Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 132 items for

  • Author or Editor: Jason P. Sheehan x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Jason P. Sheehan

Object

Neurosurgical training is critical in providing residents with the skill set, knowledge, and confidence to perform challenging neurosurgical procedures. Radiosurgery, which neurosurgeons helped define and refine, differs from more traditional, open neurosurgical approaches. This study evaluates the opinions of residents on current radiosurgical training and the effect of a focused educational course on those residents.

Methods

The American Association of Neurological Surgeons sponsored a 3-day course focused on intracranial and spinal radiosurgery. Senior-level residents were nominated by US program directors to participate in the course. Twenty-eight residents from distinct training programs were surveyed before and after the course to discern current training practices in radiosurgery and the effect of the focused educational program. The median training level of the participants was postgraduate Year 5 (mean 5.3 years, range 3–7 years).

Results

Two-thirds of residents reported that their training institutions had no formal radiosurgery rotation. Twenty-five percent planned to obtain postresidency fellowship training that would include radiosurgery. Before the course, 79% of the residents expected to include radiosurgery in their practice. However, prior to the course, those describing themselves as “very uncomfortable” with performing intracranial or spinal radiosurgery were 33.3 and 45.8%, respectively. After the course, mean self-assessment scores for understanding the indications and performing intracranial radiosurgery increased by 43 and 89%, respectively. The mean scores for understanding the indications and comfort with performing spinal radiosurgery increased by 79 and 200%, respectively. Following the course, there was a 12.3% increase in the number of residents planning to perform radiosurgery following residency.

Conclusions

Current neurosurgical residents appear uneasy about their grasp of radiosurgical indications and their ability to perform the procedure. Focused training courses sponsored by professional societies may improve resident education and training in this area of neurosurgery, which has a skill set and basis of knowledge different from traditional open neurosurgical procedures. Further evaluation of the radiosurgical training process for residents must be performed so as to ensure competency and sufficient workforce to meet expanding demands for neurosurgeons performing radiosurgery in a multidisciplinary climate.

Free access

Jason P. Sheehan

Full access

Jason P. Sheehan and Jay Jagannathan

Intracranial radiosurgery has been proved effective for the treatment of brain metastasis. The treatment of paraspinal and spinal metastasis with spinal radiosurgery represents a natural extension of the principles of intracranial radiosurgery. However, spinal radiosurgery is a far more complicated process than intracranial radiosurgery. Larger treatment volumes, numerous organs at risk, and the inability to utilize rigid, frame-based immobilization all contribute to the substantially more complex process of spinal radiosurgery.

Beyond the convenience of a shorter duration of treatment for the patient, spinal radiosurgery affords a greater biological equivalent dose to a metastatic lesion than conventional radiotherapy fractionation schemes. This appears to translate into a high rate of tumor control and fast pain relief for patients. The minimally invasive nature of this approach is consistent with trends in open spinal surgery and helps to maintain or improve a patient's quality of life. Spinal radiosurgery has expanded the neurosurgical treatment armamentarium for patients with spinal and paraspinal metastasis.

Free access

James P. Caruso and Jason P. Sheehan

At the peak of his career, Walter J. Freeman II was a celebrated physician and scientist. He served as the first chairman of the Department of Neurology at George Washington University and was a tireless advocate of surgical treatment for mental illness. His eccentric appearance, engaging personality during interviews, and theatrical demonstrations of his surgical techniques gained him substantial popularity with local and national media, and he performed more than 3000 prefrontal and transorbital lobotomies between 1930 and 1960. However, poor patient outcomes, unfavorable portrayals of the lobotomy in literature and film, and increased regulatory scrutiny contributed to the lobotomy’s decline in popularity. The development of antipsychotic medications eventually relegated the lobotomy to rare circumstances, and Freeman’s reputation deteriorated. Today, despite significant advancements in technique, oversight, and ethical scrutiny, neurosurgical treatment of mental illness still carries a degree of social stigma.

This review presents a historical account of Walter Freeman’s life and career, and the popularization of the lobotomy in the US. Additionally, the authors pay special attention to the influence of popular literature and film on the public’s perception of psychosurgery. Aided by an understanding of this pivotal period in medical history, neurosurgeons are poised to confront the ethical and sociological questions facing psychosurgery as it continues to evolve.

Restricted access

Christopher P. Cifarelli, David J. Schlesinger and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) has become a significant component of neurosurgical treatment for recurrent secretory and nonsecretory pituitary adenomas. Although the long-term risks of visual dysfunction following microsurgical resection of pituitary adenomas has been well studied, the comparable risk following radiosurgery is not well defined. This study evaluates the long-term risks of ophthalmological dysfunction following GKS for recurrent pituitary adenomas.

Methods

An analysis of 217 patients with recurrent secretory (n = 131) and nonsecretory (n = 86) pituitary adenomas was performed to determine the incidence of and risk factors for subsequent development of visual dysfunction. Patients underwent ophthalmological evaluation as part of post-GKS follow-up to assess for new or worsened cranial nerve II, III, IV, or VI palsies. The median follow-up duration was 32 months. The median maximal dose was 50 Gy, and the median peripheral dose was 23 Gy. A univariate analysis was performed to assess for risk factors of visual dysfunction post-GKS.

Results

Nine patients (4%) developed new visual dysfunctions, and these occurred within 6 hours to 34 months following radiosurgery. None of these 9 patients had tumor growth on post-GKS neuroimaging studies. Three of these patients had permanent deficits whereas in 6 the deficits resolved. Five of the 9 patients had prior GKS or radiotherapy, which resulted in a significant increase in the incidence of cranial nerve dysfunction (p = 0.0008). An increased number of isocenters (7.1 vs 5.0, p = 0.048) was statistically related to the development of visual dysfunction. Maximal dose, margin dose, optic apparatus dose, tumor volume, cavernous sinus involvement, and suprasellar extension were not significantly related to visual dysfunction (p >0.05).

Conclusions

Neurological and ophthalmological assessment in addition to routine neuroimaging and endocrinological follow-up are important to perform following GKS. Patients with a history of radiosurgery or radiation therapy are at higher risk of cranial nerve deficits. Also, a reduction in the number of isocenters delivered, along with volume treated, particularly in the patients with secretory tumors, appears to be the most reasonable strategy to minimize the risk to the visual system when treating recurrent pituitary adenomas with stereotactic radiosurgery.

Free access

Alana Tooze and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

Pituitary adenomas and the treatment required for the underlying neuropathology have frequently been associated with cognitive dysfunction. However, the mechanisms for these impairments remain the subject of much debate. The authors evaluated cognitive outcomes in patients treated with or without Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for an underlying pituitary adenoma.

METHODS

This was a retrospective, institutional review board–approved, single-institution study. A total of 51 patients (23 male, 28 female) treated for pituitary adenoma were included in this neurocognitive study. Twenty-one patients underwent GKRS following transsphenoidal surgery, 22 patients were treated with transsphenoidal surgery alone, and eight patients were conservatively managed or were treated with medical management alone. Comparisons using psychometric tests of general intellectual abilities, memory, and executive functions were made between the treatment groups, between male and female patients, and between patients with Cushing’s disease and those with nonfunctioning adenoma (NFA).

RESULTS

The entire patient sample, the NFA group, and the GKRS group scored significantly below expected on measures of both immediate and delayed memory, particularly for visually presented information (p ≤ 0.05); however, there were no significant differences between the patients with Cushing’s disease and those with NFA (t ≤ 0.56, p ≥ 0.52). In those who underwent GKRS, memory scores were not significantly different from those in the patients who did not undergo GKRS (t ≤ 1.32, p ≥ 0.19). Male patients across the sample were more likely to demonstrate impairments in both immediate memory (t = −3.41, p = 0.003) and delayed memory (t = −3.80, p = 0.001) than were female patients (t ≤ 1.09, p ≥ 0.29). There were no impairments on measures of general intellectual functioning or executive functions in any patient group. The potential contributions of tumor size and hormone levels are discussed.

CONCLUSIONS

Overall, pituitary adenoma patients demonstrated relative impairment in anterograde memory. However, GKRS did not lead to adverse effects for immediate or delayed memory in pituitary adenoma patients. Cognitive assessment of pituitary adenoma patients is important in their longitudinal care.

Restricted access

Mohamed Elsharkawy, Zhiyuan Xu, David Schlesinger and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

Most intracranial schwannomas arise from cranial nerve (CN) VIII. Stereotactic radiosurgery is a mainstay of treatment for vestibular schwannomas. Intracranial schwannomas arising from other CNs are much less common. We evaluate the efficacy of Gamma Knife surgery on nonvestibular schwannomas including trigeminal, hypoglossal, abducent, facial, trochlear, oculomotor, glossopharyngeal, and jugular foramen tumors.

Methods

Thirty-six patients with nonvestibular schwannomas were treated at the University of Virginia Gamma Knife center from 1989 to 2008. The median patient age was 48 years (mean 45.6 years, range 10–72 years). Schwannomas arose from the following CNs: CN III (in 1 patient), CN IV (in 1), CN V (in 25), CN VI (in 2), CN VII (in 1), CN IX (in 1), and CN XII (in 3). In 2 patients, tumors arose from the jugular foramen. The median tumor volume was 2.9 cm3 (mean 3.3 cm3, range 0.07–8.8 cm3). The median margin dose was 13.5 Gy (range 9.3–20 Gy); the median maximum dose was 30 Gy (range 21.7–50.0 Gy).

Results

The mean and median follow-up times of 36 patients were 54 and 37 months, respectively (range 2–180 months). At the last radiological follow-up, the tumor size had decreased in 20 patients, remained stable in 9 patients, and increased in 7 patients. The 2-year actuarial progression-free survival was 91%. Higher maximum dose was statistically related to tumor control (p = 0.027).

Thirty-three patients had adequate clinical follow-up. Among them, 21 patients had improvement in their presenting symptoms, 8 patients were stable after treatment with no worsening of their presenting symptoms, 2 patients developed new symptoms, and 1 patient experienced symptom deterioration. Notably, 1 patient with neurofibromatosis Type 2 developed new symptoms that were unrelated to the tumor treated with Gamma Knife surgery.

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery is a reasonably effective treatment option for patients with nonvestibular schwannomas. Patients require careful follow-up for tumor progression and signs of neurological deterioration.

Free access

Douglas Kondziolka