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  • Author or Editor: Hisayo Okamoto x
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Toshinori Hasegawa, Takenori Kato, Yoshihisa Kida, Motohiro Hayashi, Takahiko Tsugawa, Yoshiyasu Iwai, Mitsuya Sato, Hisayo Okamoto, Tadashige Kano, Seiki Osano, Osamu Nagano and Kiyoshi Nakazaki

OBJECT

The aim of this study was to explore the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with facial nerve schwannomas (FNSs).

METHODS

This study was a multiinstitutional retrospective analysis of 42 patients with FNSs treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) at 1 of 10 medical centers of the Japan Leksell Gamma Knife Society (JLGK1301). The median age of the patients was 50 years. Twenty-nine patients underwent GKS as the initial treatment, and 13 patients had previously undergone surgery. At the time of the GKS, 33 (79%) patients had some degree of facial palsy, and 21 (50%) did not retain serviceable hearing. Thirty-five (83%) tumors were solid, and 7 (17%) had cystic components. The median tumor volume was 2.5 cm3, and the median prescription dose to the tumor margin was 12 Gy.

RESULTS

The median follow-up period was 48 months. The last follow-up images showed partial remission in 23 patients and stable tumors in 19 patients. Only 1 patient experienced tumor progression at 60 months, but repeat GKS led to tumor shrinkage. The actuarial 3- and 5-year progression-free survival rates were 100% and 92%, respectively. During the follow-up period, 8 patients presented with newly developed or worsened preexisting facial palsy. The condition was transient in 3 of these patients. At the last clinical follow-up, facial nerve function improved in 8 (19%) patients, remained stable in 29 (69%), and worsened in 5 (12%; House-Brackmann Grade III in 4 patients, Grade IV in 1 patient). With respect to hearing function, 18 (90%) of 20 evaluated patients with a pure tone average of ≤ 50 dB before treatment retained serviceable hearing.

CONCLUSIONS

GKS is a safe and effective treatment option for patients with either primary or residual FNSs. All patients, including 1 patient who required repeat GKS, achieved good tumor control at the last follow-up. The incidence of newly developed or worsened preexisting facial palsy was 12% at the last clinical follow-up. In addition, the risk of hearing deterioration as an adverse effect of radiation was low. These results suggest that GKS is a safe alternative to resection.

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Takuya Kawabe, Masaaki Yamamoto, Yasunori Sato, Shoji Yomo, Takeshi Kondoh, Osamu Nagano, Toru Serizawa, Takahiko Tsugawa, Hisayo Okamoto, Atsuya Akabane, Kazuyasu Aita, Manabu Sato, Hidefumi Jokura, Jun Kawagishi, Takashi Shuto, Hideya Kawai, Akihito Moriki, Hiroyuki Kenai, Yoshiyasu Iwai, Masazumi Gondo, Toshinori Hasegawa, Soichiro Yasuda, Yasuhiro Kikuchi, Yasushi Nagatomo, Shinya Watanabe and Naoya Hashimoto

OBJECTIVE

In 1999, the World Health Organization categorized large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) of the lung as a variant of large cell carcinoma, and LCNEC now accounts for 3% of all lung cancers. Although LCNEC is categorized among the non–small cell lung cancers, its biological behavior has recently been suggested to be very similar to that of a small cell pulmonary malignancy. The clinical outcome for patients with LCNEC is generally poor, and the optimal treatment for this malignancy has not yet been established. Little information is available regarding management of LCNEC patients with brain metastases (METs). This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for patients with brain METs from LCNEC.

METHODS

The Japanese Leksell Gamma Knife Society planned this retrospective study in which 21 Gamma Knife centers in Japan participated. Data from 101 patients were reviewed for this study. Most of the patients with LCNEC were men (80%), and the mean age was 67 years (range 39–84 years). Primary lung tumors were reported as well controlled in one-third of the patients. More than half of the patients had extracranial METs. Brain metastasis and lung cancer had been detected simultaneously in 25% of the patients. Before GKRS, brain METs had manifested with neurological symptoms in 37 patients. Additionally, prior to GKRS, resection was performed in 17 patients and radiation therapy in 10. A small cell lung carcinoma–based chemotherapy regimen was chosen for 48 patients. The median lesion number was 3 (range 1–33). The median cumulative tumor volume was 3.5 cm3, and the median radiation dose was 20.0 Gy. For statistical analysis, the standard Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine post-GKRS survival. Competing risk analysis was applied to estimate GKRS cumulative incidences of maintenance of neurological function and death, local recurrence, appearance of new lesions, and complications.

RESULTS

The overall median survival time (MST) was 9.6 months. MSTs for patients classified according to the modified recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) system were 25.7, 11.0, and 5.9 months for Class 1+2a (20 patients), Class 2b (28), and Class 3 (46), respectively. At 12 months after GKRS, neurological death–free and deterioration–free survival rates were 93% and 87%, respectively. Follow-up imaging studies were available in 78 patients. The tumor control rate was 86% at 12 months after GKRS.

CONCLUSIONS

The present study suggests that GKRS is an effective treatment for LCNEC patients with brain METs, particularly in terms of maintaining neurological status.

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Toru Serizawa, Yoshinori Higuchi, Masaaki Yamamoto, Shigeo Matsunaga, Osamu Nagano, Yasunori Sato, Kyoko Aoyagi, Shoji Yomo, Takao Koiso, Toshinori Hasegawa, Kiyoshi Nakazaki, Akihito Moriki, Takeshi Kondoh, Yasushi Nagatomo, Hisayo Okamoto, Yukihiko Kohda, Hideya Kawai, Satoka Shidoh, Toru Shibazaki, Shinji Onoue, Hiroyuki Kenai, Akira Inoue and Hisae Mori

OBJECTIVE

In order to obtain better local tumor control for large (i.e., > 3 cm in diameter or > 10 cm3 in volume) brain metastases (BMs), 3-stage and 2-stage Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) procedures, rather than a palliative dose of stereotactic radiosurgery, have been proposed. Here, authors conducted a retrospective multi-institutional study to compare treatment results between 3-stage and 2-stage GKS for large BMs.

METHODS

This retrospective multi-institutional study involved 335 patients from 19 Gamma Knife facilities in Japan. Major inclusion criteria were 1) newly diagnosed BMs, 2) largest tumor volume of 10.0–33.5 cm3, 3) cumulative intracranial tumor volume ≤ 50 cm3, 4) no leptomeningeal dissemination, 5) no more than 10 tumors, and 6) Karnofsky Performance Status 70% or better. Prescription doses were restricted to between 9.0 and 11.0 Gy in 3-stage GKS and between 11.8 and 14.2 Gy in 2-stage GKS. The total treatment interval had to be within 6 weeks, with at least 12 days between procedures. There were 114 cases in the 3-stage group and 221 in the 2-stage group. Because of the disproportion in patient numbers and the pre-GKS clinical factors between these two GKS groups, a case-matched study was performed using the propensity score matching method. Ultimately, 212 patients (106 from each group) were selected for the case-matched study. Overall survival, tumor progression, neurological death, and radiation-related adverse events were analyzed.

RESULTS

In the case-matched cohort, post-GKS median survival time tended to be longer in the 3-stage group (15.9 months) than in the 2-stage group (11.7 months), but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.65). The cumulative incidences of tumor progression (21.6% vs 16.7% at 1 year, p = 0.31), neurological death (5.1% vs 6.0% at 1 year, p = 0.58), or serious radiation-related adverse events (3.0% vs 4.0% at 1 year, p = 0.49) did not differ significantly.

CONCLUSIONS

This retrospective multi-institutional study showed no differences between 3-stage and 2-stage GKS in terms of overall survival, tumor progression, neurological death, and radiation-related adverse events. Both 3-stage and 2-stage GKS performed according to the aforementioned protocols are good treatment options in selected patients with large BMs.