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Glenn W. Kindt

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Glenn W. Kindt and Trygve O. Gabrielsen

✓ Evidence of brain damage was demonstrated in two patients without significant mass lesions by the presence of early venous filling and abnormal contrast staining. The vascular changes were most prominent on subtraction films. It is likely that these angiograms demonstrated the “luxury perfusion” phenomenon described previously in areas of damaged brain.

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Julian R. Youmans and Glenn W. Kindt

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R. Harris Russo and Glenn W. Kindt

✓ A case of the bobble-head doll syndrome in association with aqueductal stenosis is presented. The relationship between the dilated third ventricle and adjacent thalamic nuclei as well as the somatotopic motor pattern of the dorsomedial thalamic nucleus is discussed.

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Glenn W. Kindt, Julian R. Youmans, and Louis W. Conway

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Glenn W. Kindt, Julian R. Youmans, and Otmar Albrand

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Thomas B. Ducker, Glenn W. Kindt, and Ludwig G. Kempe

✓ This study shows that spinal cord pathology secondary to acute trauma in monkeys evolves with stepwise sequential changes. The acute damage is more central than peripheral. Depending on the amount of trauma, the subacute damage may be limited to central gray necrosis or may progress or evolve to include the neighboring white matter. These pathological changes may be taking place even in the presence of clinical improvement.

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James E. Raisis, Glenn W. Kindt, John E. McGillicuddy, and Carole A. Miller

✓ Cerebral metabolism in 21 hydrocephalic patients was studied. Preoperative and postoperative specimens of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were obtained and the cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was calculated in each instance. The specimens of CSF were analyzed for lactate and pyruvate and the lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio was calculated for each sample. The L/P ratio, which reflects the redox state of the cell, was used to determine the extent of anaerobic metabolism. An inverse relationship was noted between CPP and lactate as well as the L/P ratio. In general, the level of anaerobic metabolism was decreased after insertion of a shunt.

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John E. McGillicuddy, Glenn W. Kindt, James E. Raisis, and Carole A. Miller

✓ A marked increase in intracranial pressure (ICP) produces a concomitant increase in systemic blood pressure (the Cushing response). In this study a comparison is made between this response of systemic blood pressure to increased ICP and the blood pressure responses produced by ischemia, hypoxia, and hypercarbia of the primate brain. A carotid-to-carotid cross-perfusion system was used to produce a purely cerebral hypoxia and hypercarbia. Each stimulus, except hypercarbia, produced a hypertensive response that was qualitatively and quantitatively similar. These responses were characterized by a short latent period, a rapid development, and an increase in mean arterial pressure of 60% or more. The similarity of the responses suggests that these stimuli act through a final common pathway independent of the purely mechanical effects of increased ICP upon the brain.