Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for

  • Author or Editor: Eric M. Jackson x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Eric M. Jackson and Alan R. Cohen

Full access

Eric M. Jackson, Ning Lin, Sunil Manjila, R. Michael Scott and Edward R. Smith

Object

Patients with moyamoya who are younger than 2 years of age represent a therapeutic challenge because of their frequent neurological instability and concomitant anesthetic risks. The authors report their experience with pial synangiosis revascularization in this population.

Methods

The authors reviewed the clinical and radiographic records of all patients with moyamoya in a consecutive series of patients under 2 years of age, who underwent cerebral revascularization surgery using pial synangiosis at a single institution.

Results

During a 12-year period (1994–2005), 34 procedures (bilateral in 15 patients, unilateral in 4) were performed in 19 patients younger than 2 years (out of a total of 456 procedures in 240 patients). Eighteen of these patients presented with either stroke or transient ischemic attack. The average age of the 19 patients at first surgery was 1.4 years (range 6 months–1.9 years). Unanticipated staged operations occurred in 3 patients, due to persistent electroencephalographic changes during the initial surgery in 2 cases and due to brain swelling during the procedure requiring ventriculostomy in the other. There were 2 perioperative strokes; both patients had postoperative seizures but made clinical recoveries. The average follow-up was 7 years (range 1–14 years). Long term, at follow-up, 13 patients (68%) were clinically independent for their age, with 8 (42%) having no significant deficit. Late complications included subdural hygroma evacuation (1), additional revascularization procedures performed years later for frontal lobe ischemia (2), late infarction (1), and asymptomatic ischemic change on routine follow-up MRI studies (1). All patients who had both pre- and postoperative angiography demonstrated progression of disease.

Conclusions

Despite the challenges inherent to this population, the majority of children with moyamoya under the age of 2 years have a good long-term prognosis. The data from this study support the use of pial synangiosis as a safe, effective, and durable method for treatment of moyamoya for most children in this potentially high-risk population.

Free access

Cormac O. Maher, Hugh J. L. Garton, Wajd N. Al-Holou, Jonathan D. Trobe, Karin M. Muraszko and Eric M. Jackson

Object

Arachnoid cysts may occasionally be associated with subdural hygromas. The management of these concurrent findings is controversial.

Methods

The authors reviewed their experience with arachnoid cysts and identified 8 patients with intracranial arachnoid cysts and an associated subdural hygroma. The medical records and images for these patients were also examined.

Results

In total, 8 patients presented with concurrent subdural hygroma and arachnoid cyst. Of these 8 patients, 6 presented with headaches and 4 had nausea and vomiting. Six patients had a history of trauma. One patient was treated surgically at the time of initial presentation, and 7 patients were managed without surgery. All patients experienced complete resolution of their presenting signs and symptoms.

Conclusions

Subdural hygroma may lead to symptomatic presentation for otherwise asymptomatic arachnoid cysts. The natural course of cyst-associated subdural hygromas, even when symptomatic, is generally benign, and symptom resolution can be expected in most cases. The authors suggest that symptomatic hygroma is not an absolute indication for surgical treatment and that expectant management can result in good outcomes in many cases.

Full access

Eric M. Jackson, Daniel M. Schwartz, Anthony K. Sestokas, Deborah M. Zarnow, N. Scott Adzick, Mark P. Johnson, Gregory G. Heuer and Leslie N. Sutton

Object

Fetal myelomeningocele closure has been shown to be advantageous in a number of areas. In this study, the authors report on neural function in patients who had previously undergone fetal myelomeningocele repair and returned to the authors' institution for further surgery that included intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

Methods

The authors retrospectively reviewed data obtained in 6 cases involving patients who underwent fetal myelomeningocele repair and later returned to their institution for spinal cord untethering. (In 4 of the 6 cases, the patients also underwent removal of a dermoid cyst [3 cases] or removal of an epidermoid cyst [1 case] during the untethering procedure.) Records and imaging studies were reviewed to identify the anatomical level of the myelomeningocele as well as the functional status of each patient. Stimulated electromyography (EMG) and transcranial motor evoked potential (tcMEP) recordings obtained during surgery were reviewed to assess the functional integrity of the nerve roots and spinal cord.

Results

During reexploration, all patients had reproducible signals at or below their anatomical level on stimulated EMG and tcMEP recordings. Corresponding to these findings, prior to tethering, all patients had antigravity muscle function below their anatomical level.

Conclusions

All 6 patients had lower-extremity function and neurophysiological monitoring recording signals at or below their anatomical level. These cases provide direct evidence of spinal cord and nerve root conductivity and functionality below the anatomical level of the myelomeningocele, further supporting that neurological status improves with fetal repair.

Full access

Kevin M. Stanko, Young M. Lee, Jennifer Rios, Adela Wu, Giovanna W. Sobrinho, Jon D. Weingart, Eric M. Jackson, Edward S. Ahn, Kaisorn L. Chaichana and George I. Jallo

OBJECT

Chiari Type I malformation involves caudal displacement of the cerebellar tonsils below the foramen magnum, which obstructs normal cerebrospinal fluid flow and increases intracranial pressure. Certain aspects of its surgical treatment remain controversial. A retrospective study was conducted to assess the efficacy of tonsillar cautery on syrinx resolution among pediatric Chiari patients undergoing cervicomedullary decompression.

METHODS

A retrospective cohort study was performed for patients 0–18 years of age who underwent surgical correction for Chiari Type I malformation with syrinx between 1995 and 2013. Basic demographic information was collected as well as data for preoperative symptoms, prior surgical history, perioperative characteristics, and postsurgical outcomes. Descriptive statistics were performed in addition to bivariate analyses. Candidate predictor variables were identified based on an association with tonsillar cautery with p < 0.10. Forward stepwise likelihood ratio was used to select candidate predictors in a binary logistic regression model (Pin = 0.05, Pout = 0.10) most strongly associated with the outcome.

RESULTS

A total of 171 patients with Chiari Type I malformation with syrinx were identified, and 43 underwent tonsillar cautery. Patients who underwent tonsillar cautery had 6.11 times greater odds of improvement in their syrinx (95% CI 2.57–14.49, p < 0.001). There was no effect of tonsillar cautery on increased perioperative complications as well as the need for repeat decompressions.

CONCLUSIONS

Tonsillar cautery is safe and effective in the treatment of Chiari Type I malformation with syrinx and may decrease time to syrinx resolution after cervicomedullary decompression. Tonsillar cautery does not increase postoperative complications in pediatric Chiari Type I malformation patients.

Restricted access

Andrew C. Vivas, Nir Shimony, Eric M. Jackson, Risheng Xu, George I. Jallo, Luis Rodriguez, Gerald F. Tuite and Carolyn M. Carey

OBJECTIVE

Hydrocephalus associated with subdural hygromas is a rare complication after decompression of Chiari malformation type I (CM-I). There is no consensus for management of this complication. The authors present a series of 5 pediatric patients who underwent CM-I decompression with placement of a dural graft complicated by posterior fossa hygromas and hydrocephalus that were successfully managed nonoperatively.

METHODS

A retrospective review over the last 5 years of patients who presented with hydrocephalus and subdural hygromas following foramen magnum decompression with placement of a dural graft for CM-I was conducted at 2 pediatric institutions. Their preoperative presentation, perioperative hospital course, and postoperative re-presentation are discussed with attention to their treatment regimen and ultimate outcome. In addition to reporting these cases, the authors discuss all similar cases found in their literature review.

RESULTS

Over the last 5 years, the authors have encountered 194 pediatric cases of CM-I decompression with duraplasty equally distributed at the 2 institutions. Of those cases, 5 pediatric patients with a delayed postoperative complication involving hydrocephalus and subdural hygromas were identified. The 5 patients were managed nonoperatively with acetazolamide and high-dose dexamethasone; dosages of both drugs were adjusted to the age and weight of each patient. All patients were symptom free at follow-up and exhibited resolution of their pathology on imaging. Thirteen similar pediatric cases and 17 adult cases were identified in the literature review. Most reported cases were treated with CSF diversion or reoperation. There were a total of 4 cases previously reported with successful nonoperative management. Of these cases, only 1 case was reported in the pediatric population.

CONCLUSIONS

De novo hydrocephalus, in association with subdural hygromas following CM-I decompression, is rare. This presentation suggests that these complications after posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty can be treated with nonoperative medical management, therefore obviating the need for CSF diversion or reoperation.

Restricted access

Gregory G. Heuer, Heather Kiefer, Alexander R. Judkins, Jean Belasco, Jaclyn A. Biegel, Eric M. Jackson, Marc Cohen, Bert W. O'Malley Jr. and Phillip B. Storm

The authors present the case of en bloc resection of a clival-C2 atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor. These aggressive lesions of early childhood generally occur in the cerebellum or cerebral hemispheres. This 7-year-old boy presented with pain on turning his head and was found to have a clival-C2 mass. A metastatic workup was negative for disseminated disease. A transoral biopsy procedure revealed an atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor on histological examination. The tumor was resected via a transoral approach, and the patient's spine was stabilized with posterior instrumented fusion from the occiput to C-5. Postoperatively, the patient underwent 16 months of chemotherapy along with 6 weeks of overlapping radiation therapy. Twenty-seven months after the initial surgery he presented with leg pain and was found to have a solitary metastatic lesion at the conus medullaris. There was no local recurrence at the clivus. The conus tumor was resected and found to be consistent with the primary tumor. Several months later the patient presented with disseminated intrathecal disease and ultimately died 42 months after the initial resection.

Restricted access

Lauren N. Huddle, Christine Fuller, Tiffany Powell, Judith A. Hiemenga, Jia Yan, Brian Deuell, Eric M. Lyders, Joann N. Bodurtha, Peter R. Papenhausen, Colleen K. Jackson-Cook, Arti Pandya, Margie Jaworski, Gary W. Tye and Ann M. Ritter

The authors report a rare case of multiple intracranial fetuses in fetu, fulfilling Willis' traditional criteria, which include an axial and appendicular skeleton with surrounding organized tissue. This case was ascertained from studies of a full-term female neonate who presented with ventriculomegaly. A CT scan showed intracranial calcifications that were suggestive of an axial skeleton. Her birth weight was 3.176 kg (50th–75th percentile), length was 52 cm (90th percentile), head circumference was 35 cm (50th–75th percentile), and Apgar scores were 7 and 8 at 1 and 5 minutes, respectively. Prenatal ultrasonography studies performed at 12 weeks and 5 days, and 19 weeks and 6 days revealed normal findings. A 37-week prenatal ultrasonography study showed ventriculomegaly and obstructive hydrocephalus, with a possible intracranial teratoma. Cranial imaging at birth with ultrasonography, CT and MR imaging, and MR angiography demonstrated 2 complex intraventricular masses with cystic, solid, and bony elements. A craniotomy with resection of the masses was performed at 3 months of age. The infant survived and is now 12 months old with some developmental progress. Two axial skeletons, with accompanying rib cage and extremities, including well-formed feet and toes, were noted. Both anencephalic structures had skin with hair, fat, skeletal and smooth muscle, and bony structures with bone marrow and focal areas of calcification. Multiple viscera were present and included thymus, bowel, stomach, salivary gland, kidney, adrenal gland, lung, and presumed adnexal structures. A diagnosis of fetuses in fetu was rendered. Chromosomal studies of the child and tissue from the 2 fetuses in fetu showed normal female karyotypes. A single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis from the proband infant and tissue from the 2 identified fetuses in fetu appeared to be genetically identical. These results are consistent with a monozygotic twin embryonic origin of the fetus in fetu tissue, which is a mechanism that has been suggested in previous reports in which karyotypes, blood types, and limited genetic loci have been studied. This is the first report of a rare example of intracranial intraventricular twin fetuses in fetu for which a genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism assay has confirmed their genetic identity.