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Robert M. Starke, Brian J. Williams, Claire Hiles, James H. Nguyen, Mohamed Y. Elsharkawy and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

Skull base meningiomas are challenging tumors owing in part to their close proximity to important neurovascular structures. Complete microsurgical resection can be associated with significant morbidity, and recurrence rates are not inconsequential. In this study, the authors evaluate the outcomes of skull base meningiomas treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) both as an adjunct to microsurgery and as a primary treatment modality.

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective review of a prospectively compiled database detailing the outcomes in 255 patients with skull base meningiomas treated at the University of Virginia from 1989 to 2006. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 24 months. The group comprised 54 male and 201 female patients, with a median age of 55 years (range 19–85 years). One hundred nine patients were treated with upfront radiosurgery, and 146 patients were treated with GKS following resection. Patients were assessed clinically and radiographically at routine intervals following GKS. Factors predictive of new neurological deficit following GKS were assessed via univariate and multivariate analysis, and Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox multivariate regression analysis were used to assess factors predictive of tumor progression.

Results

Meningiomas were centered over the cerebellopontine angle in 43 patients (17%), the clivus in 40 (16%), the petroclival region in 28 (11%), the petrous region in 6 (2%), and the parasellar region in 138 (54%). The median duration of follow-up was 6.5 years (range 2–18 years). The mean preradiosurgery tumor volume was 5.0 cm3 (range 0.3–54.8 cm3).

At most recent follow-up, 220 patients (86%) displayed either no change or a decrease in tumor volume, and 35 (14%) displayed an increase in volume. Actuarial progression-free survival at 3, 5, and 10 years was 99%, 96%, and 79%, respectively. In Cox multivariate analysis, pre-GKS covariates associated with tumor progression included age greater then 65 years (HR 3.41, 95% CI 1.63–7.13, p = 0.001) and decreasing dose to tumor margin (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.80–1.00, p = 0.05).

At most recent clinical follow-up, 230 patients (90%) demonstrated no change or improvement in their neurological condition and the condition of 25 patients had deteriorated (10%). In multivariate analysis, the factors predictive of new or worsening symptoms were increasing duration of follow-up (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00–1.02, p = 0.015), tumor progression (OR 2.91, 95% CI 1.60–5.31, p < 0.001), decreasing maximum dose (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.84–0.97, p = 0.007), and petrous or clival location versus parasellar, petroclival, and cerebellopontine angle location (OR 3.47, 95% CI 1.23–9.74, p = 0.018).

Conclusions

Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high rate of tumor control and neurological preservation in patients with skull base meningiomas. After radiosurgery, better outcomes were observed for those receiving an optimal radiosurgery dose and harboring tumors located in a cerebellopontine angle, parasellar, or petroclival location.

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Chun Po Yen, Stephen J. Monteith, James H. Nguyen, Jessica Rainey, David J. Schlesinger and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term imaging and clinical outcomes of intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in children treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS).

Methods

Between 1989 and 2007, 200 patients with AVMs who were 18 years of age or younger were treated at the University of Virginia Health System. Excluding 14 patients who had not reached 2-year follow-up, 186 patients comprised this study. Hemorrhage was the most common presenting symptom leading to the diagnosis of AVMs (71.5%). The mean nidus volume was 3.2 cm3 at the time of GKS, and a mean prescription dose of 21.9 Gy was used.

Results

After initial GKS, 49.5% of patients achieved total angiographic obliteration. Forty-one patients whose AVM nidi remained patent underwent additional GKS. The obliteration rate increased to 58.6% after a second or multiple GKS. Subtotal obliteration was achieved in 9 patients (4.8%). Forty-nine patients (26.3%) still had a patent residual nidus. In 19 patients (10.2%), obliteration was confirmed on MR imaging only. Ten patients had 17 hemorrhages during the follow-up period. The hemorrhage rate was 5.4% within 2 years after GKS and 0.8% between 2 and 5 years. Six patients developed neurological deficits along with the radiation-induced changes. Two patients developed asymptomatic meningiomas 10 and 12 years after GKS. After a mean clinical follow-up of 98 months, less than 4% of patients had difficulty attending school or developing a career.

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery offers a reasonable chance of obliteration of an AVM in pediatric patients. The incidence of symptomatic radiation-induced changes is relatively low; however, long-term clinical and imaging follow-up is required to identify delayed cyst formation and secondary tumors.

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Robert M. Starke, James H. Nguyen, Jessica Rainey, Brian J. Williams, Jonathan H. Sherman, Jesse Savage, Chun Po Yen and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

Although numerous studies have analyzed the role of stereotactic radiosurgery for intracranial meningiomas, few studies have assessed outcomes of posterior fossa meningiomas after stereotactic radiosurgery. In this study, the authors evaluate the outcomes of posterior fossa meningiomas treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS). The authors also assess factors predictive of new postoperative neurological deficits and tumor progression.

Methods

A retrospective review was performed of a prospectively compiled database documenting the outcomes of 152 patients with posterior fossa meningiomas treated at the University of Virginia from 1990 to 2006. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 24 months. There were 30 males and 122 females, with a median age of 58 years (range 12–82 years). Seventy-five patients were treated with radiosurgery initially, and 77 patients were treated with GKS after resection. Patients were assessed clinically and radiographically at routine intervals following GKS. Factors predictive of new neurological deficit following GKS were assessed via univariate and multivariate analysis, and Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox multivariate regression analysis were used to assess factors predictive of tumor progression.

Results

Patients had meningiomas centered over the tentorium (35 patients, 23%), cerebellopontine angle (43 patients, 28%), petroclival region (28 patients, 18%), petrous region (6 patients, 4%), and clivus (40 patients, 26%). The median follow-up was 7 years (range 2–16 years). The mean preradiosurgical tumor volume was 5.7 cm3 (range 0.3–33 cm3), and mean postradiosurgical tumor volume was 4.9 cm3 (range 0.1–33 cm3). At last follow-up, 55 patients (36%) displayed no change in tumor volume, 78 (51%) displayed a decrease in volume, and 19 (13%) displayed an increase in volume. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated radiographic progression-free survival at 3, 5, and 10 years to be 98%, 96%, and 78%, respectively. In Cox multivariable analysis, pre-GKS covariates associated with tumor progression included age greater than 65 years (hazard ratio [HR] 3.24, 95% CI 1.12–9.37; p = 0.03) and a low dose to the tumor margin (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.60–0.97; p = 0.03), and post-GKS covariates included shunt-dependent hydrocephalus (HR 25.0, 95% CI 3.72–100.0; p = 0.001). At last clinical follow-up, 139 patients (91%) demonstrated no change or improvement in their neurological condition, and 13 patients showed symptom deterioration (9%). In multivariate analysis, the only factors predictive of new or worsening symptoms were clival or petrous location (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.1–13.7; p = 0.03).

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery offers an acceptable rate of tumor control for posterior fossa meningiomas and accomplishes this with a low incidence of neurological deficits. In patients selected for GKS, tumor progression is associated with age greater than 65 years and decreasing dose to the tumor margin. Clival- or petrous-based locations are predictive of an increased risk of new or worsening neurological deficit following GKS.

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Brian J. Williams, Chun Po Yen, Robert M. Starke, Bhuvaneswara Basina, James Nguyen, Jessica Rainey, Jonathan H. Sherman, David Schlesinger and Jason P. Sheehan

Object

Stereotactic radiosurgery serves as an important primary and adjuvant treatment option for patients with many types of intracranial meningiomas. This is particularly true for patients with parasellar meningiomas. In this study, the authors evaluated the outcomes of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) used to treat parasellar meningiomas.

Methods

The study is a retrospective review of the outcomes in 138 patients with meningiomas treated at the University of Virginia from 1989 to 2006; all patients had a minimum follow-up of 24 months. There were 31 men and 107 women whose mean age was 54 years (range 19–85 years). Eighty-four patients had previously undergone resection. The mean pre-GKS tumor volume was 7.5 ml (range 0.2–54.8 ml). Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed, and factors related to favorable outcomes in each case were assessed.

Results

The mean follow-up duration was 84 months (median 75.5 months, range 24–216 months). In 118 patients (86%), the tumor volume was unchanged or had decreased at last follow-up. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated radiographic progression-free survival at 5 and 10 years to be 95.4% and 69%, respectively. Fourteen patients (10%) developed new cranial nerve palsies following GKS. Factors associated with tumor control included younger age, a higher isodose, and smaller tumor volume. A longer follow-up duration was associated with either a decrease or increase in tumor volume. Fourteen patients (10%) experienced new or worsening cranial nerve deficits after treatment. Factors associated with this occurrence were larger pretreatment tumor volume, lower peripheral radiation dose, lower maximum dose, tumor progression, and longer follow-up.

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery offers an acceptable rate of tumor control for parasellar meningiomas and accomplishes this with a low incidence of neurological deficits. Radiological control after radiosurgery is more likely in those patients with a smaller tumor volume and a higher prescription dose.

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Robert M. Starke, Colin J. Przybylowski, Mukherjee Sugoto, Francis Fezeu, Ahmed J. Awad, Dale Ding, James H. Nguyen and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECT

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has become a common treatment modality for intracranial meningiomas. Skull base meningiomas greater than 8 cm3 in volume have been found to have worse outcomes following SRS. When symptomatic, patients with these tumors are often initially treated with resection. For tumors located in close proximity to eloquent structures or in patients unwilling or unable to undergo a resection, SRS may be an acceptable therapeutic approach. In this study, the authors review the SRS outcomes of skull base meningiomas greater than 8 cm3 in volume, which corresponds to a lesion with an approximate diameter of 2.5 cm.

METHODS

The authors reviewed the data in a prospectively compiled database documenting the outcomes of 469 patients with skull base meningiomas treated with single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS). Seventy-five patients had tumors greater than 8 cm3 in volume, which was defined as a large tumor. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 6 months, but patients were included if they had a complication at any time point. Thirty patients were treated with upfront GKRS, and 45 were treated following microsurgery. Patient and tumor characteristics were assessed to determine predictors of new or worsening neurological function and tumor progression following GKRS.

RESULTS

After a mean follow-up of 6.5 years (range 0.5–21 years), the tumor volume was unchanged in 37 patients (49%), decreased in 26 patients (35%), and increased in 12 patients (16%). Actuarial rates of progression-free survival at 3, 5, and 10 years were 90.3%, 88.6%, and 77.2%, respectively. Four patients had new or worsened edema following GKRS, but preexisting edema decreased in 3 patients. In Cox multivariable analysis, covariates associated with tumor progression were 1) presentation with any cranial nerve (CN) deficit from III to VI (hazard ratio [HR] 3.78, 95% CI 1.91–7.45; p < 0.001), history of radiotherapy (HR 12.06, 95% CI 2.04–71.27; p = 0.006), and tumor volume greater than 14 cm3 (HR 6.86, 95% CI 0.88–53.36; p = 0.066). In those patients with detailed clinical follow-up (n = 64), neurological function was unchanged in 37 patients (58%), improved in 16 patients (25%), and deteriorated in 11 patients (17%). In multivariate analysis, the factors predictive of new or worsening neurological function were history of surgery (OR 3.00, 95% CI 1.13–7.95; p = 0.027), presentation with any CN deficit from III to VI (OR 3.94, 95% CI 1.49–10.24; p = 0.007), and decreasing maximal dose (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.63–0.93; p = 0.007). Tumor progression was present in 64% of patients with new or worsening neurological decline.

CONCLUSIONS

Stereotactic radiosurgery affords a reasonable rate of tumor control for large skull base meningiomas and does so with a low incidence of neurological deficits. Those with a tumor less than 14 cm3 in volume and without presenting CN deficit from III to VI were more likely to have effective tumor control.

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Thomas J. Buell, James H. Nguyen, Marcus D. Mazur, Jeffrey P. Mullin, Juanita Garces, Davis G. Taylor, Chun-Po Yen, Mark E. Shaffrey, Christopher I. Shaffrey and Justin S. Smith

OBJECTIVE

Fixed sagittal spinal malalignment is a common problem in adult spinal deformity (ASD). Various three-column osteotomy techniques, including the extended pedicle subtraction osteotomy (ePSO), may correct global and regional malalignment in this patient population. In contrast to the number of reports on traditional PSO (Schwab grade 3 osteotomy), there is limited literature on the outcomes of ePSO (Schwab grade 4 osteotomy) in ASD surgery. The objective of this retrospective study was to provide focused investigation of radiographic outcomes and complications of single-level lumbar ePSO for ASD patients with fixed sagittal malalignment.

METHODS

Consecutive ASD patients in whom sagittal malalignment had been treated with single-level lumbar ePSO at the authors’ institution between 2010 and 2015 were analyzed, and those with a minimum 2-year follow-up were included in the study. Radiographic analyses included assessments of segmental lordosis through the ePSO site (sagittal Cobb angle measured from the superior endplate of the vertebra above and inferior endplate of the vertebra below the ePSO), lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic tilt (PT), pelvic incidence and LL mismatch, thoracic kyphosis (TK), and sagittal vertical axis (SVA) on standing long-cassette radiographs. Complications were analyzed for the entire group.

RESULTS

Among 71 potentially eligible patients, 55 (77%) had a minimum 2-year follow-up and were included in the study. Overall, the average postoperative increases in ePSO segmental lordosis and overall LL were 41° ± 14° (range 7°–69°, p < 0.001) and 38° ± 11° (range 9°–58°, p < 0.001), respectively. The average SVA improvement was 13 ± 7 cm (range of correction: −33.6 to 3.4 cm, p < 0.001). These measurements were maintained when comparing early postoperative to last follow-up values, respectively (mean follow-up 52 months, range 26–97 months): ePSO segmental lordosis, 34° vs 33°, p = 0.270; LL, 47.3° vs 46.7°, p = 0.339; and SVA, 4 vs 5 cm, p = 0.330. Rod fracture (RF) at the ePSO site occurred in 18.2% (10/55) of patients, and pseudarthrosis (PA) at the ePSO site was confirmed by CT imaging or during rod revision surgery in 14.5% (8/55) of patients. Accessory supplemental rods across the ePSO site, a more recently employed technique, significantly reduced the occurrence of RF or PA on univariate (p = 0.004) and multivariable (OR 0.062, 95% CI 0.007–0.553, p = 0.013) analyses; this effect approached statistical significance on Kaplan-Meier analysis (p = 0.053, log-rank test). Interbody cage placement at the ePSO site resulted in greater ePSO segmental lordosis correction (45° vs 35°, p = 0.007) without significant change in RF or PA (p = 0.304). Transient and persistent motor deficits occurred in 14.5% (8/55) and 1.8% (1/55) of patients, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Extended PSO is an effective technique to correct fixed sagittal malalignment for ASD. In comparison to traditional PSO techniques, ePSO may allow greater focal correction with comparable complication rates, especially with interbody cage placement at the ePSO site and the use of accessory supplemental rods.

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James H. Nguyen, Thomas J. Buell, Tony R. Wang, Jeffrey P. Mullin, Marcus D. Mazur, Juanita Garces, Davis G. Taylor, Chun-Po Yen, Christopher I. Shaffrey and Justin S. Smith

OBJECTIVE

Recent literature describing complications associated with spinopelvic fixation with iliac screws in adult patients has been limited but has suggested high complication rates. The authors’ objective was to report their experience with iliac screw fixation in a large series of patients with a 2-year minimum follow-up.

METHODS

Of 327 adult patients undergoing spinopelvic fixation with iliac screws at the authors’ institution between 2010 and 2015, 260 met the study inclusion criteria (age ≥ 18 years, first-time iliac screw placement, and 2-year minimum follow-up). Patients with active spinal infection were excluded. All iliac screws were placed via a posterior midline approach using fluoroscopic guidance. Iliac screw heads were deeply recessed into the posterior superior iliac spine. Clinical and radiographic data were obtained and analyzed.

RESULTS

Twenty patients (7.7%) had iliac screw–related complication, which included fracture (12, 4.6%) and/or screw loosening (9, 3.5%). No patients had iliac screw head prominence that required revision surgery or resulted in pain, wound dehiscence, or poor cosmesis. Eleven patients (4.2%) had rod or connector fracture below S1. Overall, 23 patients (8.8%) had L5–S1 pseudarthrosis. Four patients (1.5%) had fracture of the S1 screw. Seven patients (2.7%) had wound dehiscence (unrelated to the iliac screw head) or infection. The rate of reoperation (excluding proximal junctional kyphosis) was 17.7%. On univariate analysis, an iliac screw–related complication rate was significantly associated with revision fusion (70.0% vs 41.2%, p = 0.013), a greater number of instrumented vertebrae (mean 12.6 vs 10.3, p = 0.014), and greater postoperative pelvic tilt (mean 27.7° vs 23.2°, p = 0.04). Lumbosacral junction–related complications were associated with a greater mean number of instrumented vertebrae (12.6 vs 10.3, p = 0.014). Reoperation was associated with a younger mean age at surgery (61.8 vs 65.8 years, p = 0.014), a greater mean number of instrumented vertebrae (12.2 vs 10.2, p = 0.001), and longer clinical and radiological mean follow-up duration (55.8 vs 44.5 months, p < 0.001; 55.8 vs 44.6 months, p < 0.001, respectively). On multivariate analysis, reoperation was associated with longer clinical follow-up (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Previous studies on iliac screw fixation have reported very high rates of complications and reoperation (as high as 53.6%). In this large, single-center series of adult patients, iliac screws were an effective method of spinopelvic fixation that had high rates of lumbosacral fusion and far lower complication rates than previously reported. Collectively, these findings argue that iliac screw fixation should remain a favored technique for spinopelvic fixation.

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Thomas J. Buell, James H. Nguyen, Marcus D. Mazur, Jeffrey P. Mullin, Juanita Garces, Davis G. Taylor, Chun-Po Yen, Mark E. Shaffrey, Christopher I. Shaffrey and Justin S. Smith

OBJECTIVE

Fixed sagittal spinal malalignment is a common problem in adult spinal deformity (ASD). Various three-column osteotomy techniques, including the extended pedicle subtraction osteotomy (ePSO), may correct global and regional malalignment in this patient population. In contrast to the number of reports on traditional PSO (Schwab grade 3 osteotomy), there is limited literature on the outcomes of ePSO (Schwab grade 4 osteotomy) in ASD surgery. The objective of this retrospective study was to provide focused investigation of radiographic outcomes and complications of single-level lumbar ePSO for ASD patients with fixed sagittal malalignment.

METHODS

Consecutive ASD patients in whom sagittal malalignment had been treated with single-level lumbar ePSO at the authors’ institution between 2010 and 2015 were analyzed, and those with a minimum 2-year follow-up were included in the study. Radiographic analyses included assessments of segmental lordosis through the ePSO site (sagittal Cobb angle measured from the superior endplate of the vertebra above and inferior endplate of the vertebra below the ePSO), lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic tilt (PT), pelvic incidence and LL mismatch, thoracic kyphosis (TK), and sagittal vertical axis (SVA) on standing long-cassette radiographs. Complications were analyzed for the entire group.

RESULTS

Among 71 potentially eligible patients, 55 (77%) had a minimum 2-year follow-up and were included in the study. Overall, the average postoperative increases in ePSO segmental lordosis and overall LL were 41° ± 14° (range 7°–69°, p < 0.001) and 38° ± 11° (range 9°–58°, p < 0.001), respectively. The average SVA improvement was 13 ± 7 cm (range of correction: −33.6 to 3.4 cm, p < 0.001). These measurements were maintained when comparing early postoperative to last follow-up values, respectively (mean follow-up 52 months, range 26–97 months): ePSO segmental lordosis, 34° vs 33°, p = 0.270; LL, 47.3° vs 46.7°, p = 0.339; and SVA, 4 vs 5 cm, p = 0.330. Rod fracture (RF) at the ePSO site occurred in 18.2% (10/55) of patients, and pseudarthrosis (PA) at the ePSO site was confirmed by CT imaging or during rod revision surgery in 14.5% (8/55) of patients. Accessory supplemental rods across the ePSO site, a more recently employed technique, significantly reduced the occurrence of RF or PA on univariate (p = 0.004) and multivariable (OR 0.062, 95% CI 0.007–0.553, p = 0.013) analyses; this effect approached statistical significance on Kaplan-Meier analysis (p = 0.053, log-rank test). Interbody cage placement at the ePSO site resulted in greater ePSO segmental lordosis correction (45° vs 35°, p = 0.007) without significant change in RF or PA (p = 0.304). Transient and persistent motor deficits occurred in 14.5% (8/55) and 1.8% (1/55) of patients, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Extended PSO is an effective technique to correct fixed sagittal malalignment for ASD. In comparison to traditional PSO techniques, ePSO may allow greater focal correction with comparable complication rates, especially with interbody cage placement at the ePSO site and the use of accessory supplemental rods.

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Nathan R. Selden, Amira Al-Uzri, Stephen L. Huhn, Thomas K. Koch, Darryn M. Sikora, Mina D. Nguyen-Driver, Daniel J. Guillaume, Jeffrey L. Koh, Sakir H. Gultekin, James C. Anderson, Hannes Vogel, Trenna L. Sutcliffe, Yakop Jacobs and Robert D. Steiner

Object

Infantile and late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are invariably fatal lysosomal storage diseases associated with defects in lysosomal enzyme palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1 (PPT-1) or tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1) activity. Previous preclinical studies have demonstrated that human CNS stem cells (HuCNS-SCs) produce both PPT-1 and TPP1 and result in donor cell engraftment and reduced accumulation of storage material in the brain when tested in an NCL mouse model.

Methods

HuCNS-SC transplantation was tested in an open-label dose-escalation Phase I clinical trial as a potential treatment for infantile and late-infantile NCL. Study design included direct neurosurgical transplantation of allogeneic HuCNS-SCs into the cerebral hemispheres and lateral ventricles accompanied by 12 months of immunosuppression.

Results

Six children with either the infantile or late-infantile forms of NCL underwent low- (3 patients) and high- (3 patients) dose transplantation of HuCNS-SCs followed by immunosuppression. The surgery, immunosuppression, and cell transplantation were well tolerated. Adverse events following transplantation were consistent with the underlying disease, and none were directly attributed to the donor cells. Observations regarding efficacy of the intervention were limited by the enrollment criteria requiring that patients be in advanced stages of disease.

Conclusions

This study represents the first-in-human clinical trial involving transplantation of a purified population of human neural stem cells for a neurodegenerative disorder. The feasibility of this approach and absence of transplantation-related serious adverse events support further exploration of HuCNS-SC transplantation as a potential treatment for select subtypes of NCL, and possibly for other neurodegenerative disorders. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00337636 (ClinicalTrials.gov).