Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author or Editor: Hiroshi Hashizume x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Junichi Mizuno, Hiroshi Nakagawa, Tatsushi Inoue and Yoshio Hashizume

Object. The goal of this study was to elucidate the pathophysiological features and clinical significance of the magnetic resonance imaging—documented small intramedullary high signal intensity known as “snake-eye appearance” (SEA) in cases of compressive myelopathy such as cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

Methods. One hundred forty-four patients with compression myelopathy who underwent surgery between 1998 and 2000 were selected. Intramedullary high signal intensity was found in 79 cases and was divided into two types, SEA and non-SEA (NSEA). The Japan Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system was used for evaluation of pre- and postoperative neurological status. In nine cases of SEA autopsy was performed and specimens were histologically analyzed.

The improvement ratio determined by JOA score was 32.2 ± 15.1% in SEA, 47.1 ± 12.1% in NSEA, and 50 ± 18.3% (p < 0.01) in control cases in which high signal intesity was absent. There were significant differences among SEA, NSEA, and control groups. In a separate group of nine patients who died of unrelated causes, histological examination showed small cystic necrosis in the center of the central gray matter of the ventrolateral posterior column and significant neuronal loss in the flattened anterior horn.

Conclusions. Snake-eye appearance was found to be a product of cystic necrosis resulting from mechanical compression and venous infarction. Destruction of the gray matter accompanying significant neuronal loss in the anterior horn suggested that SEA is an unfavorable prognostic factor for the recovery of upper-extremity motor weakness.

Restricted access

Experimental spinal cord injury produced by slow, graded compression

Alterations of cortical and spinal evoked potentials

Johannes Schramm, Keizo Hashizume, Takanori Fukushima and Hiroshi Takahashi

✓ A new model of experimental spinal cord injury produced by slow, graded compression in cats is described. The extent of cord compression was evaluated by monitoring somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP's). The compression was exerted by means of a special screw-plate assembly with stepwise advancement of the compression plate at different time intervals and was completed when cortical SEP had disappeared. Every stage in the total course of gradual compression was expressed as a percentage of the total. Cortical and spinal SEP's were recorded at each increment. The SEP pattern was analyzed in terms of latency, amplitude, and wave form. It was noteworthy that SEP's were remarkably resistant to gradual compression. The amplitude of cortical SEP's began decreasing at a late stage of compression, usually at about 80% of total compression, and that of spinal SEP's some time earlier, at about 60% of total compression. They both then rapidly fell to zero. Cortical SEP's showed a slight increase in latency concurrent with the reduction of amplitude, while the latency of spinal SEP's was constant. Mid-thoracic SEP's showed considerable individual variation in wave form. Their changes were similar to those of cortical SEP. Thoracolumbar SEP's, recorded immediately rostral to the compression, showed little individual variation, and did not show flat recordings even with maximum compression. A small monophasic positive wave was present in all animals even after the cortical SEP's became flat. This “final potential” was assumed to be caused by electrotonic volume conduction from the activities of the dorsal white matter caudal to the compression site. The reversibility of SEP's after the release of compression was remarkable. Both cortical and spinal SEP's could show complete recovery even when histological examination demonstrated hemorrhagic necrosis. The present data show no linear correlation between SEP changes and degree of compression. There are no changes with slight or moderate degree of compression. Alterations of SEP's in slow compression models should suggest the presence of a severe degree of compression.

Restricted access

Hiroshi Shirozu, Akira Hashizume, Hiroshi Masuda, Akiyoshi Kakita, Hiroshi Otsubo and Shigeki Kameyama

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to elucidate the surgical strategy for focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) based on the interictal analysis on magnetoencephalography (MEG). For this purpose, the correlation between the spike onset zone (Sp-OZ) and the spike peak zone (Sp-PZ) on MEG was evaluated to clarify the differences in the Sp-OZ and its correlation with Sp-PZ in FCD subtypes to develop an appropriate surgical strategy.

METHODS

Forty-one FCD patients (n = 17 type I, n = 13 type IIa, and n = 11 type IIb) were included. The Sp-OZ was identified by the summation of gradient magnetic-field topography (GMFT) magnitudes at interictal MEG spike onset, and Sp-PZ was defined as the distribution of the equivalent current dipole (ECD) at spike peak. Correlations between Sp-OZ and Sp-PZ distributions were evaluated and compared with clinical factors and seizure outcomes retrospectively.

RESULTS

Good seizure outcomes (Engel class I) were obtained significantly more often in patients with FCD type IIb (10/11, 90.9%) than those with type IIa (4/13, 30.8%; p = 0.003) and type I (6/17, 35.3%; p = 0.004). The Sp-OZ was significantly smaller (1 or 2 gyri) in type IIb (10, 90.9%) than in type IIa (4, 30.8%; p = 0.003) or type I (9, 53.0%; p = 0.036). Concordant correlations between the Sp-OZ and Sp-PZ were significantly more frequent in type IIb (7, 63.6%) than in type IIa (1, 7.7%; p = 0.015) or type I (1, 5.8%; p = 0.004). Complete resection of the Sp-OZ achieved significantly better seizure outcomes (Engel class I: 9/10, 90%) than incomplete resection (11/31, 35.5%) (p = 0.003). In contrast, complete resection of the Sp-PZ showed no significant difference in good seizure outcomes (9/13, 69.2%) compared with incomplete resection (11/28, 39.3%).

CONCLUSIONS

The Sp-OZ detected by MEG using GMFT and its correlation with Sp-PZ were related to FCD subtypes. A discordant distribution between Sp-OZ and Sp-PZ in type I and IIa FCD indicated an extensive epileptogenic zone and a complex epileptic network. Type IIb showed a restricted epileptogenic zone with the smaller Sp-OZ and concordance between Sp-OZ and Sp-PZ. Complete resection of the Sp-OZ provided significantly better seizure outcomes than incomplete resection. Complete resection of the Sp-PZ was not related to seizure outcomes. There was a definite difference in the epileptogenic zone among FCD subtypes; hence, an individual surgical strategy taking into account the correlation between the Sp-OZ and Sp-PZ should be considered.

Full access

Akihito Minamide, Munehito Yoshida, Andrew K. Simpson, Hiroshi Yamada, Hiroshi Hashizume, Yukihiro Nakagawa, Hiroshi Iwasaki, Shunji Tsutsui, Motohiro Okada, Masanari Takami and Shin-ichi Nakao

OBJECTIVE

The goal of this study was to characterize the long-term clinical and radiological results of articular segmental decompression surgery using endoscopy (cervical microendoscopic laminotomy [CMEL]) for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and to compare outcomes to conventional expansive laminoplasty (ELAP).

METHODS

Consecutive patients with CSM who required surgical treatment were enrolled. All enrolled patients (n = 78) underwent CMEL or ELAP. All patients were followed postoperatively for more than 5 years. The preoperative and 5-year follow-up evaluations included neurological assessment (Japanese Orthopaedic Association [JOA] score), JOA recovery rates, axial neck pain (using a visual analog scale), the SF-36, and cervical sagittal alignment (C2–7 subaxial cervical angle).

RESULTS

Sixty-one patients were included for analysis, 31 in the CMEL group and 30 in the ELAP group. The mean preoperative JOA score was 10.1 points in the CMEL group and 10.9 points in the ELAP group (p > 0.05). The JOA recovery rates were similar, 57.6% in the CMEL group and 55.4% in the ELAP group (p > 0.05). The axial neck pain in the CMEL group was significantly lower than that in the ELAP group (p < 0.01). At the 5-year follow-up, cervical alignment was more favorable in the CMEL group, with an average 2.6° gain in lordosis (versus 1.2° loss of lordosis in the ELAP group [p < 0.05]) and lower incidence of postoperative kyphosis.

CONCLUSIONS

CMEL is a novel, less invasive technique that allows for multilevel posterior cervical decompression for the treatment of CSM. This 5-year follow-up data demonstrates that after undergoing CMEL, patients have similar neurological outcomes to conventional laminoplasty, with significantly less postoperative axial pain and improved subaxial cervical lordosis when compared with their traditional ELAP counterparts.

Restricted access

Akihito Minamide, Munehito Yoshida, Hiroshi Yamada, Yukihiro Nakagawa, Masaki Kawai, Kazuhiro Maio, Hiroshi Hashizume, Hiroshi Iwasaki and Shunji Tsutsui

Object

The authors undertook this study to document the clinical outcomes of microendoscopic laminotomy, a minimally invasive decompressive surgical technique using spinal endoscopy for lumbar decompression, in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS).

Methods

A total of 366 patients were enrolled in the study and underwent microendoscopic laminotomy between 2007 and 2010. Indications for surgery were single- or double-level LSS, persistent neurological symptoms, and failure of conservative treatment. Microendoscopy provided wide visualization through oblique lenses and allowed bilateral decompression via a unilateral approach, through partial resection of the base of the spinous process, thereby preserving the supraspinous and interspinous ligaments and contralateral musculature. Clinical symptoms and signs of low-back pain were evaluated prior to and following surgical intervention by applying the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ), and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). These items were evaluated preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively.

Results

Effective circumferential decompression was achieved in all patients. The 2-year follow-up evaluation was completed for 310 patients (148 men and 162 women; mean age 68.7 years). The average recovery rate based on the JOA score was 61.3%. The overall results were excellent in 34.9% of the patients, good in 34.9%, fair in 21.7%, and poor in 8.5%. The mean RMDQ score significantly improved from 11.3 to 4.8 (p < 0.001). In all categories of both JOABPEQ and SF-36, scores at 2 years' follow-up were significantly higher than those obtained before surgery (p < 0.001). Twelve surgery-related complications were identified: dural tear (6 cases [1.9%]), wrong-level operation (1 [0.3%]), transient neuralgia (4 [1.3%]), and infection (1 [0.3%]). All patients recovered, and there were no serious postoperative complications.

Conclusions

Microendoscopic laminotomy is a safe and very effective minimally invasive surgical technique for the treatment of degenerative LSS.

Restricted access

Ryo Taiji, Masanari Takami, Yasutsugu Yukawa, Hiroshi Hashizume, Akihito Minamide, Yukihiro Nakagawa, Hideto Nishi, Hiroshi Iwasaki, Shunji Tsutsui, Motohiro Okada, Sae Okada, Masatoshi Teraguchi, Shizumasa Murata, Takuhei Kozaki and Hiroshi Yamada

OBJECTIVE

Various surgical treatments have been reported for vertebral pseudarthrosis after osteoporotic vertebral fracture (OVF). However, the outcomes are not always good. The authors now have some experience with combined anterior-posterior short-segment spinal fusion (1 level above and 1 level below the fracture) using a wide-foot-plate expandable cage. Here, they report their surgical outcomes with this procedure.

METHODS

Between June 2016 and August 2018, 16 consecutive patients (4 male and 12 female; mean age 75.1 years) underwent short-segment spinal fusion for vertebral pseudarthrosis or delayed collapse after OVF. The mean observation period was 20.1 months. The level of the fractured vertebra was T12 in 4 patients, L1 in 3, L2 in 4, L3 in 3, and L4 in 2. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the lumbar Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale and 100-mm visual analog scale for low-back pain. Local kyphotic angle, intervertebral height, bone union rate, and instrumentation-related adverse events were investigated as imaging outcomes. The data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test.

RESULTS

The mean operating time was 334.3 minutes (range 256–517 minutes), and the mean blood loss was 424.9 ml (range 30–1320 ml). The only perioperative complication was a superficial infection of the posterior wound that was cured by irrigation. The lumbar JOA score and visual analog scale value improved from 11.2 and 58.8 mm preoperatively to 20.6 and 18.6 mm postoperatively, respectively. The mean local kyphotic angle and mean intervertebral height were 22.6° and 28.0 mm, respectively, before surgery, −1.5° and 40.5 mm immediately after surgery, and 7.0° and 37.1 mm at the final observation. Significant improvement was observed in both parameters immediately after surgery and at the final observation when compared with the preoperative values. Intraoperative endplate injury occurred in 8 cases, and progression of cage subsidence of 5 mm or more was observed in 2 of these cases. Proximal junctional kyphosis was observed in 2 cases. There were no cases of screw loosening. No cases required reoperation due to instrument-related adverse events. Bone union was observed in all 14 cases that had CT evaluation.

CONCLUSIONS

This short-segment fusion procedure is relatively minimally invasive, and local reconstruction and bone fusion have been achieved. This procedure is considered to be attempted for the surgical treatment of osteoporotic vertebral pseudarthrosis after OVF.

Restricted access

Shizumasa Murata, Akihito Minamide, Hiroshi Iwasaki, Yukihiro Nakagawa, Hiroshi Hashizume, Yasutsugu Yukawa, Shunji Tsutsui, Masanari Takami, Motohiro Okada, Keiji Nagata, Munehito Yoshida, Andrew J. Schoenfeld, Andrew K. Simpson and Hiroshi Yamada

OBJECTIVE

Persistent lumbar foraminal stenosis (LFS) is one of the most common reasons for poor postoperative outcomes and is a major contributor to “failed back surgery syndrome.” The authors describe a new surgical strategy for LFS based on anatomical considerations using 3D image fusion with MRI/CT analysis.

METHODS

A retrospective review was conducted on 78 consecutive patients surgically treated for LFS at the lumbosacral junction (2013–2017). The location and extent of stenosis, including the narrowest site and associated pathology (bone or soft tissue), were measured using 3D image fusion with MRI/CT. Stenosis was defined as medial intervertebral foraminal (MF; inner edge to pedicle center), lateral intervertebral foraminal (LF; pedicle center to outer edge), or extraforaminal (EF; outside the pedicle). Lumbar (low-back pain, leg pain) and patient satisfaction visual analog scale (VAS) scores and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores were evaluated. Surgical outcome was evaluated 2 years postoperatively.

RESULTS

Most instances of stenosis existed outside the pedicle’s center (94%), including LF (58%), EF (36%), and MF (6%). In all MF cases, stenosis resulted from soft-tissue structures. The narrowest stenosis sites were localized around the pedicle’s outer border. The areas for sufficient nerve decompression were extended in MF+LF (10%), MF+LF+EF (14%), LF+EF (39%), LF (11%), and EF (26%). No iatrogenic pars interarticularis damage occurred. The JOA score was 14.9 ± 2.6 points preoperatively and 22.4 ± 3.5 points at 2 years postoperatively. The JOA recovery rate was 56.0% ± 18.6%. The VAS score (low-back and leg pain) was significantly improved 2 years postoperatively (p < 0.01). According to patients’ self-assessment of the minimally invasive surgery, 62 (79.5%) chose “surgery met my expectations” at follow-up. Nine patients (11.5%) selected “I did not improve as much as I had hoped but I would undergo the same surgery for the same outcome.”

CONCLUSIONS

Most LFS existed outside the pedicle’s center and was rarely noted in the pars region. The main regions of stenosis were localized to the pedicle’s outer edge. Considering this anatomical distribution of LFS, the authors recommend that lateral fenestration should be the first priority for foraminal decompression. Other surgical options including foraminotomy, total facetectomy, and hemilaminectomy likely require more bone resections than LFS treatment. The microendoscopic surgery results were very good, indicating that this minimally invasive surgery was suitable for treating this disease.