Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for

  • Author or Editor: Jae Taek Hong x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Ho Jun Yi, Jae Hoon Sung, Dong Hoon Lee, Seung Ho Yang and Jae Taek Hong

OBJECTIVE

Volume perfusion CT (VPCT) with added CT angiography (CTA)–like reconstruction from VPCT source data (VPCTA) can reveal multiple intracranial parameters. The authors examined the usefulness of VPCTA in terms of reducing the in-hospital time delay for mechanical thrombectomy.

METHODS

A total of 180 patients who underwent mechanical thrombectomy at the authors’ institution between January 2014 and March 2017 were divided into 2 groups: a CTA-based thrombectomy decision group (group 1: CTA) and a VPCTA-based decision group (group 2: VPCTA). Multiple time interval categories (from symptom onset to groin puncture, from hospital arrival to groin puncture, procedure time, from symptom onset to reperfusion, and from hospital arrival to reperfusion) were reviewed. All patients underwent clinical assessment with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score and the modified Rankin Scale, and radiological results were evaluated by the Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction score.

RESULTS

In all of the time interval categories except for procedure time, the VPCTA group showed a significantly shorter in-hospital time delay during the prethrombectomy period than did the CTA group. The 3-month modified Rankin Scale score was significantly lower in the VPCTA group (2.8) compared with the CTA group (3.5) (p = 0.003). However, there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups in the other clinical and radiological outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS

Compared with CTA, VPCTA significantly reduced the in-hospital time delay during the prethrombectomy period.

Restricted access

Ho Jun Yi, Jae Hoon Sung, Dong Hoon Lee, Seung Ho Yang and Jae Taek Hong

OBJECTIVE

Volume perfusion CT (VPCT) with added CT angiography (CTA)–like reconstruction from VPCT source data (VPCTA) can reveal multiple intracranial parameters. The authors examined the usefulness of VPCTA in terms of reducing the in-hospital time delay for mechanical thrombectomy.

METHODS

A total of 180 patients who underwent mechanical thrombectomy at the authors’ institution between January 2014 and March 2017 were divided into 2 groups: a CTA-based thrombectomy decision group (group 1: CTA) and a VPCTA-based decision group (group 2: VPCTA). Multiple time interval categories (from symptom onset to groin puncture, from hospital arrival to groin puncture, procedure time, from symptom onset to reperfusion, and from hospital arrival to reperfusion) were reviewed. All patients underwent clinical assessment with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score and the modified Rankin Scale, and radiological results were evaluated by the Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction score.

RESULTS

In all of the time interval categories except for procedure time, the VPCTA group showed a significantly shorter in-hospital time delay during the prethrombectomy period than did the CTA group. The 3-month modified Rankin Scale score was significantly lower in the VPCTA group (2.8) compared with the CTA group (3.5) (p = 0.003). However, there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups in the other clinical and radiological outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS

Compared with CTA, VPCTA significantly reduced the in-hospital time delay during the prethrombectomy period.

Full access

Jung Jae Park, Hong Joo Moon, Jin Hyun Park, Taek Hyun Kwon, Youn-Kwan Park and Joo Han Kim

OBJECT

To determine the role played by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in the interactions between macrophages and intervertebral disc (IVD) cells, it was hypothesized that MAPK inhibition would modulate the production of the proinflammatory cytokines associated with inflammatory reaction in IVD cells.

METHODS

Human annulus fibrosus (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells were cocultured with phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated macrophage-like THP-1 cells, with and without SB202190 (a p38-α and -β inhibitor), SP600125 (a c-Jun N-terminal kinase [JNK] inhibitor), and PD98059 (an extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK] 1/2 inhibitor). The cytokines in conditioned media from cocultured and macrophage-exposed (nemotic) cells were assayed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs).

RESULTS

Interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 were secreted in greater quantities by the cocultured cells compared with naive IVD cells and macrophages (MΦ) cultured alone. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF)- α and IL-6 levels produced by the NP cells cocultured with MΦs (NP-MΦ) were significantly lower than those produced by AF cells cocultured with MΦs (AF-MΦ). SB202190 dose-dependently suppressed IL-6 secretion by AF-MΦ and NP-MΦ cocultures, and 10 μM SB202190 significantly decreased IL-6 and IL-8 production in nemotic AF and NP pellets. SP600125 at 10 μM significantly suppressed the production of TNF α IL-6. and IL-8 in AF-MΦ and NP-MΦ cocultures and significantly suppressed IL-1β production in the NP-MΦ coculture. Administration of 10 μM PD98059 significantly decreased IL-6 levels in the AF-MΦ coculture, and decreased the levels of TNF α and IL-8 in both the AF-MΦ and NP-MΦ cocultures.

CONCLUSIONS

The present study shows that inhibitors of p38 MAPK effectively controlled IL-6 production during inflammatory reactions and that JNK and ERK1/2 inhibitors successfully suppressed the production of major proinflammatory cytokines during interactions between macrophages and IVD cells. Therefore, selective blockade of these signals may serve as a therapeutic approach to symptomatic IVD degeneration.

Restricted access

Jae Taek Hong, Tae Hyung Kim, Il Sup Kim, Seung Ho Yang, Jae Hoon Sung, Byung Chul Son and Sang Won Lee

Object

The aim of this study was to analyze the exact location of the internal carotid artery (ICA) relative to the C-1 lateral mass and describe the effect of age on the tortuosity of the ICA.

Methods

The authors analyzed 641 patients who had undergone CT angiography to evaluate the location of the ICA in relation to the C-1 lateral mass. Each patient was assigned to 1 of 3 age groups (< 41 years, 41–60 years, and > 60 years of age). The degree of lateral positioning of the ICA was classified into 4 groups: Group 1 (lateral to the C-1 lateral mass), Group 2 (lateral half of the lateral mass), Group 3 (medial half of the lateral mass), or Group 4 (medial to the lateral mass). The anteroposterior relationship of the ICA was classified into Group A (posterior to the anterior tubercle) or Group B (anterior to the anterior tubercle). Distances from the ICA to the midline, anterior tubercle, and anterior cortex of the lateral mass were measured. Distances between the lateral margin of the lateral mass and the longus capitis muscle were also evaluated.

Results

The prevalence of the ICA located in front of the lateral mass (Groups 2 and 3) was 47.4% overall. The position of the ICA changes with age due to vessel tortuosity. Only 18.3% of patients in the youngest age group (< 41 years of age) had an ICA in front of the lateral mass (Group 2 or 3 area). However, this percentage increased in the older 2 groups (43.5% in the 41–60 year old group, and 57% in the > 60-year-old age group). The mean distance from the midline to the ICA was 22.6 mm, and the mean distance from the ICA to the C-1 anterior tubercle and the ventral cortex of the lateral mass was 4.7 and 4.5 mm, respectively. Moreover, the ICA is more prone to injury during bicortical C-1 screw placement when the longus capitis muscle is hypotrophic and does not cover the entire ventral surface of the lateral mass.

Conclusions

Elderly patients have a higher incidence of a medially located ICA that may contribute to the risk of injury to the ICA during bicortical C-1 screw or C1–2 transarticular screw placement. Although the small number of reported cases of ICA injury does not allow for determination of a direct relationship with specific anatomical characteristics, the presence of unfavorable anatomy does warrant serious consideration during evaluation for C-1 screw placement in elderly patients.

Restricted access

Jae Taek Hong, Sang Won Lee, Byung Chul Son, Jae Hoon Sung, Il Sub Kim and Chun Kun Park

✓ Atlantoaxial fixation in which C1–2 screw–rod fixation is performed is a relatively new method. Because reports about this technique are rather scant, little is known about its associated complications. In this report the authors introduce hypoglossal nerve palsy as a complication of this novel posterior atlantoaxial stabilization method.

A 67-year-old man underwent a C1–2 screw–rod fixation for persistent neck pain resulting from a Type 2 odontoid fracture that involved disruption of the transverse atlantal ligament. Posterior instrumentation in which a C-1 lateral mass screw and C-2 pedicle screw were placed was performed. Postoperatively, the patient suffered dysphagia with deviation of the tongue to the left side. At the 4-month follow-up examination, bone fusion was noted on plain x-ray studies of the cervical spine. His hypoglossal nerve palsy resolved completely 2 months postoperatively.

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of hypoglossal nerve palsy following C1–2 screw–rod fixation. The hypoglossal nerve is one of the structures that can be damaged during C-1 lateral mass screw placement.

Restricted access

Jae Taek Hong, Sang Won Lee, Byung Chul Son, Jae Hoon Sung, Seung Ho Yang, Il Sub Kim and Chun Kun Park

Object

The current study evaluates the incidence of anatomical variations of the V3 segment of the vertebral artery (VA) and the posterior arch of the atlas (C-1). Failure to appreciate these types of anatomical variations can cause catastrophic injury to the VA during posterior approaches to the upper cervical spine.

Methods

In the present study, the authors analyzed the records of 1013 Korean patients who underwent computed tomography (CT) angiography to evaluate the incidence of anomalous variations in the third segment of the VA and to determine the incidence and morphometric characteristics of any detected posterior ponticuli. The authors also hoped to determine any specific imaging features that might indicate a VA anomaly around the craniovertebral junction.

Results

The mean age of the patients was ~ 55.7 years and the prevalence of a posterior ponticulus was 15.6%. The incidence rate of a posterior ponticulus in the male population was 19.3%, whereas in the female population it was 12.8%. The incomplete type of posterior ponticulus was more common than the complete type. The mean age of the patients with an incomplete posterior ponticulus (55.7 years) was significantly younger (p = 0.018) than the mean age of patients with a complete posterior ponticulus (57.6 years). The incidence rate of a persistent first inter-segmental artery was 4.7% and the incidence rate of a fenestrated VA was 0.6%. The area of the C-1 transverse foramen on the abnormal side was significantly smaller than that of the contralateral normal side.

Conclusions

The shape of the C-1 posterior arch and the third segment of the VA are heterogeneous. Therefore, preoperative radiological studies should be performed to identify any anatomical variations. Using preoperative 3D CT angiography, we can precisely identify an anomalous VA and significantly reduce the risk of VA injury.

Restricted access

Hyoung-Sub Kim, Jong Beom Lee, Jong Hyeok Park, Ho Jin Lee, Jung Jae Lee, Shumayou Dutta, Il Sup Kim and Jae Taek Hong

OBJECTIVE

Little is known about the risk factors for postoperative subaxial cervical kyphosis following craniovertebral junction (CVJ) fixation. The object of this study was to evaluate postoperative changes in cervical alignment and to identify the risk factors for postoperative kyphotic change in the subaxial cervical spine after CVJ fixation.

METHODS

One hundred fifteen patients were retrospectively analyzed for postoperative subaxial kyphosis after CVJ fixation. Relations between subaxial kyphosis and radiological risk factors, including segmental angles and ranges of motion (ROMs) at C0–1, C1–2, and C2–7, and clinical factors, such as age, sex, etiology, occipital fixation, extensor muscle resection at C2, additional C1–2 posterior wiring, and subaxial laminoplasty, were investigated. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify the risk factors for postoperative kyphotic changes in the subaxial cervical spine.

RESULTS

The C2–7 angle change was more than −10° in 30 (26.1%) of the 115 patients. Risk factor analysis showed CVJ fixation combined with subaxial laminoplasty (OR 9.336, 95% CI 1.484–58.734, p = 0.017) and a small ROM at the C0–1 segment (OR 0.836, 95% CI 0.757–0.923, p < 0.01) were related to postoperative subaxial kyphotic change. On the other hand, age, sex, resection of the C2 extensor muscle, rheumatoid arthritis, additional C1–2 posterior wiring, and postoperative segmental angles were not risk factors for postoperative subaxial kyphosis

CONCLUSIONS

Subaxial alignment change is not uncommon after CVJ fixation. Muscle detachment at the C2 spinous process was not a risk factor of kyphotic change. The study findings suggest that a small ROM at the C0–1 segment with or without occipital fixation and combined subaxial laminoplasty are risk factors for subaxial kyphotic change.

Full access

Chang-Hyun Lee, Chun Kee Chung, Jee-Soo Jang, Sung-Min Kim, Dong-Kyu Chin, Jung-Kil Lee, Seung Hwan Yoon, Jae Taek Hong, Yoon Ha, Chi Heon Kim and Seung-Jae Hyun

OBJECTIVE

As life expectancy continues to increase, primary degenerative sagittal imbalance (PDSI) is diagnosed in an increasing number of elderly people. Although corrective surgery for this sagittal deformity is becoming more popular, the effectiveness of the procedure remains unclear. The authors aimed to collate the available evidence on the effectiveness and complications of deformity-correction surgery in patients with PDSI.

METHODS

The authors carried out a meta-analysis of clinical studies regarding deformity correction in patients with PDSI. The studies were identified through searches of the PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases. Surgery outcomes were evaluated and overall treatment effectiveness was assessed in terms of the minimum clinically important difference (MCID) in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) values and pain levels according to visual analog scale (VAS) scores and in terms of restoration of spinopelvic parameters to within a normal range. Data are expressed as mean differences with 95% CIs.

RESULTS

Ten studies comprising 327 patients were included. The VAS and ODI values improved after deformity-correction surgery. The smallest treatment effect exceeded the MCID for VAS values (4.15 [95% CI 3.48–4.82]) but not for ODI values (18.11 [95% CI 10.99–25.23]). At the final follow-up visit, the mean lumbar lordosis angle (−38.60° [95% CI −44.19° to −33.01°]), thoracic kyphosis angle (31.10° [95% CI 24.67°–37.53°]), C-7 sagittal vertical axis (65.00 mm [95% CI 35.27–94.72 mm]), and pelvic tilt angle (30.82° [95% CI 24.41°–37.23°]) remained outside their normal ranges. Meta-regression analyses revealed a significant effect of ODI change in relation to lumbar lordosis change (p = 0.004). After a mean of 2 years after deformity correction, the mean lumbar lordosis angle and C-7 sagittal vertical axis decreased by 5.82° and 38.91 mm, respectively, and the mean thoracic kyphosis angle increased by 4.7°. The incidences of proximal junctional kyphosis and pseudarthrosis were 23.7% and 12.8%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Deformity correction substantially relieves back pain for about 2 years in adult patients with PDSI. Sufficient surgical restoration of lumbar lordosis can lead to substantial improvement in patient disability and reduced decompensation. Deformity correction represents a viable therapeutic option for patients with PDSI, but further technical advancements are necessary to achieve sufficient lumbar lordosis and reduce complication rates.