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  • Author or Editor: Irina Alafuzoff x
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Sami Abu Hamdeh, Johan Virhammar, Dag Sehlin, Irina Alafuzoff, Kristina Giuliana Cesarini and Niklas Marklund

OBJECTIVE

The authors conducted a study to test if the cortical brain tissue levels of soluble amyloid beta (Aβ) reflect the propensity of cortical Aβ aggregate formation and may be an additional factor predicting surgical outcome following idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) treatment.

METHODS

Highly selective ELISAs (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) were used to quantify soluble Aβ40, Aβ42, and neurotoxic Aβ oligomers/protofibrils, associated with Aβ aggregation, in cortical biopsy samples obtained in patients with iNPH (n = 20), sampled during ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt surgery. Patients underwent pre- and postoperative (3-month) clinical assessment with a modified iNPH scale. The preoperative CSF biomarkers and the levels of soluble and insoluble Aβ species in cortical biopsy samples were analyzed for their association with a favorable outcome following the VP shunt procedure, defined as a ≥ 5-point increase in the iNPH scale.

RESULTS

The brain tissue levels of Aβ42 were negatively correlated with CSF Aβ42 (Spearman’s r = −0.53, p < 0.05). The Aβ40, Aβ42, and Aβ oligomer/protofibril levels in cortical biopsy samples were higher in patients with insoluble cortical Aβ aggregates (p < 0.05). The preoperative CSF Aβ42 levels were similar in patients responding (n = 11) and not responding (n = 9) to VP shunt treatment at 3 months postsurgery. In contrast, the presence of cortical Aβ aggregates and high brain tissue Aβ42 levels were associated with a poor outcome following VP shunt treatment (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Brain tissue measurements of soluble Aβ species are feasible. Since high Aβ42 levels in cortical biopsy samples obtained in patients with iNPH indicated a poor surgical outcome, tissue levels of Aβ species may be associated with the clinical response to shunt treatment.

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Petros N. Karamanakos, Juha E. Jaaskelainen, Irina Alafuzoff, Elina Pirinen, Ritva Vanninen, Sanna Silvennoinen, Ulla Sankilampi and Arto Immonen

Giant cell tumors (GCTs) of the bone are rare, usually benign but locally aggressive neoplasms that primarily occur in the epiphyses of long bones. They seldom develop in the cranium; when they do, they involve principally the sphenoid and temporal bones. These tumors usually affect young adults, and few reports in children have been published. Primary malignant GCTs of the skull are even more uncommon. The 3 published cases all involved adults over 40 years of age. Herein, the authors present a case of a highly aggressive primary malignant GCT of the posterior fossa in a 5-week old preterm infant. One month after the gross-total resection of the tumor found in the bone, the infant's condition rapidly deteriorated and she died. Magnetic resonance imaging and postmortem examination revealed a tumor larger than it had been before the operation, with expansion toward the brain. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the youngest patient reported with a primary malignant GCT of the skull, and actually the first case in a pediatric patient. In addition, the extremely high growth rate of the tumor in the postoperative period renders this case the most aggressive primary malignant GCT of the cranium described so far.

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Maria Zetterling, Kenney R Roodakker, Shala Ghaderi Berntsson, Per-Henrik Edqvist, Francesco Latini, Anne-Marie Landtblom, Fredrik Pontén, Irina Alafuzoff, Elna-Marie Larsson and Anja Smits

OBJECTIVE

Magnetic resonance imaging tends to underestimate the extent of diffuse low-grade gliomas (DLGGs). With the aim of studying the presence of tumor cells outside the radiological border, the authors developed a method of correlating MRI findings with histological data in patients with suspected DLGGs in whom en bloc resections were performed.

METHODS

Five patients with suspected DLGG suitable for en bloc resection were recruited from an ongoing prospective study. Sections of the entire tumor were immunostained with antibodies against mutated IDH1 protein (IDH1-R132H). Magnetic resonance images were coregistered with corresponding IDH1 images. The growth pattern of tumor cells in white and gray matter was assessed in comparison with signal changes on corresponding MRI slices.

RESULTS

Neuropathological assessment revealed DLGG in 4 patients and progression to WHO Grade III glioma in 1 patient. The tumor core consisted of a high density of IDH1-R132H–positive tumor cells and was located in both gray and white matter. Tumor cells infiltrated along the peripheral fibers of the white matter tracts. In all cases, tumor cells were found outside the radiological tumor border delineated on T2-FLAIR MRI sequences.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors present a new method for the coregistration of histological and radiological characteristics of en bloc–removed infiltrative brain tumors that discloses tumor invasion at the radiological tumor borders. This technique can be applied to evaluate the sensitivity of alternative imaging methods to detect scattered tumor cells at tumor borders. Accurate methods for detection of infiltrative tumor cells will improve the possibility of performing radical tumor resection. In future studies, the method could also be used for in vivo studies of tumor invasion.