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Bumsoo Park, Sung-Hyun Noh and Jeong-Yoon Park

OBJECTIVE

With the development of minimally invasive procedures, percutaneous pedicle screw systems have been used to attempt to correct spondylolisthesis. No previous studies have reported on reduction measures using long tab percutaneous pedicle screws for spondylolisthesis. Additional intraoperative correction has been proposed with the “swing” technique. This study was conducted to compare the efficacy of standard minimally invasive transforaminal interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) with the efficacy of MIS-TLIF with the “swing” technique (MIS-TLIF and swing) in lumbar spondylolisthesis.

METHODS

This was a matched-control study and included 30 consecutive patients who were followed up for 6 months after surgery. Of those patients, 15 were treated with operative reduction via MIS-TLIF with the “swing” technique, whereas the other 15 were treated with the standard MIS-TLIF procedure. The swing technique is a new reduction procedure for use with long tab percutaneous screws. In the swing technique, the entire system is swung back and forth several times after all constructs are placed. Only patients with Meyerding grade I or II lumbar spondylolisthesis were included in the study (18 with grade I and 12 with grade II). Perioperative and clinical outcomes, radiological parameters (Meyerding grade, percentage of slip, slip correction rate, segmental lordosis, and lumbar lordosis) were compared between groups at 6 months after surgery.

RESULTS

Demographic data did not differ significantly between the 2 groups. Postoperative clinical outcomes showed significant improvement in both groups. Postoperative radiological parameters showed that the degree of spondylolisthesis (swing: 4.7% vs standard: 8.9%) and reduction rate (swing: 77.3% vs standard: 57.1%) favored the swing group. The swing technique effectively decreased the degree of spondylolisthesis (swing: 24.1% to 4.7% vs standard: 21.8% to 8.9%). No complications related to the procedure were reported.

CONCLUSIONS

MIS-TLIF with the “swing” technique with long tab percutaneous pedicle screws is a safe and effective reduction method for monosegmental spondylolisthesis. This technique cannot only alleviate symptoms but also achieve nearly completely reduction of slippage.

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Hakseung Kim, Eun-Jin Jeong, Dae-Hyeon Park, Zofia Czosnyka, Byung C. Yoon, Keewon Kim, Marek Czosnyka and Dong-Joo Kim

OBJECT

Periventricular lucency (PVL) is often observed in the hydrocephalic brain on CT or MRI. Earlier studies have proposed the extravasation of ventricular CSF into the periventricular white matter or transependymal CSF absorption as possible causes of PVL in hydrocephalus. However, there is insufficient evidence for either theory to be conclusive.

METHODS

A finite element (FE) model of the hydrocephalic brain with detailed anatomical geometry was constructed to investigate the possible mechanism of PVL in hydrocephalus. The initiation of hydrocephalus was modeled by applying a transmantle pressure gradient (TPG). The model was exposed to varying TPGs to investigate the effects of different geometrical characteristics on the distribution of PVL. The edema map was derived based on the interstitial pore pressure.

RESULTS

The model simulated the main radiological features of hydrocephalus, i.e., ventriculomegaly and PVL. The degree of PVL, assessed by the pore pressure, was prominent in mild to moderate ventriculomegaly. As the degree of ventriculomegaly exceeded certain values, the pore pressure across the cerebrum became positive, thus inducing the disappearance of PVL.

CONCLUSIONS

The results are in accordance with common clinical findings of PVL. The degree of ventriculomegaly significantly influences the development of PVL, but two factors were not linearly correlated. The results are indicative of the transependymal CSF absorption as a possible cause of PVL, but the extravasation theory cannot be formally rejected.

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Jeong Yoon Park, Yong Eun Cho, Sung Uk Kuh, Jun Hyung Cho, Dong Kyu Chin, Byung Ho Jin and Keun Su Kim

Object.

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between adjacent-segment degeneration (ASD) and pelvic parameters in the patients with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis. Sagittal balance is the most important risk and prognostic factor in the development of ASD. The pelvic incidence angle (PIA) is an important anatomical parameter in determining the sagittal curvature of the spine and in the individual variability of the sacral slope and the lordotic curve. Thus, the authors evaluated the relationship between the pelvic parameters and the ASD.

Methods.

Among 132 patients with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis who underwent surgery at their institution, the authors selected patients in whom a one-stage, single-level, 360° fixation procedure was performed for Grade I spondylolisthesis and who underwent follow-up for more than 1 year. Parameters in 34 patients satisfied these conditions. Of the 34 patients, seven had ASD (Group 1) and 27 patients did not have ASD (Group 2). The investigators measured degree of spondylolisthesis, lordotic angle, sacral slope angle (SSA), pelvic tilt angle (PTA), PIA, and additional parameters pre-and postoperatively. The radiographic data were reviewed retrospectively.

Results.

The population consisted of nine men and 25 women whose mean age was 48.9 ± 9 years (± standard deviation) (range 28–65 years). Seven patients developed ASD after undergoing fusion. Of all the parameters, pre-and postoperative degree of spondylolisthesis, segmental lordosis, lordotic angle, SSA, preoperative PTA, and pre-operative PIA did not differ significantly between the two groups; only postoperative PTA and PIA were significantly different.

Conclusions.

The development of ASD is closely related to postoperative PIA and PTA, not preoperative PIA and PTA. The measurement of postoperative PIA can be used as a new indirect method to predict the ASD.

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Un Yong Choi, Jeong Yoon Park, Kyung Hyun Kim, Sung Uk Kuh, Dong Kyu Chin, Keun Su Kim and Yong Eun Cho

Object

Clinical results for unilateral pedicle screw fixation after lumbar interbody fusion have been reported to be as good as those for bilateral instrumentation. However, no studies have directly compared unilateral and bilateral percutaneous pedicle screw fixation after minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). The purpose of this study was to determine whether unilateral percutaneous pedicle screw fixation is comparable with bilateral percutaneous pedicle screw fixation in 1-segment MIS TLIF.

Methods

This was a prospective randomized study of 53 patients who underwent unilateral or bilateral percutaneous pedicle screw fixation after MIS TLIF for 1-segment lumbar degenerative disc disease. Twenty-six patients were assigned to a unilateral percutaneous pedicle screw fixation group and 27 patients were assigned to a bilateral percutaneous pedicle screw fixation group. Operative time, blood loss, clinical outcomes (that is, Oswestry Disability Index [ODI] and visual analog scale [VAS] scores), complication rates, and fusion rates were assessed using CT scanning 2 years after surgical treatment.

Results

The 2 groups were similar in age, sex, preoperative diagnosis, and operated level, and they did not differ significantly in the length of follow-up (27.5 [Group 1] vs 28.9 [Group 2] months) or clinical results. Both groups showed substantial improvements in VAS and ODI scores 2 years after surgical treatment. The groups differed significantly in operative time (unilateral 84.2 minutes; bilateral 137.6 minutes), blood loss (unilateral 92.7 ml; bilateral, 232.0 ml), fusion rate (unilateral 84.6%; bilateral 96.3%), and postoperative scoliotic change (unilateral 23.1%; bilateral 3.7%).

Conclusions

Unilateral and bilateral screw fixation after MIS TLIF produced similar clinical results. Although perioperative results were better with unilateral screw fixation, the long-term results were better with bilateral screw fixation, suggesting bilateral screw fixation is a better choice after MIS TLIF.

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Min A. Yoon, Eunhee Kim, Bae-Ju Kwon, Jeong Eun Kim, Hyun-Seung Kang, Jae Hyo Park, Chul-Ho Sohn, Ji-Hoon Kim and Dong Hoon Lee

Object

Reinforcement of aneurysms with additional wrapping is an alternative procedure if the aneurysm cannot be completely clipped. Wrapping with muslin (cotton gauze) rarely incites foreign body inflammatory reactions. In this study, the authors describe the clinical and radiological features of muslinomas or muslin-induced foreign body reactions that can develop after treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

Methods

Over a 3-year period, 5 patients with muslinomas underwent treatment at the authors' institution. All patients underwent aneursym clipping and wrapping, and were subsequently readmitted with acute or subacute neurological symptoms. Clinical and imaging features on diffusion weighted MR images and cerebral angiography images were retrospectively reviewed. The patients' clinical course and follow-up imaging studies were also evaluated.

Results

In all 5 cases, muslinomas were seen as rim-enhancing inflammatory masses around the clipped aneurysms with perilesional edema visible on MR images at the time of clinical deterioration. The MR images also demonstrated adhesive arachnoiditis with a sterile intracranial abscess in 3 patients, optic neuropathy in 2, parent artery narrowing in 2, and a resultant acute ischemic infarction in 1 patient. Follow-up imaging revealed resolution of both the perilesional edema and adhesive arachnoiditis but no significant changes in the muslinomas. All patients underwent conservative management and fully recovered, but during the follow-up period, 2 patients experienced clinical and radiological relapses.

Conclusions

When a patient with a history of wrapping of an aneurysm presents with acute neurological symptoms and an enhancing intracranial mass in the region of the surgical site on MR imaging, a muslin-induced foreign body inflammatory reaction should be considered in the differential diagnosis, and careful clinical and radiological follow-up is advised.