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Giovanni Di Chiro

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Angiography of the spinal cord

A review of contemporary techniques and applications

Giovanni Di Chiro and Louis Wener

✓ The authors present a current review of the development, techniques, and applications of angiographic studies of the spinal cord, with special emphasis on selective arteriography.

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John Doppman and Giovanni di Chiro

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Giovanni Di Chiro and Arthur S. Grove Jr.

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Louis Wener, Giovanni Di Chiro and Robert A. Mendelsohn

✓ An external carotid-cavernous fistula diagnosed by serial common carotid arteriography is reported. The diagnosis was reached on the basis of the difference in time between filling of the distal internal and external carotid arteries and the visualization of the fistula.

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Larry C. Fried, John L. Doppman and Giovanni Di Chiro

✓ The direction of blood flow in the cervical spinal cord of monkeys was studied by direct cinematic observation of the results of dye injections, plus separate angiographic studies. The studies indicated that in monkeys blood enters the cervical spinal cord mainly from radicular arteries that are usually derived from branches of the costo-cervical trunk. Although some blood entering at the low cervical level flows toward the thoracic cord, the major component flows up to the C-2 level. The findings cast doubt on the established assumption that the vertebral arteries provide the main blood supply of the cervical cord.

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Thomas H. Milhorat, Mary K. Hammock and Giovanni Di Chiro

✓ In congenital obstructive (internal) hydrocephalus, a coexisting obstruction of the subarachnoid space is frequently present. In the current study, cisternographic evidence is provided that considerable re-expansion of the subarachnoid space may occur after temporary ventricular drainage. These findings suggest that in at least some cases of obstructive hydrocephalus, the subarachnoid space is potentially open but mechanically compressed. The therapeutic significance of re-expanding the subarachnoid space by temporary ventricular shunts is discussed.

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Larry C. Fried, Giovanni Di Chiro and John L. Doppman