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Lorenzo Rinaldo, Desmond Brown, Giuseppe Lanzino and Ian F. Parney

OBJECTIVE

The clinical course of high-grade central nervous system gliomas is occasionally complicated by hydrocephalus. The risks of shunt placement and clinical outcome following CSF diversion in this population are not well defined.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of patients with pathologically confirmed WHO grade III or IV gliomas with shunt-treated hydrocephalus at their institution. Outcomes of patients in this cohort were compared with those of patients who underwent shunt treatment for normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Hospital-reported outcomes in a national database for malignant primary brain tumor patients undergoing a ventricular shunt procedure were also reviewed.

RESULTS

Forty-one patients undergoing CSF shunting between 2001 and 2016 at the authors’ institution were identified. Noncommunicating and communicating hydrocephalus occurred at similar rates (51.2% vs 48.8%). Symptomatic improvement after shunting was observed in 75.0% of patients. A major complication occurred in 17.1% of cases, with 2 patients suffering an intracranial hemorrhage. Prior administration of bevacizumab was significantly associated with the incidence of hemorrhage (p = 0.026). Three patients (7.3%) died during admission, and 8 (19.5%) died within 30 days of shunt placement. The presence of ependymal or leptomeningeal enhancement was more common in patients who died within 30 days (75.0% vs 11.1%, p = 0.001). Six patients (18.1%) required readmission to the hospital within 30 days of discharge. Revision surgery was necessary in 7 patients (17.1%). The median time from shunt placement to death was 150.5 days. In comparison with patients with NPH, shunt-treated high-grade glioma patients had increased in-hospital (7.3% vs 0.5%, p = 0.008) and 30-day (19.5% vs 0.8%, p < 0.001) mortality but no difference in the incidence of revision surgery (17.1% vs 17.5%, p = 0.947). Similarly, in the national Vizient Clinical Database Resource Manager, shunt-treated patients with malignant primary brain tumors had an increased length of stay (6.9 vs 3.5 days, p < 0.001), direct cost of admission ($15,755.80 vs $9871.50, p < 0.001), and 30-day readmission rates (20.6% vs 2.4%, p < 0.001) compared with patients without brain tumors who received a shunt for NPH.

CONCLUSIONS

Shunting can be an effective treatment for the symptoms of hydrocephalus in patients with high-grade gliomas. However, the authors’ results suggest that this procedure carries a significant risk of complications in this patient population.

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Ian F. Parney and David E. Steinke

U The authors present a case of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis (HITT) that occurred after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and they review the relevant literature. An immune-mediated syndrome, HITT is characterized by moderate thrombocytopenia and paradoxical vascular thromboses. Although it has been estimated in prospective studies that HITT occurs in between 1 and 3% of patients receiving heparin, it is underrecognized in the neurosurgical literature. In the present case, a 49-year-old woman underwent clipping of a right posterior communicating artery aneurysm after suffering a Hunt and Hess Grade III SAH. She had an uncomplicated postoperative course with good clip positioning and no vasospasm observed on a cerebral angiogram obtained on Day 7.

On Day 23, the patient developed a right hemiparesis and experienced a grand mal seizure. A head computerized tomography scan revealed a hemorrhagic infarct in the left middle cerebral artery distribution. Repeated cerebral angiograms did not show vasospasm. She was thrombocytopenic (platelet count as low as 46 × 109/L on Day 28 compared with 213 × 109/L on Day 1) and had been receiving heparin flushes to maintain intravenous catheter patency. An assay for HITT-associated antibodies was positive. The heparin flushes were discontinued and the platelet count recovered (121 × 109/L). She improved neurologically, but was left with a significant right hemiparesis at discharge. This patient had assay-proven heparin-induced thrombocytopenia despite minimal exposure to heparin. Because there was no evidence of vasospasm or other factors to account for her delayed hemorrhagic infarction, an HITT-related disorder seemed most likely. Despite a large body of literature describing HITT in nonneurosurgical patients, only three previous neurosurgical cases have been published. This case report may serve to heighten awareness of this disorder.

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Deborah O. Heros and Roberto C. Heros

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Grant W. Mallory, Shanna Fang, Caterina Giannini, Jamie J. Van Gompel and Ian F. Parney

Object

Carcinoid tumors are rare and have generally been regarded as indolent neoplasms. Systemic disease is often incurable; however, patients may live years with this disease. Furthermore, metastatic brain lesions are extremely uncommon. As such, few series have examined outcomes and prognostic factors in those with brain involvement.

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent primary treatment at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, for metastatic carcinoid tumors to the brain between 1986 and 2011. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier statistics. Cox proportional hazards were used to determine predictors of survival.

Results

Fifteen patients underwent primary treatment for metastatic carcinoid tumors to the brain between 1986 and 2011. Their mean age was 58 ± 12 years. Eighty percent (n = 12) of patients underwent surgery, whereas 2 received stereotactic radiosurgery and 1 had whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) as the primary treatment. The median follow-up duration was 19 months (maximum 124 months). Systemic disease progression occurred in 73% and was the leading cause of death in known cases, while intracranial disease recurred in 40%. The median PFS and OS were 21 and 19 months, respectively. The use of adjuvant WBRT correlated with improved PFS (HR 0.15, CI 0.0074–0.95, p = 0.044). Those who underwent surgery as primary modalities trended toward longer progression-free intervals (p = 0.095), although this did not reach significance.

Conclusions

Metastatic carcinoid disease to the brain appears to have a worse prognosis than that of other extracranial metastases. Although there was a trend toward a survival advantage in patients who underwent surgery and WBRT, further study is needed to establish definitive treatment recommendations.

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Ian F. Parney, James S. Waldron and Andrew T. Parsa

Object

To date, glioma immunotherapy has been focused mostly on stimulating antitumor peripheral lymphocyte responses; however, some data suggest that microglia and/or macrophages (not lymphocytes) are the predominant inflammatory cells infiltrating gliomas. To study this hypothesis further, the authors analyzed inflammatory cell infiltrates in fresh human malignant glioma specimens and primary cultures.

Methods

Single-cell suspensions from fresh operative malignant glioma specimens, obtained by stereotactic localization, were analyzed for CD11b and CD45 by using flow cytometry. A comparison was made with peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In a subset of patients, a more detailed flow cytometry analysis of Class I and II major histocompatibility complex, B7-1, B7-2, CD11c, and CD14 expression was performed. Macrophage-like cells in primary glioma cultures were similarly assessed.

Results

Operative samples were obtained from 9 newly diagnosed malignant gliomas. The mean percent of CD45+/CD11b cells (lymphocytes) was 2.48% (range 0.65–5.50%); CD45dim/CD11b+ cells (microglia), 1.65% (range 0.37–3.92%); and CD45bright/CD11b+ (monocytes/macrophages), 6.25% (range 1.56–15.3%). More detailed fluorescence-activated cell sorting suggested that macrophage-like cells expressed Class I and II major histocompatibility complex, B7-2, and CD11c but not CD14 or B7-1. Primary human glioma cultures contained significant numbers of macrophage-like (CD45bright/CD11b+) cells, but these cells were lost with successive passages. These cells maintained the immunomarker profiles of macrophage-like cells from fresh specimens only if they were cultured in serum-free media.

Conclusions

The CD45+/CD11b+ cells are the predominant inflammatory cell infiltrating human gliomas. Of this type, the CD45bright/CD11b+ cells, a phenotype compatible with circulating macrophages in rodent models, and not microglia, are the most common. Their immunomarker profile is compatible with an immature antigen-presenting cell. They are present in primary glioma cultures but are lost in successive passages. Their role is enigmatic, and they may prove an important target for future glioma immunotherapy studies.

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Christopher S. Graffeo, Michael J. Link, Scott L. Stafford, Ian F. Parney, Robert L. Foote and Bruce E. Pollock

OBJECTIVE

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an accepted treatment option for patients with benign parasellar tumors. Here, the authors’ objective was to determine the risk of developing new or progressive internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis or occlusion after single-fraction SRS for cavernous sinus meningioma (CSM) or growth hormone–secreting pituitary adenoma (GHPA).

METHODS

The authors queried their prospectively maintained registry for patients treated with single-fraction SRS for CSM or GHPA in the period from 1990 to 2015. Study criteria included no prior irradiation and ≥ 12 months of post-SRS radiological follow-up. Pre-SRS grading of ICA involvement was applied according to the 1993 classification schemes of Hirsch for CSM or Knosp for GHPA.

RESULTS

The authors conducted a retrospective review of 283 patients, 155 with CSMs and 128 with GHPAs. Ninety-three (60%) CSMs were Hirsch category 2 and 3 tumors; 97 (76%) GHPAs were Knosp grade 2–4 tumors. Median follow-up after SRS was 6.6 years (IQR 1–24.9 years). No GHPA or category 1 CSM developed ICA stenosis or occlusion. Three (5.2%) patients with category 2 CSMs had asymptomatic ICA stenosis (n = 2) or occlusion (n = 1); 1 (1.1%) category 2 CSM patient had transient ischemic symptoms. Five (14.3%) category 3 CSMs progressed to ICA occlusion (4 asymptomatic, 1 symptomatic). The median time to stenosis/occlusion was 4.8 years (IQR 1.8–7.6). Five- and 10-year risks of ICA stenosis/occlusion in category 2 and 3 CSM patients were 7.5% and 12.4%, respectively. Five- and 10-year risks of ischemic stroke from ICA stenosis/occlusion in category 2 and 3 CSM patients were both 1.2%. Multivariate analysis showed patient age (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.86–0.98, p = 0.01), meningioma pathology (HR and 95% CI not defined, p = 0.03), and pre-SRS carotid category (HR 4.51, 95% CI 1.77–14.61, p = 0.004) to be associated with ICA stenosis/occlusion. Internal carotid artery stenosis/occlusion was not related to post-SRS tumor growth (HR and 95% CI not defined, p = 0.41).

CONCLUSIONS

New or progressive ICA stenosis/occlusion was common after SRS for CSM but was not observed after SRS for GHPA, suggesting a tumor-specific mechanism unrelated to radiation dose. Pre-SRS ICA encasement or constriction increases the risk of ICA stenosis/occlusion; however, the risk of ischemic complications is very low.

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Shota Tanaka, Fredric B. Meyer, Jan C. Buckner, Joon H. Uhm, Elizabeth S. Yan and Ian F. Parney

Object

Optimum management for elderly patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM) in the temozolomide (TMZ) era is not well defined. The object of this study was to clarify outcomes in this population.

Methods

The authors retrospectively reviewed 105 consecutive cases involving elderly patients (age ≥ 65 years) with newly diagnosed GBM who were treated at the Mayo Clinic between 2003 and 2008.

Results

The patients' median age was 74 years (range 66–87 years), and the median Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score was 80 (range 40–90). Half of the patients underwent biopsy and half underwent resection. Patients with deep-seated lesions (19 patients [18%]) or multifocal lesions (34 patients [32%]) were more likely to have biopsy than resection (p = 0.0001 and 0.0009, respectively). New persistent neurological deficits developed in 7 patients (6.7%). Postoperative hemorrhage occurred in 6 patients (5.7%), all of whom underwent biopsy. Complete follow-up data regarding adjuvant treatment was available in 84 patients. Forty-one (49%) were treated with chemotherapy (mostly TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT), and 23 (27%) with RT alone. Nineteen (23%) received only palliative care after surgery (more common with biopsy, p = 0.03). Chemotherapy complications occurred in 28.6% (Grade 3 or 4 hematological complications in 11.9%). The median values for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 3.5 and 5.5 months. In a multivariate analysis, younger age (p = 0.03, risk ratio [RR] 0.34, 95% CI 0.13–0.89), single lesion (p = 0.02, RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.30–0.89), resection (p = 0.04, RR 0.54, 95% CI 0.31–0.94), and adjuvant treatment (p = 0.0001, RR 0.24, 95% CI 0.11–0.49) were associated with better OS. Only adjuvant treatment was significantly associated with prolonged PFS (p = 0.0007, RR 0.27, 95% CI 0.13–0.57). With combined therapy with resection, RT, and chemotherapy, the median PFS and OS were 8 and 12.5 months, respectively.

Conclusions

The prognosis for GBM worsens with increasing age in elderly patients. With important risks, resection and adjuvant treatment are associated with prolonged survival. Although selection bias cannot be excluded in this retrospective study, advanced age alone should not necessarily preclude optimal resection followed by adjuvant radiochemotherapy.

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Justin S. Smith, Ian F. Parney, Kathleen R. Lamborn, Michael W. McDermott, Penny K. Sneed and Susan M. Chang

Object

This study was designed to assess the presentation, management, and outcome of cases involving patients who had a supratentorial glioma that subsequently progressed in the posterior fossa (PF).

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective chart review of adult patients treated between 1997 and 2005 for supratentorial gliomas that progressed in the PF. The 29 patients with PF progression in this study were relatively young (median age of 34 years at original presentation). Twenty of these patients presented with symptoms. The symptoms were typically nonspecific to this population, at times leading to delays in diagnosis. Overall, these symptoms resolved in eight patients (40%) and progressed or remained unchanged in 12 (60%). Patients treated with more than 5000 cGy of radiation administered to the PF were more likely to have symptom resolution than those who received any other form of treatment, including reduced doses of radiation (p = 0.004). The patients treated with higher doses also survived significantly longer after PF progression (univariate analysis, p = 0.01, and after adjusting for tumor grade, p = 0.04).

Conclusions

Patients with PF progression of supratentorial infiltrative gliomas may benefit from treatment, and the authors recommend more than 5000 cGy of radiation to the PF if prior radiotherapy ports and doses allow.

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Jason M. Hoover, Macaulay Nwojo, Ross Puffer, Jay Mandrekar, Fredric B. Meyer and Ian F. Parney

Object

The object of this study was to assess outcomes after surgery for recurrent intracranial glioma.

Methods

The authors retrospectively reviewed cases involving adult patients with intracranial glioma patients undergoing initial surgery (biopsy or resection) and one or more additional surgeries at their institution.

Results

A total of 323 operations were performed in 131 patients. The median survival was 76 months after first surgery, 36 months after second, 24 months after third, and 26.5 months after 4 or more surgeries. The overall complication rate was 12.8% after first surgery, 27.0% after second (OR 2.52, p = 0.0068), 22.0% after third (OR 1.92, not statistically significant [NS]), and 22.2% after 4 or more (OR 1.95, NS). Neurological complications occurred in 4.8% of patients at first surgery, 12.1% at second (OR 2.7, p = 0.0437), 8.2% at third (OR 1.75, NS), and 11.1% at 4 or more surgeries (OR 2.4583, NS). Regional complications occurred in 6.2% after first surgery, 9.9% after second surgery (OR 2.30, p = 0.095), 13.7% after third surgery (OR 3.31, p = 0.015), and 22.2% after 4 or more surgeries (OR 5.95, p = 0.056). Systemic complications occurred in 3.2% after first surgery, in 7.3% after second surgery (OR 2.3, p = 0.NS), in 4.1% after third surgery (OR 1.3, NS), and 0% after 4 or more surgeries. Reduction in Karnofsky Performance Status score occurred in 0% after first surgery, 8.1% after second surgery (OR 3.13, p = 0.0018), 10.2% after third surgery (OR 5.52, p < 0.0001), and 11.1% after 4 or more surgeries (OR 1.037, NS).

Conclusions

Postoperative survival is relatively prolonged but complication risk increases in patients with glioma who undergo multiple cranial surgeries. The largest increase in neurological risk occurs between the first and second surgery. In contrast, regional complication risk increases consistently with each surgery. The risk of systemic complications is not significantly altered with increasing surgeries. However, these complications only result in a modestly increased risk of functional decline after 2 or more surgeries. These findings may help counsel patients considering multiple glioma surgeries.

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Anshit Goyal, Yagiz U. Yolcu, Aakshit Goyal, Panagiotis Kerezoudis, Desmond A. Brown, Christopher S. Graffeo, Sandy Goncalves, Terence C. Burns and Ian F. Parney

OBJECTIVE

With the revised WHO 2016 classification of brain tumors, there has been increasing interest in imaging biomarkers to predict molecular status and improve the yield of genetic testing for diffuse low-grade gliomas (LGGs). The T2-FLAIR–mismatch sign has been suggested to be a highly specific radiographic marker of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutation and 1p/19q codeletion status in diffuse LGGs. The presence of T2-FLAIR mismatch indicates a T2-hyperintense lesion that is hypointense on FLAIR with the exception of a hyperintense rim.

METHODS

In accordance with PRISMA guidelines, we performed a systematic review of the Ovid Medline, Embase, Scopus, and Cochrane databases for reports of studies evaluating the diagnostic performance of T2-FLAIR mismatch in predicting the IDH and 1p/19q codeletion status in diffuse LGGs. Results were combined into a 2 × 2 format, and the following diagnostic performance parameters were calculated: sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and positive (LR+) and negative (LR−) likelihood ratios. In addition, we utilized Bayes theorem to calculate posttest probabilities as a function of known pretest probabilities from previous genome-wide association studies and the calculated LRs. Calculations were performed for 1) IDH mutation with 1p/19q codeletion (IDHmut-Codel), 2) IDH mutation without 1p/19q codeletion (IDHmut-Noncodel), 3) IDH mutation overall, and 4) 1p/19q codeletion overall. The QUADAS-2 (revised Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies) tool was utilized for critical appraisal of included studies.

RESULTS

A total of 4 studies were included, with inclusion of 2 separate cohorts from a study reporting testing and validation (n = 746). From pooled analysis of all cohorts, the following values were obtained for each molecular profile—IDHmut-Codel: sensitivity 30%, specificity 73%, LR+ 1.1, LR− 1.0; IDHmut-Noncodel: sensitivity 33.7%, specificity 98.5%, LR+ 22.5, LR− 0.7; IDH: sensitivity 32%, specificity 100%, LR+ 32.1, LR− 0.7; 1p/19q codeletion: sensitivity 0%, specificity 54%, LR+ 0.01, LR− 1.9. Bayes theorem was used to calculate the following posttest probabilities after a positive and negative result, respectively—IDHmut-Codel: 32.2% and 29.4%; IDHmut-Noncodel: 95% and 40%; IDH: 99.2% and 73.5%; 1p/19q codeletion: 0.4% and 35.1%.

CONCLUSIONS

The T2-FLAIR–mismatch sign was an insensitive but highly specific marker of IDH mutation and IDHmut-Noncodel profile, although significant exceptions may exist to this finding. Tumors with a positive sign may still be IDHwt or 1p/19q codeleted. These findings support the utility of T2-FLAIR mismatch as an imaging-based biomarker for positive selection of patients with IDH-mutant gliomas.