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Richard E. Clatterbuck, Eric M. Oshiro, Patricia A. Hoffman, Gregory N. Dietsch, Drew M. Pardoll and Rafael J. Tamargo

Object. The authors have previously shown that a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognizes intercellular adhesion molecule—1 (ICAM-1), also known as CD54, when administered systemically inhibits experimental vasospasm in a rat femoral artery model, suggesting that ICAM-1 and leukocyte-endothelial adhesion play a crucial role in the molecular chain of events leading to posthemorrhagic vasospasm. In this report the authors confirm this hypothesis with mAbs directed against lymphocyte function-associated antigen—1 ([LFA-1] CD11a/CD18), the molecule on the surface of leukocytes that interacts with ICAM-1.

Methods. Femoral arteries in 38 Sprague—Dawley rats were isolated and exposed to autologous blood. Twenty-nine animals were then randomized into three groups and received intraperitoneal injections of anti—LFA-1 mAb (10 rats), anti—ICAM-1 mAb (10 rats), or an isotype-matched control mAb (nine rats). Injections were administered at 3 hours and 3, 6, and 9 days after surgery. Before their deaths, six animals underwent spleen harvest, and splenocytes were used in fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis to verify saturation of appropriate binding sites. Animals were killed at 12 days and vessels were harvested for histological study and measurement of the luminal cross-sectional area. Nine animals were randomized as earlier, killed 24 hours after a single injection of mAb, and evaluated for periadventitial infiltration of granulocytes and macrophages. Results of FACS analysis demonstrated saturation of both LFA-1 and ICAM-1 binding sites in animals treated with the respective mAb. The mean ratios of blood-exposed to saline-exposed luminal cross-sectional areas (expressed as the percentage of lumen patency) were 90.1 ± 5.8% (mean ± standard error of the mean) for animals treated with the anti—LFA-1 mAb (p = 0.0218), 94.2 ± 3.3% for animals treated with the anti-ICAM-1 mAb (p = 0.0067), and 62 ± 7.4% for animals treated with the isotype-matched control mAb. Macrophage and granulocyte counts in the periadventitial region were 39.5 ± 3.2/hpf for animals treated with anti—LFA-1 mAb (p = 0.001), 42 ± 3.7/hpf for animals treated with anti—ICAM-1 mAb (p = 0.003), and 72.2 ± 6.2/hpf for control animals.

Conclusions. The systemic administration of anti—LFA-1 or anti—ICAM-1 mAb initiated 3 hours after exposure to autologous blood inhibits the development of delayed chronic vasospasm at 12 days in a rat femoral artery model and leads to a significant reduction in periadventitial inflammatory cells at 24 hours. The authors conclude that blocking the migration of inflammatory cells across the endothelial surface of an artery after adventitial exposure to blood prevents the initiation of biological cascades necessary for the subsequent development of chronic vasospasm.

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Robert J. Jackson, Reginald J. Davis, Gregory A. Hoffman, Hyun W. Bae, Michael S. Hisey, Kee D. Kim, Steven E. Gaede and Pierce Dalton Nunley

OBJECTIVE

Cervical total disc replacement (TDR) has been shown in a number of prospective clinical studies to be a viable treatment alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of symptomatic degenerative disc disease. In addition to preserving motion, evidence suggests that cervical TDR may result in a lower incidence of subsequent surgical intervention than treatment with fusion. The goal of this study was to evaluate subsequent surgery rates up to 5 years in patients treated with TDR or ACDF at 1 or 2 contiguous levels between C-3 and C-7.

METHODS

This was a prospective, multicenter, randomized, unblinded clinical trial. Patients with symptomatic degenerative disc disease were enrolled to receive 1- or 2-level treatment with either TDR as the investigational device or ACDF as the control treatment. There were 260 patients in the 1-level study (179 TDR and 81 ACDF patients) and 339 patients in the 2-level study (234 TDR and 105 ACDF patients).

RESULTS

At 5 years, the occurrence of subsequent surgical intervention was significantly higher among ACDF patients for 1-level (TDR, 4.5% [8/179]; ACDF, 17.3% [14/81]; p = 0.0012) and 2-level (TDR, 7.3% [17/234]; ACDF, 21.0% [22/105], p = 0.0007) treatment. The TDR group demonstrated significantly fewer index- and adjacent-level subsequent surgeries in both the 1- and 2-level cohorts.

CONCLUSIONS

Five-year results showed treatment with cervical TDR to result in a significantly lower rate of subsequent surgical intervention than treatment with ACDF for both 1 and 2 levels of treatment.

Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00389597 (clinicaltrials.gov)

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Pierce D. Nunley, Marcus B. Stone, Michael S. Hisey, Kee D. Kim, Robert J. Jackson, Hyun W. Bae, Gregory A. Hoffman, Steven E. Gaede, Guy O. Danielson III, Charles Gordon, Reginald J. Davis and Bimal Rami

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Reginald J. Davis, Pierce Dalton Nunley, Kee D. Kim, Michael S. Hisey, Robert J. Jackson, Hyun W. Bae, Gregory A. Hoffman, Steven E. Gaede, Guy O. Danielson III, Charles Gordon and Marcus B. Stone

OBJECT

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of 2-level total disc replacement (TDR) using a Mobi-C cervical artificial disc at 48 months' follow-up.

METHODS

A prospective randomized, US FDA investigational device exemption pivotal trial of the Mobi-C cervical artificial disc was conducted at 24 centers in the US. Three hundred thirty patients with degenerative disc disease were randomized and treated with cervical total disc replacement (225 patients) or the control treatment, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) (105 patients). Patients were followed up at regular intervals for 4 years after surgery.

RESULTS

At 48 months, both groups demonstrated improvement in clinical outcome measures and a comparable safety profile. Data were available for 202 TDR patients and 89 ACDF patients in calculation of the primary endpoint. TDR patients had statistically significantly greater improvement than ACDF patients for the following outcome measures compared with baseline: Neck Disability Index scores, 12-Item Short Form Health Survey Physical Component Summary scores, patient satisfaction, and overall success. ACDF patients experienced higher subsequent surgery rates and displayed a higher rate of adjacent-segment degeneration as seen on radiographs. Overall, TDR patients maintained segmental range of motion through 48 months with no device failure.

CONCLUSIONS

Four-year results from this study continue to support TDR as a safe, effective, and statistically superior alternative to ACDF for the treatment of degenerative disc disease at 2 contiguous cervical levels.

Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00389597 (clinicaltrials.gov)

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Reginald J. Davis, Kee D. Kim, Michael S. Hisey, Gregory A. Hoffman, Hyun W. Bae, Steven E. Gaede, Ralph F. Rashbaum, Pierce Dalton Nunley, Daniel L. Peterson and John K. Stokes

Object

Cervical total disc replacement (TDR) is intended to treat neurological symptoms and neck pain associated with degeneration of intervertebral discs in the cervical spine. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) has been the standard treatment for these indications since the procedure was first developed in the 1950s. While TDR has been shown to be a safe and effective alternative to ACDF for treatment of patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD) at a single level of the cervical spine, few studies have focused on the safety and efficacy of TDR for treatment of 2 levels of the cervical spine. The primary objective of this study was to rigorously compare the Mobi-C cervical artificial disc to ACDF for treatment of cervical DDD at 2 contiguous levels of the cervical spine.

Methods

This study was a prospective, randomized, US FDA investigational device exemption pivotal trial of the Mobi-C cervical artificial disc conducted at 24 centers in the US. The primary clinical outcome was a composite measure of study success at 24 months. The comparative control treatment was ACDF using allograft bone and an anterior plate. A total of 330 patients were enrolled, randomized, and received study surgery. All patients were diagnosed with intractable symptomatic cervical DDD at 2 contiguous levels of the cervical spine between C-3 and C-7. Patients were randomized in a 2:1 ratio (TDR patients to ACDF patients).

Results

A total of 225 patients received the Mobi-C TDR device and 105 patients received ACDF. At 24 months only 3.0% of patients were lost to follow-up. On average, patients in both groups showed significant improvements in Neck Disability Index (NDI) score, visual analog scale (VAS) neck pain score, and VAS arm pain score from preoperative baseline to each time point. However, the TDR patients experienced significantly greater improvement than ACDF patients in NDI score at all time points and significantly greater improvement in VAS neck pain score at 6 weeks, and at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. On average, patients in the TDR group also maintained preoperative segmental range of motion at both treated segments immediately postoperatively and throughout the study period of 24 months. The reoperation rate was significantly higher in the ACDF group at 11.4% compared with 3.1% for the TDR group. Furthermore, at 24 months TDR demonstrated statistical superiority over ACDF based on overall study success rates.

Conclusions

The results of this study represent the first available Level I clinical evidence in support of cervical arthroplasty at 2 contiguous levels of the cervical spine using the Mobi-C cervical artificial disc. These results continue to support the use of cervical arthroplasty in general, but specifically demonstrate the advantages of 2-level arthroplasty over 2-level ACDF. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00389597 (ClinicalTrials.gov).