean age at diagnosis of 40 ± 17 years (range 5–74 years). The median patient follow-up was 1.3 years (range 42 days to 11.2 years). In total, 14 (48%) patients died and 14 (48%) patients suffered a local recurrence, 10 (71%) of whom died. Within 2 years after surgery, the median survival and local recurrence were not achieved. Data about Enneking appropriateness of surgery were available for 27 patients; 9 (33%) underwent an EA procedure and 18 (67%) underwent an EI procedure. Enneking appropriateness did not have a significant influence on local recurrence or survival. Twenty-two patients underwent adjuvant treatment with combined chemo- and radiotherapy (n = 7), chemotherapy alone (n = 3), or radiotherapy alone (n = 12). Adjuvant therapy had no significant influence on recurrence or survival.

CONCLUSIONS

The rates of recurrence and survival were similar for spinal MPNSTs regardless of whether patients had an EA or EI resection or received adjuvant therapy. Other factors such as variability of pathologist interpretation, PET CT correlation, or neurofibromatosis Type 1 status may play a role in patient outcome. Nonetheless, MPNSTs should still be treated as sarcomas until further evidence is known. The authors recommend an individualized approach with careful multidisciplinary decision making, and the patient should be informed about the morbidity of en bloc surgery when considering MPNST resection.

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Ziya L. Gokaslan, Patricia L. Zadnik, Daniel M. Sciubba, Niccole Germscheid, C. Rory Goodwin, Jean-Paul Wolinsky, Chetan Bettegowda, Mari L. Groves, Alessandro Luzzati, Laurence D. Rhines, Charles G. Fisher, Peter Pal Varga, Mark B. Dekutoski, Michelle J. Clarke, Michael G. Fehlings, Nasir A. Quraishi, Dean Chou, Jeremy J. Reynolds, Richard P. Williams, Norio Kawahara and Stefano Boriani

OBJECT

A chordoma is an indolent primary spinal tumor that has devastating effects on the patient's life. These lesions are chemoresistant, resistant to conventional radiotherapy, and moderately sensitive to proton therapy; however, en bloc resection remains the preferred treatment for optimizing patient outcomes. While multiple small and largely retrospective studies have investigated the outcomes following en bloc resection of chordomas in the sacrum, there have been few large-scale studies on patients with chordomas of the mobile spine. The goal of this study was to review the outcomes of surgically treated patients with mobile spine chordomas at multiple international centers with respect to local recurrence and survival. This multiinstitutional retrospective study collected data between 1988 and 2012 about prognosis-predicting factors, including various clinical characteristics and surgical techniques for mobile spine chordoma. Tumors were classified according to the Enneking principles and analyzed in 2 treatment cohorts: Enneking-appropriate (EA) and Enneking-inappropriate (EI) cohorts. Patients were categorized as EA when the final pathological assessment of the margin matched the Enneking recommendation; otherwise, they were categorized as EI.

METHODS

Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data (Student t-test, chi-square, and Fisher exact tests). Recurrence and survival data were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves, log-rank tests, and multivariate Cox proportional hazard modeling.

RESULTS

A total of 166 patients (55 female and 111 male patients) with mobile spine chordoma were included. The median patient follow-up was 2.6 years (range 1 day to 22.5 years). Fifty-eight (41%) patients were EA and 84 (59%) patients were EI. The type of biopsy (p < 0.001), spinal location (p = 0.018), and if the patient received adjuvant therapy (p < 0.001) were significantly different between the 2 cohorts. Overall, 58 (35%) patients developed local recurrence and 57 (34%) patients died. Median survival was 7.0 years postoperative: 8.4 years postoperative for EA patients and 6.4 years postoperative for EI patients (p = 0.023). The multivariate analysis showed that the EI cohort was significantly associated with an increased risk of local recurrence in comparison with the EA cohort (HR 7.02; 95% CI 2.96–16.6; p < 0.001), although no significant difference in survival was observed.

CONCLUSIONS

EA resection plays a major role in decreasing the risk for local recurrence in patients with chordoma of the mobile spine.

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Mark B. Dekutoski, Michelle J. Clarke, Peter Rose, Alessandro Luzzati, Laurence D. Rhines, Peter P. Varga, Charles G. Fisher, Dean Chou, Michael G. Fehlings, Jeremy J. Reynolds, Richard Williams, Nasir A. Quraishi, Niccole M. Germscheid, Daniel M. Sciubba, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Stefano Boriani and The AOSpine Knowledge Forum Tumor

OBJECTIVE

Primary spinal osteosarcomas are rare and aggressive neoplasms. Poor outcomes can occur, as obtaining marginal margins is technically demanding; further Enneking-appropriate en bloc resection can have significant morbidity. The goal of this study is to identify prognostic variables for local recurrence and mortality in surgically treated patients diagnosed with a primary osteosarcoma of the spine.

METHODS

A multicenter ambispective database of surgically treated patients with primary spine osteosarcomas was developed by AOSpine Knowledge Forum Tumor. Patient demographic, diagnosis, treatment, perioperative morbidity, local recurrence, and cross-sectional survival data were collected. Tumors were classified in 2 cohorts: Enneking appropriate (EA) and Enneking inappropriate (EI), as defined by pathology margin matching Enneking-recommended surgical margins. Prognostic variables were analyzed in reference to local recurrence and survival.

RESULTS

Between 1987 and 2012, 58 patients (32 female patients) underwent surgical treatment for primary spinal osteosarcoma. Patients were followed for a mean period of 3.5 ± 3.5 years (range 0.5 days to 14.3 years). The median survival for the entire cohort was 6.7 years postoperative. Twenty-four (41%) patients died, and 17 (30%) patients suffered a local recurrence, 10 (59%) of whom died. Twenty-nine (53%) patients underwent EA resection while 26 (47%) patients underwent EI resection with a postoperative median survival of 6.8 and 3.7 years, respectively (p = 0.048). EI patients had a higher rate of local recurrence than EA patients (p = 0.001). Patient age, previous surgery, biopsy type, tumor size, spine level, and chemotherapy timing did not significantly influence recurrence and survival.

CONCLUSIONS

Osteosarcoma of the spine presents a significant challenge, and most patients die in spite of aggressive surgery. There is a significant decrease in recurrence and an increase in survival with en bloc resection (EA) when compared with intralesional resection (EI). The effect of adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapeutics, as well as method of biopsy, requires further exploration.

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Nicolas Dea, Charles G. Fisher, Jeremy J. Reynolds, Joseph H. Schwab, Laurence D. Rhines, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Chetan Bettegowda, Arjun Sahgal, Áron Lazáry, Alessandro Luzzati, Stefano Boriani, Alessandro Gasbarrini, Ilya Laufer, Raphaële Charest-Morin, Feng Wei, William Teixeira, Niccole M. Germscheid, Francis J. Hornicek, Thomas F. DeLaney, John H. Shin and the AOSpine Knowledge Forum Tumor

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to investigate the spectrum of current treatment protocols for managing newly diagnosed chordoma of the mobile spine and sacrum.

METHODS

A survey on the treatment of spinal chordoma was distributed electronically to members of the AOSpine Knowledge Forum Tumor, including neurosurgeons, orthopedic surgeons, and radiation oncologists from North America, South America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. Survey participants were pre-identified clinicians from centers with expertise in the treatment of spinal tumors. The suvey responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics.

RESULTS

Thirty-nine of 43 (91%) participants completed the survey. Most (80%) indicated that they favor en bloc resection without preoperative neoadjuvant radiation therapy (RT) when en bloc resection is feasible with acceptable morbidity. The main area of disagreement was with the role of postoperative RT, where 41% preferred giving RT only if positive margins were achieved and 38% preferred giving RT irrespective of margin status. When en bloc resection would result in significant morbidity, 33% preferred planned intralesional resection followed by RT, and 33% preferred giving neoadjuvant RT prior to surgery. In total, 8 treatment protocols were identified: 3 in which en bloc resection is feasible with acceptable morbidity and 5 in which en bloc resection would result in significant morbidity.

CONCLUSIONS

The results confirm that there is treatment variability across centers worldwide for managing newly diagnosed chordoma of the mobile spine and sacrum. This information will be used to design an international prospective cohort study to determine the most appropriate treatment strategy for patients with spinal chordoma.

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Charles G. Fisher, Tony Goldschlager, Stefano Boriani, Peter Paul Varga, Laurence D. Rhines, Michael G. Fehlings, Alessandro Luzzati, Mark B. Dekutoski, Jeremy J. Reynolds, Dean Chou, Sigurd H. Berven, Richard P. Williams, Nasir A. Quraishi, Chetan Bettegowda and Ziya L. Gokaslan

Object

The National Institutes of Health recommends strategies to obtain evidence for the treatment of rare conditions such as primary tumors of the spine (PTSs). These tumors have a low incidence and are pathologically heterogeneous, and treatment approaches are diverse. Appropriate evidence-based care is imperative. Failure to follow validated oncological principles may lead to unnecessary mortality and profound morbidity. This paper outlines a scientific model that provides significant evidence guiding the treatment of PTSs.

Methods

A four-stage approach was used: 1) planning: data from large-volume centers were reviewed to provide insight; 2) recruitment: centers were enrolled and provided the necessary infrastructure; 3) retrospective stage: existing medical records were reviewed and completed with survival data; and 4) prospective stage: prospective data collection has been implemented. The AOSpine Knowledge Forum Tumor designed six modules: demographic, clinical, diagnostic, therapeutic, local recurrence, survival, and perioperative morbidity data fields and provided funding.

Results

It took 18 months to implement Stages 1–3, while Stage 4 is ongoing. A total of 1495 tumor cases were captured and diagnosed as one of 18 PTS histotypes. In addition, a PTS biobank network has been created to link clinical data with tumor pathology and molecular analysis.

Conclusions

This scientific model has not only aggregated a large amount of PTS data, but has also established an international collaborative network of spine oncology centers. Access to large volumes of data will generate further research to guide and enhance PTS clinical management. This model could be applied to other rare neoplastic conditions. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT01643174 (ClinicalTrials.gov).