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  • Author or Editor: Jean A. Ouellet x
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Miguel Bertelli Ramos, Carolina Matté Dagostini, Oded Rabau, Rodrigo Navarro-Ramirez, Jean A. Ouellet, Asdrubal Falavigna and Alisson R. Teles

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to determine the publication rate of abstracts presented at the annual meetings of the AANS/CNS Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves (Spine Summit).

METHODS

The authors used a search algorithm in PubMed to determine the publication rate of abstracts presented at the Spine Summit from 2007 to 2012. The variables assessed were presentation modality, topic, meeting year, publication year, destiny journal and its 5-year impact factor (IF), country, and citation count (retrieved from the Scopus database).

RESULTS

One thousand four hundred thirty-six abstracts were analyzed; 502 were oral presentations and 934 were digital poster presentations. The publication rate was 53.97% (775/1436). The mean time from presentation to publication was 1.35 ± 1.97 years (95% CI 1.21–1.49 years). The mean citation count of published articles was 40.55 ± 55.21 (95% CI 36.66–44.44). Oral presentations had a higher publication rate (71.51%, 359/502) than digital posters (44.54%, 416/934; OR 3.13, 95% CI 2.48–3.95, p < 0.001). Oral presentations had a higher number of citations (55.51 ± 69.00, 95% CI 48.35–62.67) than digital posters (27.64 ± 34.88, 95% CI 24.28–31.00, p < 0.001). The mean IF of published articles was 3.48 ± 2.91 (95% CI 3.27–3.70). JNS: Spine (191/775, 24.64%), Spine (103/775, 13.29%), and Neurosurgery (56/775, 7.23%) had the greatest number of published articles. The US represented the highest number of published articles (616/775, 79.48%).

CONCLUSIONS

The publication rate of the Spine Summit is among the highest compared to other spine meetings. Many of the abstracts initially presented at the meeting are further published in high-IF journals and had a high citation count. Therefore, the Spine Summit maintains its high standards of scientific papers, which reflects the high quality of the research performed in the spine surgery field in North America.

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Alisson R. Teles, Michael Paci, Gabriel Gutman, Fahad H. Abduljabbar, Jean A. Ouellet, Michael H. Weber and Jeff D. Golan

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to evaluate the anatomical and surgical risk factors for screw-related facet joint violation at the superior level in lumbar fusion.

METHODS

The authors conducted a retrospective review of a consecutive series of posterior lumbar instrumented fusions performed by a single surgeon. Inclusion criteria were primary lumbar fusion of 1 or 2 levels for degenerative disorders. The following variables were analyzed as possible risk factors: surgical technique (percutaneous vs open screw placement), depth of surgical field, degree of anterior slippage of the superior level, pedicle and facet angle, and facet degeneration of the superior level. Postoperative CT scans were evaluated by 2 independent reviewers. Axial, sagittal, and coronal views were reviewed. Pedicle screws were graded as intra-articular if they clearly interposed between the superior and inferior facet joints of the superior level. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the factors associated with this complication.

RESULTS

One hundred thirty-one patients were included. Interobserver reliability for facet joint violation assessment was high (κ = 0.789). The incidence of superior facet joint violation was 12.59% per top-level screw (33 of 262 proximal screws). The rate of facet violation was 28.0% in the percutaneous technique group (14 of 50 patients) and 12.3% in the open surgery group (10 of 81 patients) (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.09–4.21; p = 0.024). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, independent predictors of facet violation were percutaneous screw placement (adjusted OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.42–7.73; p = 0.006), right-side pedicle screw (adjusted OR 3.14, 95% CI 1.29–7.63; p = 0.011), and facet angle > 45° (adjusted OR 10.95, 95% CI 4.64–25.84; p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS

The incidence of facet joint violation was higher in percutaneous minimally invasive than in open technique for posterior lumbar spine surgery. Also, coronal orientation of the facet joint is a significant risk factor independent of the surgical technique.