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  • Author or Editor: Fengping Zhu x
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Fengping Zhu, Yi Qian, Bin Xu, Yuxiang Gu, Kaavya Karunanithi, Wei Zhu, Liang Chen, Ying Mao and Michael K. Morgan

OBJECTIVE

Although intracranial vessel remodeling has been observed in moyamoya disease, concerns remain regarding the effect of bypass surgery on hemodynamic changes within the internal carotid artery (ICA). The authors aimed to quantify the surgical effect of bypass surgery on bilateral ICAs in moyamoya disease and to estimate pressure drop (PD) along the length of the ICA to predict surgical outcomes.

METHODS

Records of patients who underwent bypass surgery for treatment of moyamoya disease and in whom flow rates were obtained pre- and postsurgery by quantitative MR angiography were retrospectively reviewed. Quantitative MR angiography and computational fluid dynamics were applied to measure morphological and hemodynamic changes during pre- and postbypass procedures. The results for vessel diameter, volumetric flow, PD, and mean wall shear stress along the length of the ICA were analyzed. Subgroup analysis was performed for the circle of Willis (CoW) configurations.

RESULTS

Twenty-three patients were included. The PD in ICAs on the surgical side (surgical ICAs) decreased by 21.18% (SD ± 30.1%) and increased by 11.75% (SD ± 28.6%) in ICAs on the nonsurgical side (contralateral ICAs) (p = 0.001). When the PD in contralateral ICAs was compared between patients with a complete or incomplete CoW, the authors found that the PDI in the former group decreased by 2.45% and increased by 20.88% in the latter (p = 0.05). Regression tests revealed that a greater postoperative decrease in PD corresponded to shrinking of ICAs (R2 = 0.22, p = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

PD may be used as a reliable biomechanical indicator for the assessment of surgical treatment outcomes. The vessel remodeling characteristics of contralateral ICA were related to CoW configurations.

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N. U. Farrukh Hameed, Tianming Qiu, Dongxiao Zhuang, Junfeng Lu, Zhengda Yu, Shuai Wu, Bin Wu, Fengping Zhu, Yanyan Song, Hong Chen and Jinsong Wu

OBJECTIVE

Insular lobe gliomas continue to challenge neurosurgeons due to their complex anatomical position. Transcortical and transsylvian corridors remain the primary approaches for reaching the insula, but the adoption of one technique over the other remains controversial. The authors analyzed the transcortical approach of resecting insular gliomas in the context of patient tumor location based on the Berger-Sinai classification, achievable extents of resection (EORs), overall survival (OS), and postsurgical neurological outcome.

METHODS

The authors studied 255 consecutive cases of insular gliomas that underwent transcortical tumor resection in their division. Tumor molecular pathology, location, EOR, postoperative neurological outcome for each insular zone, and the accompanying OS were incorporated into the analysis to determine the value of this surgical approach.

RESULTS

Lower-grade insular gliomas (LGGs) were more prevalent (63.14%). Regarding location, giant tumors (involving all insular zones) were most prevalent (58.82%) followed by zone I+IV (anterior) tumors (20.39%). In LGGs, tumor location was an independent predictor of survival (p = 0.003), with giant tumors demonstrating shortest patient survival (p = 0.003). Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation was more likely to be associated with giant tumors (p < 0.001) than focal tumors located in a regional zone. EOR correlated with survival in both LGG (p = 0.001) and higher-grade glioma (HGG) patients (p = 0.008). The highest EORs were achieved in anterior-zone LGGs (p = 0.024). In terms of developing postoperative neurological deficits, patients with giant tumors were more susceptible (p = 0.038). Postoperative transient neurological deficit was recorded in 12.79%, and permanent deficit in 15.70% of patients. Patients who developed either transient or permanent postsurgical neurological deficits exhibited poorer survival (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

The transcortical surgical approach can achieve maximal tumor resection in all insular zones. In addition, the incorporation of adjunct technologies such as multimodal brain imaging and mapping of cortical and subcortical eloquent brain regions into the transcortical approach favors postoperative neurological outcomes, and prolongs patient survival.