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  • Author or Editor: Fredric B. Meyer x
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Introduction

Focal cerebral ischemia

Fredric B. Meyer

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Editorial

Gamma Knife surgery and brain metastases

Fredric B. Meyer

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Fredric B. Meyer

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Michelle J. Clarke and Fredric B. Meyer

✓The mathematical modeling of hydrocephalus is a relatively young field. The discipline evolved from Hakim's initial description of the brain as a water-filled sponge. Nagashima and colleagues subsequently translated this description into a computer-driven model by defining five important system rules. A number of researchers have since criticized and refined the method, providing additional system constraints or alternative approaches. Such efforts have led to an increased understanding of ventricular shape change and the development of periventricular lucency on imaging studies. However, severe limitations exist, precluding the use of the mathematical model to influence the operative decisions of practicing surgeons. In this paper, the authors explore the history, limitations, and future of the mathematical model of hydrocephalus.

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Fredric B. Meyer

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Fredric B. Meyer

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Fredric B. Meyer and Donald A. Muzzi

✓ A strategy for intraoperative cerebral protection is described in which intraoperative electroencephalography is used to titrate the level of inspired isoflurane given for anesthesia to obtain isoelectricity prior to temporary vessel occlusion during repair of difficult aneurysms. During temporary vessel occlusion, arterial blood pressure is maintained or increased with an inotropic or vasopressor agent. After clipping of the aneurysm, the concentration of isoflurane is reduced to allow the patient to awaken in the operating room for early postoperative neurological examination. The combination of a high concentration of isoflurane, temporary vessel occlusion, and maintenance of arterial blood pressure may be a useful protective regimen during neurovascular procedures.