Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Hideyuki Ohnishi x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Jun Karasawa, Hajime Touho, Hideyuki Ohnishi, Susumu Miyamoto and Haruhiko Kikuchi

✓ Between January, 1986, and October, 1990, 30 children with moyamoya disease, aged from 2 to 17 years, underwent omental transplantation to either the anterior or the posterior cerebral artery territory. The mean follow-up period was 3.8 years, ranging from 1.6 to 6.4 years. Seventeen patients had symptoms of monoparesis, paraparesis, and/or urinary incontinence and were treated using unilateral or bilateral omental transplantation to the anterior cerebral artery territory. Eleven patients had visual symptoms and were treated with unilateral or bilateral omental transplantation to the posterior cerebral artery territory.

Two patients had symptoms associated with both the anterior and the posterior cerebral arteries, and were treated with dual omental transplantations. All 19 patients treated with omental transplantation to the anterior cerebral artery and 11 (84.6%) of the 13 treated with omental transplantation to the posterior cerebral artery showed improvement in their neurological state. Patients with more collateral vessels via the omentum had more rapid and complete improvement in their neurological state. Patients with severe preoperative neurological deficits associated with the posterior cerebral artery had persistence of their symptoms.

Restricted access

Jun Karasawa, Hajime Touho, Hideyuki Ohnishi, Susumu Miyamoto and Haruhiko Kikuchi

✓ Between May, 1974, and March, 1991, 104 patients with moyamoya disease, all under 16 years old at the time of first surgery, underwent superficial temporal-to-middle cerebral artery anastomosis and/or encephalomyosynangiosis. The mean follow-up period was 9.6 years (range 4.8 to 16.0 years). Hemiplegia was the most frequent symptom before the first operation. Transient ischemic attacks (TIA's) were noted in 57 patients and minor stroke with hemiplegia in 44. The most frequent type of cortical dysfunction was aphasia (21 cases). Postoperatively, the incidence of TIA's and/or completed stroke with motor weakness of the extremities was markedly decreased, but visual disturbance progressed and major or minor stroke with visual disturbance was found in two cases. In patients under the age of 3 years, a major stroke prior to surgery resulted in a poor outcome in 36% of cases. Preoperative major stroke in patients between the ages of 3 and 7 years was less frequent, and poor outcomes were seen in 17% of this group. There were no major preoperative strokes in patients with surgery after the age of 7 years, and no poor outcomes were recorded in this group. A major preoperative stroke prior to surgery had adverse impact on the ultimate patient intelligence quotient (IQ) following surgery. All patients operated on after the age of 7 years had a normal or borderline IQ at follow-up examination.

Restricted access

Kenta Fujimoto, Hideyuki Ohnishi, Masahiko Tsujimoto, Tohru Hoshida and Yoichi Nakazato

✓ The authors present a case in which dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNETs) occurred in the cerebellum and brainstem of a 44-year-old woman. A magnetic resonance image of the brain revealed multiple cystic lesions in the right cerebellar hemisphere, vermis, tonsil, and brainstem. Partial removal of the tumors was performed. There were gray multinodular gelatinous lesions on the cerebellar hemisphere. Histologically, the tumors exhibited areas of multiple microcystic nodules in the cerebellar white matter, which were composed of oligodendroglia-like cells (OLCs), astrocytes, and neurons. There were multiple, variable nodules in the lesions, lined by OLCs. The adjacent cerebellar cortex displayed dysplastic features. Reduction of granule neurons and dislocation of Purkinje cells into the molecular layer were observed. The pathological profile of this patient agrees with that described by Daumas-Duport, et al., as a “dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor.”

Restricted access

Kenji Fukutome, Yoshihiro Kuga, Hideyuki Ohnishi, Hidehiro Hirabayashi and Hiroyuki Nakase

OBJECTIVE

Magnetic resonance imaging–guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) is a novel and useful treatment for essential tremor (ET); however, the factors impacting treatment outcome are unknown. The authors conducted this study to determine the factors affecting the outcome of MRgFUS.

METHODS

From May 2016 through August 2017, 15 patients with ET were admitted to Ohnishi Neurological Center and treated with MRgFUS. To determine the factors impacting treatment outcome, the authors retrospectively studied correlations between the Clinical Rating Scale for Tremor (CRST) improvement rate and age, disease duration, baseline CRST score, skull density ratio (SDR), skull volume, maximum delivered energy, or maximum temperature.

RESULTS

The mean CRST score was 18.5 ± 5.8 at baseline and 4.6 ± 5.7 at 1 year. The rate of improvement in the CRST score was 80% ± 22%. Younger age and lower baseline CRST score were correlated with a higher CRST improvement rate (p = 0.025 and 0.007, respectively). To obtain a CRST improvement rate ≥ 50%, a maximum temperature ≥ 55°C was necessary. There was no correlation between SDR and CRST improvement rate (p = 0.658). A lower SDR and higher skull volume required significantly higher maximum delivered energy (p = 0.014 and 0.016, respectively). A higher maximum temperature was associated with a significantly larger lesion volume (p = 0.026).

CONCLUSIONS

Younger age and lower baseline CRST score were favorable outcome factors. It is important to assess predictive factors when applying MRgFUS.