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Jae Hyo Park, Seung-Yeob Yang, You-Nam Chung, Jeong Eun Kim, Seung-Ki Kim, Dae Hee Han, and Byung-Kyu Cho

✓The authors describe a modified technique of encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis (EDAS) with bifrontal encephalogaleoperiosteal synangiosis (EGPS) and present the preliminary results of the procedure. Between January 2004 and June 2005 the authors performed modified EDAS with bifrontal EGPS in 17 patients with moyamoya disease. Surgical results were evaluated in terms of clinical outcomes, changes visible on neuroimages, extent of revascularization noted on angiograms, and hemodynamic changes demonstrated on single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans. The follow-up period ranged from 6 to 21 months (mean 11.5 months). The overall clinical outcomes were excellent or good in 15 patients (88.2%) and poor in two (11.8%). The overall morbidity rate was 5.9% (one of 17 patients). Based on changes in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) territories after surgery, as shown on SPECT scans following administration of acetazolamide, 14 patients (82.4%) exhibited an improved vascular reserve capacity in both the ACA and MCA territories. It is the authors' opinion that wide covering of the cortex is necessary for sufficient revascularization. In the present study they demonstrate that modified EDAS with bifrontal EGPS is a safe and efficient surgical approach that covers not only the MCA territory but also the ACA territory.

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Jae Hyo Park, Park In Sung, Dae Hee Han, Seong Hyun Kim, Chang Wan Oh, Jeong-Eun Kim, Hyun Jib Kim, Moon Hee Han, and O-Ki Kwon

Object

Because of its thin wall, an aneurysm arising from the posterior wall of the internal carotid artery (ICA), the so-called blood blister–like aneurysm (BBA), is difficult to manage surgically and is often associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. The authors treated these aneurysms endovascularly. In this paper, they present angiographic and clinical results obtained in patients with ICA BBAs treated endovascularly.

Methods

In seven patients with ICA BBAs who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage, a total number of 12 endovascular treatments were performed, including seven endosaccular coil embolizations (four conventional, two stent-assisted and one balloon-assisted procedure) in four patients and five endovascular ICA trapping procedures in five patients. Repeated endovascular treatments were undertaken in four patients. In two patients, the endovascular treatment was performed after failure of surgical treatment (one case of rebleeding after clip placement and one aneurysmal regrowth after wrapping). A balloon occlusion test (BOT) was performed in all patients prior to ICA trapping.

All four patients treated by endosaccular coil embolization showed aneurysmal regrowth. Neither stents nor balloons helpfully prevented aneurysmal regrowth. Of these four patients, two experienced rebleeding. These two patients remained vegetative at the last follow-up examination. After the BOT, ICA trapping was performed with coils and balloons without complication in five patients; excellent outcomes were achieved in all cases but one in which the patient had been in poor neurological condition due to rebleeding after surgical clip therapy.

Conclusions

All ICA BBAs that were treated by endosaccular coil embolization exhibited regrowth of the aneurysm. Some of the lesions rebled. The majority of patients who underwent ICA trapping experienced excellent outcomes. Based on the authors' experiences, they suggest that ICA trapping including the lesion segment should be considered as a first option for definitive treatment if a BOT reveals satisfactory results. Regarding trapping methods, endovascular treatment may be preferred because of its convenience and safety.

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Min A. Yoon, Eunhee Kim, Bae-Ju Kwon, Jeong Eun Kim, Hyun-Seung Kang, Jae Hyo Park, Chul-Ho Sohn, Ji-Hoon Kim, and Dong Hoon Lee

Object

Reinforcement of aneurysms with additional wrapping is an alternative procedure if the aneurysm cannot be completely clipped. Wrapping with muslin (cotton gauze) rarely incites foreign body inflammatory reactions. In this study, the authors describe the clinical and radiological features of muslinomas or muslin-induced foreign body reactions that can develop after treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

Methods

Over a 3-year period, 5 patients with muslinomas underwent treatment at the authors' institution. All patients underwent aneursym clipping and wrapping, and were subsequently readmitted with acute or subacute neurological symptoms. Clinical and imaging features on diffusion weighted MR images and cerebral angiography images were retrospectively reviewed. The patients' clinical course and follow-up imaging studies were also evaluated.

Results

In all 5 cases, muslinomas were seen as rim-enhancing inflammatory masses around the clipped aneurysms with perilesional edema visible on MR images at the time of clinical deterioration. The MR images also demonstrated adhesive arachnoiditis with a sterile intracranial abscess in 3 patients, optic neuropathy in 2, parent artery narrowing in 2, and a resultant acute ischemic infarction in 1 patient. Follow-up imaging revealed resolution of both the perilesional edema and adhesive arachnoiditis but no significant changes in the muslinomas. All patients underwent conservative management and fully recovered, but during the follow-up period, 2 patients experienced clinical and radiological relapses.

Conclusions

When a patient with a history of wrapping of an aneurysm presents with acute neurological symptoms and an enhancing intracranial mass in the region of the surgical site on MR imaging, a muslin-induced foreign body inflammatory reaction should be considered in the differential diagnosis, and careful clinical and radiological follow-up is advised.

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Jae Hyo Park, Jeong Eun Kim, Seung Hun Sheen, Cheol Kyu Jung, Bae Ju Kwon, O-Ki Kwon, Chang Wan Oh, Moon Hee Han, and Dae Hee Han

Object

Experience with intraarterial abciximab for the treatment of thromboembolism during endovascular coil embolization is limited. The authors report the outcome of intraarterial abciximab use, with an emphasis on fatal hemorrhagic complications.

Methods

Between March 2003 and May 2006, the authors treated 606 aneurysms by using endovascular coil embolization, and in 32 (5.3%) of these aneurysms (31 patients) an intraarterial thrombus developed. Sixteen of these aneurysms were ruptured and the other 16 were unruptured. Arterial thrombi were totally occlusive in 3 and partially occlusive in the remaining 29 cases. Intraarterial abciximab was administered at a concentration of 0.2 mg/ml as a bolus of 4–15 mg over a period of 15–30 minutes.

Results

Complete thrombolysis was achieved in 17 (53%) and partial thrombolysis in 15 (47%) of 32 lesions. Twenty-eight patients (90.3%) were asymptomatic after abciximab thrombolysis, but 3 had postprocedural rebleeding that occurred after abciximab treatment; all of these patients had recently experienced an aneurysm rupture. Of these patients, 1 displayed severe thrombocytopenia and the other 2 showed a > 25% reduction in platelet count after abciximab treatment.

Conclusions

Intraarterial abciximab is effective for the treatment of thromboembolic complications that occur during intracranial aneurysm coil insertion. Nevertheless, attention should be paid to prevent potentially fatal complications such as thrombocytopenia and hemorrhage, especially in patients with a ruptured aneurysm.