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Gavin A. Davis

✓Granular cell tumors of the ulnar nerve are extremely rare, with only two cases previously reported in the English literature. The author presents a case of granular cell tumor of the ulnar nerve, in which the tumor was resected and the nerve was repaired with a nerve graft. The histopathological characteristics, imaging findings, and clinical data regarding these tumors are reviewed, and based on all the available evidence, a new treatment paradigm is proposed, which differs from that used in the earlier reported cases and takes into account the reported rate of tumor recurrence after incomplete resection.

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Gavin A. Davis

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Gavin A. Davis and Simon Knight

Object

Pancoast tumors are aggressive bronchogenic lesions of the lung apex that are rapidly fatal if untreated. Modern treatment includes induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy prior to resection, but many authors also resect the T-1 nerve root (with or without the C-8 nerve root and the lower trunk of the brachial plexus) as part of the therapy, causing significant loss of hand function in many patients. The current authors determined whether a different approach allowing preservation of the brachial plexus and hand function could be adopted without compromising patient survival. An extensive historical review of Pancoast tumors is presented as a baseline for clinical comparison.

Methods

Five patients harboring Pancoast tumors with brachial plexus involvement underwent surgery performed by both a neurosurgeon and thoracic surgeon. In all cases the tumor was resected from the brachial plexus using neurolysis while preserving the C-8 and T-1 nerve roots and lower trunk of the brachial plexus.

Results

One patient died 3 years posttreatment; the other four patients remain alive and well 2 to 5 years postoperatively. Hand function improved or remained normal in all four survivors, with postoperative intrinsic hand muscle function being Louisiana State University Medical Center Grade 5 in each patient. These results (2-year survival rate of 100%) compare favorably with the Southwest Oncology Group Data (overall 2-year survival rate of 55%; 70% in patients who had undergone complete resection). With a minimum 2-year follow-up, 80% of patients remained alive and well, with normal hand function.

Conclusions

Although this patient series is small, the findings are extremely encouraging and suggest that the described treatment paradigm preserves survival as well as hand function in patients with Pancoast tumors.

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Gavin A. Davis and Ian H. Cox

Object

The etiology of intraneural ganglia has been debated for centuries, and only recently a unifying theory has been proposed. The incidence of tibial nerve intraneural ganglia is restricted to the occasional case report, and there are no reported cases of these lesions in children. While evidence of the unifying theory for intraneural ganglia of the common peroneal nerve is strong, there are only a few reports describing the application of the theory in the tibial nerve. In this report the authors examine tibial nerve intraneural ganglia at the ankle and knee in an adult and a child, respectively, and describe the clinical utility of incorporating the unifying (articular) theory in the management of tibial intraneural ganglia in adults and children.

Methods

Cases of tibial intraneural ganglion cysts were examined clinically, radiologically, operatively, and histologically to demonstrate the application of the unified (articular) theory for the development of these cysts in adults and children.

Results

Two patients with intraneural ganglion cysts of the tibial nerve were identified: an adult with an intraneural ganglion cyst of the tibial nerve at the tarsal tunnel and a child with an intraneural ganglion cyst of the tibial nerve at the knee. In each case, preoperative MR imaging demonstrated the intraneural cyst and its connection to the adjacent joint via the articular branch to the subtalar joint and superior tibiofibular joint. At surgery the articular branch was identified and resected, thus disconnecting the tibial nerve intraneural cyst from the joint of origin.

Conclusions

These cases detail the important features of intraneural ganglion cysts of the tibial nerve and document the clinical utility of incorporating the unifying (articular) theory for the surgical management of tibial intraneural ganglia in adults and children.

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Gavin A. Davis, Gregory J. Fitt, Renate M. Kalnins and L. Anne Mitchell

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Chow Huat Chan, Richard G. Bittar, Gavin A. Davis, Renate M. Kalnins and Gavin C. A. Fabinyi

Object

Resection of dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNET) is thought to result in favorable seizure outcome, but long-term follow-up data are scarce. The authors present a review of 18 patients who underwent surgical removal of a DNET: 12 via temporal lobectomy and six via lesionectomy.

Methods

The mean long-term follow up was 10.8 years (median 10.4 years, range 7.8 to 14.8 years), and results obtained during this time period were compared with previously reported short-term (mean 2.7 years) seizure outcome data. In the current study, 66.7% patients had an Engel Class I outcome and 55.6% had an Engel Class IA outcome compared with 77.8% and 55.6%, respectively. Temporal lobectomy (Engel Class I, 83.3%; Engel Class IA, 66.7%) led to a better seizure outcome than lesionectomy (Engel Classes I and IA, 33.3%). Two patients (11.1%) required repeated operation and both had an incomplete lesionectomy initially.

Conclusions

Results indicated that complete resection of a DNET leads to a favorable seizure outcome, with epilepsy cure in those who had experienced early postoperative seizure relief. Long-term seizure outcome after surgery is predictable based on the result of short-term follow up.

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Oral Presentations

2010 AANS Annual Meeting Philadelphia, Pennsylvania May 1–5, 2010