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Young-Hoon Kim, Young Jin Lee, Jung Ho Han, Soyeon Ahn, Jaebong Lee, Jae Hyoung Kim, Byung Se Choi, Jae Seung Bang, Chae-Yong Kim, Gyojun Hwang, O-Ki Kwon, and Chang Wan Oh

OBJECT

The authors aimed to assess whether the prevalence of intracranial aneurysms in patients with intracranial meningiomas was higher than that in a healthy population.

METHODS

The authors performed a hospital-based case-control study of 300 patients with newly diagnosed intracranial meningiomas and 900 age- and sex-matched controls without a history of brain tumors to evaluate any associations between intracranial aneurysms and intracranial meningiomas. Unconditional multivariate logistic regression models were used for case-control comparisons.

RESULTS

Intracranial aneurysms were identified in 23 patients (7.7%) and 24 controls (2.7%; p < 0.001). There was a significant association between intracranial aneurysms and intracranial meningiomas (OR 2.913, 95% CI 1.613–5.261) and hypertension (OR 1.905, 95% CI 1.053–3.446). In a subgroup analysis of the patients with newly diagnosed intracranial meningiomas, there was a significant association between intracranial aneurysms and hypertension (OR 2.876, 95% CI 1.125–7.352) and tumor volume (OR 1.012, 95% CI 1.001–1.024). These patients were also more likely than controls to have other intracranial vascular diseases (p < 0.001), such as isolated occlusion of the intracranial vessels, excluding intracranial aneurysms.

CONCLUSIONS

The prevalence of intracranial aneurysms was higher in patients with intracranial meningiomas. Hypertension and tumor volume appear to be associated with the formation of intracranial aneurysms in these patients.

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Hyoung-Sub Kim, Jong Beom Lee, Jong Hyeok Park, Ho Jin Lee, Jung Jae Lee, Shumayou Dutta, Il Sup Kim, and Jae Taek Hong

OBJECTIVE

Little is known about the risk factors for postoperative subaxial cervical kyphosis following craniovertebral junction (CVJ) fixation. The object of this study was to evaluate postoperative changes in cervical alignment and to identify the risk factors for postoperative kyphotic change in the subaxial cervical spine after CVJ fixation.

METHODS

One hundred fifteen patients were retrospectively analyzed for postoperative subaxial kyphosis after CVJ fixation. Relations between subaxial kyphosis and radiological risk factors, including segmental angles and ranges of motion (ROMs) at C0–1, C1–2, and C2–7, and clinical factors, such as age, sex, etiology, occipital fixation, extensor muscle resection at C2, additional C1–2 posterior wiring, and subaxial laminoplasty, were investigated. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify the risk factors for postoperative kyphotic changes in the subaxial cervical spine.

RESULTS

The C2–7 angle change was more than −10° in 30 (26.1%) of the 115 patients. Risk factor analysis showed CVJ fixation combined with subaxial laminoplasty (OR 9.336, 95% CI 1.484–58.734, p = 0.017) and a small ROM at the C0–1 segment (OR 0.836, 95% CI 0.757–0.923, p < 0.01) were related to postoperative subaxial kyphotic change. On the other hand, age, sex, resection of the C2 extensor muscle, rheumatoid arthritis, additional C1–2 posterior wiring, and postoperative segmental angles were not risk factors for postoperative subaxial kyphosis

CONCLUSIONS

Subaxial alignment change is not uncommon after CVJ fixation. Muscle detachment at the C2 spinous process was not a risk factor of kyphotic change. The study findings suggest that a small ROM at the C0–1 segment with or without occipital fixation and combined subaxial laminoplasty are risk factors for subaxial kyphotic change.

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Dong Hyun Yoo, Chul-Ho Sohn, Young Dae Cho, Hyun-Seung Kang, Chul-Kee Park, Jin Wook Kim, and Jae Hyoung Kim

OBJECTIVE

Superselective pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (ss-pCASL) is an MRI technique in which individual vessels are labeled to trace their perfusion territories. In this study, the authors assessed its merit in defining feeding vessels and gauging preoperative embolization feasibility for patients with meningioma, using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as the reference method.

METHODS

Thirty-one consecutive patients with meningiomas were prospectively recruited, each undergoing DSA (and embolization, if feasible) before resection. All ss-pCASL imaging studies were performed 1 day prior to DSA. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed ss-pCASL images, rating the contribution of each labeled vessel to tumor blood supply as none, minor, or major. Two neuroradiologists also gauged the feasibility of embolization in each patient, based on ss-pCASL images. Interobserver and intermodality agreement were determined using Cohen’s kappa statistic. The diagnostic performance of ss-pCASL was assessed in terms of discerning tumor blood supply and the potential for embolization.

RESULTS

Interobserver agreement in the rating of blood supply by ss-pCASL was very good (κ = 0.817, 95% CI 0.771–0.863), and intermodality agreement (consensus ss-pCASL readings vs DSA findings) was good (κ = 0.688, 95% CI 0.632–0.744). In delineating tumor blood supply, ss-pCASL showed high sensitivity (87.1%) and specificity (87.2%). The positive and negative predictive values for embolization feasibility were 85.2% and 100%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

In patients with meningiomas, feeding vessels are reliably predicted by ss-pCASL. This noninvasive approach, involving no iodinated contrast or radiation exposure, is particularly beneficial if there are no prospects of embolization.