Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: Hans Delye x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Sebastian Arts, Hans Delye, and Erik J. van Lindert

OBJECTIVE

To compare minimally invasive endoscopic and open surgical procedures, to improve informed consent of parents, and to establish a baseline for further targeted improvement of surgical care, this study evaluated the complication rate and blood transfusion rate of craniosynostosis surgery in our department.

METHODS

A prospective complication registration database that contains a consecutive cohort of all pediatric neurosurgical procedures in the authors’ neurosurgical department was used. All pediatric patients who underwent neurosurgical treatment for craniosynostosis between February 2004 and December 2014 were included. In total, 187 procedures were performed, of which 121 were endoscopically assisted minimally invasive procedures (65%). Ninety-three patients were diagnosed with scaphocephaly, 50 with trigonocephaly, 26 with plagiocephaly, 3 with brachycephaly, 9 with a craniosynostosis syndrome, and 6 patients were suffering from nonsyndromic multisutural craniosynostosis.

RESULTS

A total of 18 complications occurred in 187 procedures (9.6%, 95% CI 6.2–15), of which 5.3% (n = 10, 95% CI 2.9–10) occurred intraoperatively and 4.2% (n = 8, 95% CI 2.2–8.2) occurred postoperatively. In the open surgical procedure group, 9 complications occurred: 6 intraoperatively and 3 postoperatively. In the endoscopically assisted procedure group, 9 complications occurred: 4 intraoperatively and 5 postoperatively. Blood transfusion was needed in 100% (n = 66) of the open surgical procedures but in only 21% (n = 26, 95% CI 15–30) of the endoscopic procedures. One patient suffered a transfusion reaction, and 6 patients suffered infections, only one of which was a surgical site infection. A dural tear was the most common intraoperative complication that occurred (n = 8), but it never led to postoperative sequelae. Intraoperative bleeding from a sagittal sinus occurred in one patient with only minimal blood loss. There were no deaths, permanent morbidity, or neurological sequelae.

CONCLUSIONS

Complications during craniosynostosis surgery were relatively few and minor and were without permanent sequelae in open and in minimally invasive procedures. The blood transfusion rate was significantly reduced in endoscopic procedures compared with open procedures.

Open access

Giselle Coelho, Eduardo Vieira, Jose Hinojosa, and Hans Delye

Craniosynostosis is a premature fusion of cranial sutures, and it requires surgery to decrease cranial pressure and remodel the affected areas. However, mastering these procedures requires years of supervised training. Several neurosurgical training simulators have been created to shorten the learning curve. Laboratory training is fundamental for acquiring familiarity with the necessary techniques and skills to properly handle instruments. This video presents a novel simulator for training on the endoscopic treatment for scaphocephaly and trigonocephaly, covering all aspects of the procedure, from patient positioning to performing osteotomies.

The video can be found here: https://vimeo.com/512526147.

Full access

Hans Delye, Tim Clijmans, Maurice Yves Mommaerts, Jos Vnder Sloten, and Jan Goffin

OBJECT

Finite element models (FEMs) of the head are used to study the biomechanics of traumatic brain injury and depend heavily on the use of accurate material properties and head geometry. Any FEM aimed at investigating traumatic head injury in children should therefore use age-specific dimensions of the head, as well as age-specific material properties of the different tissues. In this study, the authors built a database of age-corrected skull geometry, skull thickness, and bone density of the developing skull to aid in the development of an age-specific FEM of a child’s head. Such a database, containing age-corrected normative skull geometry data, can also be used for preoperative surgical planning and postoperative long-term follow-up of craniosynostosis surgery results.

METHODS

Computed tomography data were processed for 187 patients (age range 0–20 years old). A 3D surface model was calculated from segmented skull surfaces. Skull models, reference points, and sutures were processed into a MATLAB-supported database. This process included automatic calculation of 2D measurements as well as 3D measurements: length of the coronal suture, length of the lambdoid suture, and the 3D anterior-posterior length, defined as the sum of the metopic and sagittal suture. Skull thickness and skull bone density calculations were included.

RESULTS

Cephalic length, cephalic width, intercoronal distance, lateral orbital distance, intertemporal distance, and 3D measurements were obtained, confirming the well-established general growth pattern of the skull. Skull thickness increases rapidly in the first year of life, slowing down during the second year of life, while skull density increases with a fast but steady pace during the first 3 years of life. Both skull thickness and density continue to increase up to adulthood.

CONCLUSIONS

This is the first report of normative data on 2D and 3D measurements, skull bone thickness, and skull bone density for children aged 0–20 years. This database can help build an age-specific FEM of a child’s head. It can also help to tailor preoperative virtual planning in craniosynostosis surgery toward patient-specific normative target values and to perform objective long-term follow-up in craniosynostosis surgery.

Restricted access

Erik J. van Lindert, Hans Delye, and Jody Leonardo

Object

The authors conducted a study to compare the complication rate (CR) of pediatric neurosurgical procedures in a general neurosurgery department to the CRs that are reported in the literature and to establish a baseline of CR for further targeted improvement of quality neurosurgical care.

Methods

The authors analyzed the prospectively collected data from a complication registration of 1000 consecutive pediatric neurosurgical procedures in 581 patients from the beginning of the registration in January 2004 through August 2008. A pediatric neurosurgeon was involved in 50.5% of the procedures. All adverse events (AEs) from induction of anesthesia until 30 days postoperatively were recorded.

Results

Overall, 229 complications were counted in 202 procedures. The overall CR was 20.2%, with a 2.7% intraoperative CR and a 17.5% postoperative CR. Tumor surgery was associated with the highest CR (32.7%), followed by CSF disorders (21.8%). The mortality rate was 0.3%. An unplanned return to the operating room in relation to an AE happened in 10.5% of all procedures and in 52% of procedures associated with AEs, the majority of which were related to CSF disorders.

Conclusions

The CR in pediatric neurosurgical procedures was significant, and more than half of the patients with an AE required a repeat surgical procedure. Analysis of CRs should be a prerequisite for the prevention of complications and for the development of targeted interventions to reduce the CR (for example, infection rates).

Full access

Erik J. van Lindert, Sebastian Arts, Laura M. Blok, Mark P. Hendriks, Luc Tielens, Martine van Bilsen, and Hans Delye

OBJECTIVE

Minimal literature exists on the intraoperative complication rate of pediatric neurosurgical procedures with respect to both surgical and anesthesiological complications. The aim of this study, therefore, was to establish intraoperative complication rates to provide patients and parents with information on which to base their informed consent and to establish a baseline for further targeted improvement of pediatric neurosurgical care.

METHODS

A clinical complication registration database comprising a consecutive cohort of all pediatric neurosurgical procedures carried out in a general neurosurgical department from January 1, 2004, until July 1, 2012, was analyzed. During the study period, 1807 procedures were performed on patients below the age of 17 years.

RESULTS

Sixty-four intraoperative complications occurred in 62 patients (3.5% of procedures). Intraoperative mortality was 0.17% (n = 3). Seventy-eight percent of the complications (n = 50) were related to the neurosurgical procedures, whereas 22% (n = 14) were due to anesthesiology. The highest intraoperative complication rates were for cerebrovascular surgery (7.7%) and tumor surgery (7.4%). The most frequently occurring complications were cerebrovascular complications (33%).

CONCLUSIONS

Intraoperative complications are not exceptional during pediatric neurosurgical procedures. Awareness of these complications is the first step in preventing them.

Free access

Gerben E. Breimer, Ruben Dammers, Peter A. Woerdeman, Dennis R. Buis, Hans Delye, Marjolein Brusse-Keizer, and Eelco W. Hoving

OBJECTIVE

After endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV), some patients develop recurrent symptoms of hydrocephalus. The optimal treatment for these patients is not clear: repeat ETV (re-ETV) or CSF shunting. The goals of the study were to assess the effectiveness of re-ETV relative to initial ETV in pediatric patients and validate the ETV success score (ETVSS) for re-ETV.

METHODS

Retrospective data of 624 ETV and 93 re-ETV procedures were collected from 6 neurosurgical centers in the Netherlands (1998–2015). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to provide an adjusted estimate of the hazard ratio for re-ETV failure relative to ETV failure. The correlation coefficient between ETVSS and the chance of re-ETV success was calculated using Kendall’s tau coefficient. Model discrimination was quantified using the c-statistic. The effects of intraoperative findings and management on re-ETV success were also analyzed.

RESULTS

The hazard ratio for re-ETV failure relative to ETV failure was 1.23 (95% CI 0.90–1.69; p = 0.20). At 6 months, the success rates for both ETV and re-ETV were 68%. ETVSS was significantly related to the chances of re-ETV success (τ = 0.37; 95% bias corrected and accelerated CI 0.21–0.52; p < 0.001). The c-statistic was 0.74 (95% CI 0.64–0.85). The presence of prepontine arachnoid membranes and use of an external ventricular drain (EVD) were negatively associated with treatment success, with ORs of 4.0 (95% CI 1.5–10.5) and 9.7 (95% CI 3.4–27.8), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Re-ETV seems to be as safe and effective as initial ETV. ETVSS adequately predicts the chance of successful re-ETV. The presence of prepontine arachnoid membranes and the use of EVD negatively influence the chance of success.