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  • Author or Editor: Jason L. Schroeder x
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Jason L. Schroeder, Jason M. Highsmith, Harold F. Young and Bruce E. Mathern

Object

Few therapies have consistently demonstrated effectiveness in preserving O2 delivery after spinal cord injury (SCI). Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) offer great promise to carry and deliver O2 more efficiently than conventional measures. The authors investigated the use of Clark-type microelectrodes to monitor spinal cord oxygenation directly (intraparenchymal [IP] recording) and indirectly (cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] recording) in the context of SCI, O2 therapy, and PFC treatment.

Methods

After placement of a subdural/CSF Licox probe in rats, incremental increases in the fraction of inspired O2 (FiO2) up to 100% were administered to establish a dose-response curve. The probe was then placed in the parenchyma of the same animals for a second dose-response curve. In a second study, rats with CSF or IP probes underwent SCI with the NYU Impactor and treatment with O2, followed by administration of PFC, or saline in the control group.

Results

All animals in the first experiment responded to the FiO2 dose increase, with changes in PO2 evident in both CSF and IP levels. The SCI in the second experiment caused a marked drop in PO2 from a mean of 21.4 to 10.4 mm Hg, with most animals dropping to less than half their preinjury value. All animals responded to 100% O2 treatment. Every animal that received PFCs showed significant improvement, with a mean increase in PO2 of 23.3 mm Hg. Only 1 saline-treated animal showed any benefit. Oxygen values in the PFC treatment group reached up to 6 times the normal level.

Conclusions

Oxygen levels in SCI show a profound drop almost immediately postinjury. Administration of PFCs combined with 100% O2 therapy can reverse tissue hypoxia and holds promise for reducing ischemic injury.

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Matthew M. Grabowski, Pablo F. Recinos, Amy S. Nowacki, Jason L. Schroeder, Lilyana Angelov, Gene H. Barnett and Michael A. Vogelbaum

Object

The impact of extent of resection (EOR) on survival for patients with glioblastoma (GBM) continues to be a point of debate despite multiple studies demonstrating that increasing EOR likely extends survival for these patients. In addition, contrast-enhancing residual tumor volume (CE-RTV) alone has rarely been analyzed quantitatively to determine if it is a predictor of outcome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of CE-RTV and T2/FLAIR residual volume (T2/F-RV) on overall survival.

Methods

A retrospective review of 128 patients who underwent primary resection of supratentorial GBM followed by standard radiation/chemotherapy was undertaken utilizing quantitative, volumetric analysis of pre- and postoperative MR images. The results were compared with clinical data obtained from the patients' medical records.

Results

At analysis, 8% of patients were alive, and no patients were lost to follow-up. The overall median survival was 13.8 months, with a median Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score of 90 at presentation. The median contrast-enhancing preoperative tumor volume (CE-PTV) was 29.0 cm3, and CE-RTV was 1.2 cm3, equating to a 95.8% median EOR. The median T2/F-RV was 36.8 cm3. CE-PTV, CE-RTV, T2/F-RV, and EOR were all statistically significant predictors of survival when controlling for age and KPS score. A statistically significant benefit in survival was seen with a CE-RTV less than 2 cm3 or an EOR greater than 98%. Evaluation of the volumetric analysis methodology was performed by observers of varying degrees of experience—an attending neurosurgeon, a fellow, and a medical student. Both the medical student and fellow recorded correlation coefficients of 0.98 when compared with the attending surgeon's measured volumes of CE-PTV, while for CE-RTV, correlation coefficients of 0.67 and 0.71 (medical student and fellow, respectively) were obtained.

Conclusions

CE-RTV and EOR were found to be significant predictors of survival after GBM resection. CERTV was the more significant predictor of survival compared with EOR, suggesting that the volume of residual contrast-enhancing tumor may be a more accurate and meaningful reflection of the pathobiology of GBM.

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Alireza M. Mohammadi, Jason L. Schroeder, Lilyana Angelov, Samuel T. Chao, Erin S. Murphy, Jennifer S. Yu, Gennady Neyman, Xuefei Jia, John H. Suh, Gene H. Barnett and Michael A. Vogelbaum

OBJECTIVE

The impact of the stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) prescription dose (PD) on local progression and radiation necrosis for small (≤ 2 cm) brain metastases was evaluated.

METHODS

An institutional review board–approved retrospective review was performed on 896 patients with brain metastases ≤ 2 cm (3034 tumors) who were treated with 1229 SRS procedures between 2000 and 2012. Local progression and/or radiation necrosis were the primary end points. Each tumor was followed from the date of radiosurgery until one of the end points was reached or the last MRI follow-up. Various criteria were used to differentiate tumor progression and radiation necrosis, including the evaluation of serial MRIs, cerebral blood volume on perfusion MR, FDG-PET scans, and, in some cases, surgical pathology. The median radiographic follow-up per lesion was 6.2 months.

RESULTS

The median patient age was 56 years, and 56% of the patients were female. The most common primary pathology was non–small cell lung cancer (44%), followed by breast cancer (19%), renal cell carcinoma (14%), melanoma (11%), and small cell lung cancer (5%). The median tumor volume and median largest diameter were 0.16 cm3 and 0.8 cm, respectively. In total, 1018 lesions (34%) were larger than 1 cm in maximum diameter. The PD for 2410 tumors (80%) was 24 Gy, for 408 tumors (13%) it was 19 to 23 Gy, and for 216 tumors (7%) it was 15 to 18 Gy. In total, 87 patients (10%) had local progression of 104 tumors (3%), and 148 patients (17%) had at least radiographic evidence of radiation necrosis involving 199 tumors (7%; 4% were symptomatic). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed for local progression and radiation necrosis. For local progression, tumors less than 1 cm (subhazard ratio [SHR] 2.32; p < 0.001), PD of 24 Gy (SHR 1.84; p = 0.01), and additional whole-brain radiation therapy (SHR 2.53; p = 0.001) were independently associated with better outcome. For the development of radiographic radiation necrosis, independent prognostic factors included size greater than 1 cm (SHR 2.13; p < 0.001), location in the corpus callosum (SHR 5.72; p < 0.001), and uncommon pathologies (SHR 1.65; p = 0.05). Size (SHR 4.78; p < 0.001) and location (SHR 7.62; p < 0.001)—but not uncommon pathologies—were independent prognostic factors for the subgroup with symptomatic radiation necrosis.

CONCLUSIONS

A PD of 24 Gy results in significantly better local control of metastases measuring < 2 cm than lower doses. In addition, tumor size is an independent prognostic factor for both local progression and radiation necrosis. Some tumor pathologies and locations may also contribute to an increased risk of radiation necrosis.

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Mayur Sharma, Jason L. Schroeder, Paul Elson, Antonio Meola, Gene H. Barnett, Michael A. Vogelbaum, John H. Suh, Samuel T. Chao, Alireza M. Mohammadi, Glen H. J. Stevens, Erin S. Murphy and Lilyana Angelov

OBJECTIVE

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most malignant form of astrocytoma. The average survival is 6–10 months in patients with recurrent GBM (rGBM). In this study, the authors evaluated the role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with rGBMs.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective review of their brain tumor database (1997–2016). Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) after salvage SRS were the primary endpoints evaluated. Response to SRS was assessed using volumetric MR images.

RESULTS

Fifty-three patients with rGBM underwent salvage SRS targeting 75 lesions. The median tumor diameter and volume were 2.55 cm and 3.80 cm3, respectively. The median prescription dose was 18 Gy (range 12–24 Gy) and the homogeneity index was 1.90 (range 1.11–2.02). The median OS after salvage SRS was estimated to be 11.0 months (95% CI 7.1–12.2) and the median PFS after salvage SRS was 4.4 months (95% CI 3.7–5.0). A Karnofsky Performance Scale score ≥ 80 was independently associated with longer OS, while small tumor volume (< 15 cm3) and less homogeneous treatment plans (homogeneity index > 1.75) were both independently associated with longer OS (p = 0.007 and 0.03) and PFS (p = 0.01 and 0.002, respectively). Based on these factors, 2 prognostic groups were identified for PFS (5.4 vs 3.2 months), while 3 were identified for OS (median OS of 15.2 vs 10.5 vs 5.2 months).

CONCLUSIONS

SRS is associated with longer OS and/or PFS in patients with good performance status, small-volume tumor recurrences, and heterogeneous treatment plans. The authors propose a prognostic model to identify a cohort of rGBM patients who may benefit from SRS.