Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 124 items for

  • Author or Editor: Feng Feng x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Shih-Tseng Lee and Jyi-Feng Chen

✓ The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and feasibility of closed reduction vertebroplasty for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

Two hundred consecutive patients (183 women and 17 men) with single-level osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture were included in this study. After induction of general anesthesia, the patient was placed prone on an operating table. Closed reduction of the fractured and kyphotic spine was achieved by extending the table to restore the kyphotic angle and vertebral body (VB) height. Percutaneous vertebroplasty was then performed to treat the fractured vertebra. The results were quantitatively evaluated, according to the concept of estimated VB height. The anterior, middle, and posterior VB heights of the fractured vertebra were measured preoperatively and immediately after surgery by studying plain standing lateral radiographs.

In 162 (81%) of the compression fractures the anterior VB height was restored (57.1 ± 24.8% of lost anterior VB height); in 152 (76%) of the compression fractures the middle VB height was restored (61.4 ± 20.6% of lost middle VB height); and in 52 (26%) of the compression fractures the posterior VB height was restored (51.3 ± 23.1% of lost posterior VB height). In 141 (71.5%) of the compression fractures kyphosis was corrected by 12.5 ± 3.8° [mean 61.6 ± 23.7%]).

Closed reduction vertebroplasty is an efficacious and simple method in the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture and was able to restore the VB height and kyphotic angle in postions of fractured vertebrae. Its associated, long-term effects on treated vertebrae, however, need further evaluation.

Restricted access

Jyi-Feng Chen and Shih-Tseng Lee

Object

The purpose of this study was to introduce a method for making a hollow cylindrical polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) strut for perioperative anterior spinal reconstruction after discectomy and/or corpectomy.

Methods

For use after anterior cervical discectomy or corpectomy, the authors created a hollow cylindrical PMMA strut using 10- and 3-ml disposable plastic syringes filled with PMMA containing 10% BaSO4 for anterior spinal reconstruction.

Results

With this method, the authors were able to make a PMMA strut that was approximately 50 mm in length with a 14-mm outer diameter and a 10-mm inner diameter. The PMMA strut could easily be cut with a saw to any desired length and molded with a cutting bur. The PMMA strut was used as a substitute for the cortical bone and was filled with bone graft for cervical spinal reconstruction after discectomy and/or corpectomy. The whole process of making the PMMA strut can be completed within 30 minutes, and it reduces costs by at least $1000 US (in 1-level discectomy), making the procedure cost effective.

Conclusions

It is simple to make a hollow cylindrical PMMA strut with plastic syringes during a discectomy and/or corpectomy. The strut can provide adequate support at less cost than other methods. The hollow cylindrical strut is also of suitable size and length for anterior spinal reconstruction. It serves as an alternative for patients who cannot afford the expense of similar instruments or who cannot or do not want to take the risk of a human graft for anterior spinal reconstruction.

Free access

Zihao Chen, Bin Liu, Jianwen Dong, Feng Feng, Ruiqiang Chen, Peigen Xie, Liangming Zhang and Limin Rong

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness and safety of anterior corpectomy and fusion (ACF) with laminoplasty for the treatment of patients diagnosed with cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL).

METHODS

The authors searched electronic databases for relevant studies that compared the use of ACF with laminoplasty for the treatment of patients with OPLL. Data extraction and quality assessment were conducted, and statistical software was used for data analysis. The random effects model was used if there was heterogeneity between studies; otherwise, the fixed effects model was used.

RESULTS

A total of 10 nonrandomized controlled studies involving 819 patients were included. Postoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score (p = 0.02, 95% CI 0.30–2.81) was better in the ACF group than in the laminoplasty group. The recovery rate was superior in the ACF group for patients with an occupying ratio of OPLL of ≥ 60% (p < 0.00001, 95% CI 21.27–34.44) and for patients with kyphotic alignment (p < 0.00001, 95% CI 16.49–27.17). Data analysis also showed that the ACF group was associated with a higher incidence of complications (p = 0.02, 95% CI 1.08–2.59) and reoperations (p = 0.002, 95% CI 1.83–14.79), longer operation time (p = 0.01, 95% CI 17.72 –160.75), and more blood loss (p = 0.0004, 95% CI 42.22–148.45).

CONCLUSIONS

For patients with an occupying ratio ≥ 60% or with kyphotic cervical alignment, ACF appears to be the preferable treatment method. Nevertheless, laminoplasty seems to be effective and safe enough for patients with an occupying ratio < 60% or with adequate cervical lordosis. However, it must be emphasized that a surgical strategy should be made based on the individual patient. Further randomized controlled trials comparing the use of ACF with laminoplasty for the treatment of OPLL should be performed to make a more convincing conclusion.

Full access

Ali Tayebi Meybodi, Michael T. Lawton, Xuequan Feng and Arnau Benet

OBJECTIVE

Reimplantation of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) to the vertebral artery (VA) is a safe and effective bypass option after deliberate PICA sacrifice during the treatment of nonsaccular and dissecting aneurysms at this location. However, the anatomy and limitations of this technique have not been studied. The goal of this study was to define the surgical anatomy and buffer lengths specific to the proximal segment of the PICA related to 2 variations of PICA reimplantation: 1) reimplantation “along-VA” (simulating a dissecting VA aneurysm), and 2) reimplantation “across-VA” (simulating a nonclippable, proximal PICA aneurysm).

METHODS

Ten cadaver heads (20 sides) were prepared for surgical simulation. Twenty far-lateral approaches were performed. The PICA was mobilized and reimplanted onto the VA according to 2 different paradigms: 1) transposition along the axis of the VA (along-VA) to simulate a dissecting VA, and 2) transposition perpendicular to the axis of the VA (across-VA) to simulate a nonclippable, proximal PICA aneurysm. The buffer lengths provided by mobilization of the artery in each paradigm were measured and the anatomy of perforator branching on the proximal PICAs was analyzed.

RESULTS

The PICA was reimplanted in all surgical simulations. The most common perforating artery on the P1 and P2 segments was the short circumflex type. No direct perforator was found on the P1 segment. The mean buffer length with reimplantation along the VA axis was 13.43 ± 4.61 mm, and it was 6.97 ± 4.04 mm with reimplantation across the VA. The PICA was less maneuverable when it was reimplanted across the VA, due to perforator branches of the PICA (P3 segment).

CONCLUSIONS

The buffer lengths measured in this study describe the limitations of PICA reimplantation as a revascularization procedure for nonsaccular aneurysms in this location. PICA reimplantation is a revascularization option for dissecting VA aneurysms incorporating the PICA origin that are < 13 mm in length, and for nonsaccular proximal PICA aneurysms that are < 6 mm in diameter. The final decision to reimplant the PICA depends on careful inspection of perforator anatomy that is not visible preoperatively on angiography, as well as an assessment of technical difficulty intraoperatively.

Restricted access

Letter to the Editor

Endoscopic third ventriculostomy

Taopheeq Bamidele Rabiu

Full access

Jinping Liu and Hailong Feng

Restricted access

Jyi-Feng Chen and Shih-Tseng Lee

✓ Antibiotic–polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement and beads constitute an effective system of local drug delivery of antibiotic agents in patients with bone and soft-tissue infections. Debridement followed by implantation of antibiotic–PMMA beads and systemic administration of antibiotic agents has achieved a 100% success rate in treating chronic osteomyelitis; however, there have been no reports of an antibiotic–PMMA strut for treating spinal pyogenic spondylitis. In this case report we describe a 57-year-old woman with C5–6 pyogenic spondylitis, progressive kyphotic deformity, and neurological deficits. The patient underwent anterior C-5 and C-6 corpectomy and spinal reconstruction in which we used an antibiotic–PMMA strut. The strut was 14 mm in diameter and contained PMMA and vancomycin powder. The operation was technically successful, and no complication related to anesthesia or the surgical procedure occurred. At the 12-month follow-up examination, dynamic radiographs revealed cervical spine stabilization. The patient’s neck pain subsided and she recovered neurologically with no residual infection. No antibiotic–PMMA strut dislodgment or failure was identified; however, 9.8% subsidence of the strut into the vertebrae was observed. The long-term outcome in this case requires further evaluation.

Restricted access

Jyi-Feng Chen, Chieh-Tsai Wu and Shih-Tseng Lee

✓ Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a useful procedure for patients with vertebral osteoporotic compression fractures; however, there has been no mention in the literature of the use of percutaneous vertebroplasty for the treatment of traumatic spinal fractures. The authors report the case of a 33-year-old man who harbored L-1, L-2, and L-5 burst fractures sustained in a work-related accident. The patient was successfully treated by percutaneous vertebroplasty with polymethylmethacrylate. The authors propose this procedure as a useful intervention in selected patients with lumbar burst fractures. The complications associated with major surgical procedures are absent.

Restricted access

Jianwen Dong, Limin Rong, Feng Feng, Bin Liu, Yichun Xu, Qiyou Wang, Ruiqiang Chen and Peigen Xie

Object

Treatment of patients with single-segment degenerative lumbar instability using unilateral pedicle screw fixation can achieve stability and fusion rates similar to those of bilateral pedicle screw fixation. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome of using unilateral pedicle screw fixation through a tubular retractor via the Wiltse approach to treat single-segment degenerative lumbar instability.

Methods

Thirty-nine consecutive patients with single-segment, low-grade, degenerative lumbar instability were randomly assigned to treatment with either unilateral (n = 20) or bilateral (n = 19) pedicle screw fixation. In the unilateral group, patients underwent unilateral posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and ipsilateral pedicle screw fixation through a tubular retractor via the Wiltse approach. In the bilateral group, patients underwent modified bilateral PLIF with bilateral pedicle screw fixation via the posterior midline approach. During follow-up, patients were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS), the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, and the Oswestry Disability Index.

Results

The unilateral group had a shorter operative duration (p < 0.05) and less blood loss (p < 0.001). All patients completed more than 2 years of follow-up (mean 36 months). In general, the time trends in improvement on the VAS and JOA differed slightly between the groups through 2 years, but no significant difference in back pain VAS score or leg pain VAS score was found between these 2 groups at the 2-year follow-up. Complete bone fusion was shown on CT in all patients at the 2-year follow-up.

Conclusions

Unilateral pedicle screw fixation through a tubular retractor via the Wiltse approach appears to be as safe and effective as bilateral pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of single-segment degenerative lumbar instability.

Restricted access

Feng-Tao Liu, Li-Qin Lang, Ren-Yuan Zhou, Rui Feng, Jie Hu, Jian Wang and Jian-Jun Wu

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a well-established therapy for patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), dystonia, and other movement disorders. In contrast to the strong positive effects that have been documented for motor symptoms, the effects of DBS on nonmotor symptoms have not been fully elucidated. Some reports suggest that stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus may improve lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with PD; however, reports of the effects of globus pallidus internus (GPi) DBS on urinary symptoms are limited. The authors present the case of a 49-year-old woman with PD who developed severe urinary incontinence after 27 months of GPi DBS. The urinary incontinence disappeared when stimulation was turned off, and reemerged after it was turned on again. After activation of a more dorsal contact in the left electrode, the patient’s urinary dynamics returned to normal.