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So Hee Park, Myung Ji Kim, Hyun Ho Jung, Won Seok Chang, Hyun Seok Choi, Itay Rachmilevitch, Eyal Zadicario, and Jin Woo Chang

OBJECTIVE

Glioblastoma (GBM) remains fatal due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which interferes with the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of repeated disruption of the BBB (BBBD) with MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) in patients with GBM during standard adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy.

METHODS

This study was a prospective, single-center, single-arm study. BBBD with MRgFUS was performed adjacent to the tumor resection margin on the 1st or 2nd day of the adjuvant TMZ chemotherapy at the same targets for 6 cycles. T2*-weighted/gradient echo (GRE) MRI was performed immediately after every sonication trial, and comprehensive MRI was performed at the completion of all sonication sessions. Radiological, laboratory, and clinical evaluations were performed 2 days before each planned BBBD.

RESULTS

From September 2018, 6 patients underwent 145 BBBD trials at various locations in the brain. The authors observed gadolinium-enhancing spots at the site of BBBD on T1-weighted MRI in 131 trials (90.3%) and 93 trials (64.1%) showed similar spots on T2*-weighted/GRE MRI. When the 2 sequences were combined, BBBD was observed in 134 targets (92.4%). The spots disappeared on follow-up MRI. There were no imaging changes related to BBBD and no clinical adverse effects during the 6 cycles.

CONCLUSIONS

This study is the first in which repetitive MRgFUS was performed at the same targets with a standard chemotherapy protocol for malignant brain tumor. BBBD with MRgFUS was performed accurately, repeatedly, and safely. Although a longer follow-up period is needed, this study allows for the possibility of other therapeutic agents that previously could not be used due to the BBB.

Clinical trial registration no.: NCT03712293 (clinicaltrials.gov)

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Jang-Hyun Baek, Byung Moon Kim, Ji Hoe Heo, Dong Joon Kim, Hyo Suk Nam, Young Dae Kim, Hyun Seok Choi, Jun-Hwee Kim, and Jin Woo Kim

OBJECTIVE

Hyperattenuation on CT scanning performed immediately after endovascular treatment (EVT) is known to be associated with the final infarct. As flat-panel CT (FPCT) scanning is readily accessible within their angiography suite, the authors evaluated the ability of the extent of hyperattenuation on FPCT to predict clinical outcomes after EVT.

METHODS

Patients with successful recanalization (modified Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction grade 2b or 3) were reviewed retrospectively. The extent of hyperattenuation was assessed by the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score on FPCT (FPCT-ASPECTS). FPCT-ASPECTS findings were compared according to functional outcome and malignant infarction. The predictive power of the FPCT-ASPECTS with initial CT images before EVT (CT-ASPECTS) and follow-up diffusion-weighted images (MR-ASPECTS) was also compared.

RESULTS

A total of 235 patients were included. All patients were treated with mechanical thrombectomy, and 45.5% of the patients received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. The mean (± SD) time from stroke onset to recanalization was 383 ± 290 minutes. The FPCT-ASPECTS was significantly different between patients with a favorable outcome and those without (mean 9.3 ± 0.9 vs 6.7 ± 2.6) and between patients with malignant infarction and those without (3.4 ± 2.9 vs 8.8 ± 1.4). The FPCT-ASPECTS was an independent factor for a favorable outcome (adjusted OR 3.28, 95% CI 2.12–5.01) and malignant infarction (adjusted OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.31–0.57). The area under the curve (AUC) of the FPCT-ASPECTS for a favorable outcome (0.862, cutoff ≥ 8) was significantly greater than that of the CT-ASPECTS (0.637) (p < 0.001) and comparable to that of the MR-ASPECTS (0.853) (p = 0.983). For malignant infarction, the FPCT-ASPECTS was also more predictive than the CT-ASPECTS (AUC 0.906 vs 0.552; p = 0.001) with a cutoff of ≤ 5.

CONCLUSIONS

The FPCT-ASPECTS was highly predictive of clinical outcomes in patients with successful recanalization. FPCT could be a practical method to immediately predict clinical outcomes and thereby aid in acute management after EVT.

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Sang Hyun Suh, Byung Moon Kim, Sung Il Park, Dong Ik Kim, Yong Sam Shin, Eui Jong Kim, Eun Chul Chung, Jun Seok Koh, Hyun Cheol Shin, Chun Sik Choi, and Yu Sam Won

Object

A ruptured dissecting aneurysm of the vertebrobasilar artery (VBA-DA) is a well-known cause of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with a high rate of early rebleeding. Internal trapping of the parent artery, including the dissected segment, is one of the most reliable techniques to prevent rebleeding. However, for a ruptured VBA-DA not suitable for internal trapping, the optimal treatment method has not been well established. The authors describe their experience in treating ruptured VBA-DAs not amenable to internal trapping of the parent artery with stent-assisted coil embolization (SAC) followed by a stent-within-a-stent (SWS) technique.

Methods

Eleven patients—6 men and 5 women with a mean age of 48 years and each with a ruptured VBA-DA not amenable to internal trapping of the parent artery—underwent an SAC-SWS between November 2005 and October 2007. The feasibility and clinical and angiographic outcomes of this combined procedure were retrospectively evaluated.

Results

The SAC-SWS was successful without any treatment-related complications in all 11 patients. Immediate posttreatment angiograms revealed complete obliteration of the DA sac in 3 patients, near-complete obliteration in 7, and partial obliteration in 1. One patient died as a direct consequence of the initial SAH. All 10 surviving patients had excellent clinical outcomes (Glasgow Outcome Scale Score 5) without posttreatment rebleeding during a follow-up period of 8–24 months (mean follow-up 15 months). Angiographic follow-up at 6–12 months after treatment was possible at least once in all surviving patients. Nine VBA-DAs showed complete obliteration; the other aneurysm, which had appeared partially obliterated immediately after treatment, demonstrated progressive obliteration on 2 consecutive follow-up angiography studies. There was no in-stent stenosis or occlusion of the branch or perforating vessels.

Conclusions

The SAC-SWS technique seems to be a feasible and effective reconstructive treatment option for a ruptured VBA-DA. The technique may be considered as an alternative therapeutic option in selected patients with ruptured VBA-DAs unsuitable for internal trapping of the parent artery.