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Hugh D. Moulding, James B. Elder, Eric Lis, Dale M. Lovelock, Zhigang Zhang, Yoshiya Yamada and Mark H. Bilsky

Object

Adjuvant radiation following epidural spinal cord decompression for tumor is a powerful tool used to achieve local disease control and preserve neurological function. To the authors' knowledge, only 1 published report addresses adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery after this procedure, but that study used significantly lower doses than are currently prescribed. The authors review their experience using high-dose single-fraction radiosurgery as a postoperative adjuvant following surgical decompression and instrumentation to assess long-term local tumor control, morbidity, and survival.

Methods

A retrospective chart review identified 21 patients treated with surgical decompression and instrumentation for high-grade, epidural, spinal cord compression from tumor, followed by single-fraction high-dose spinal radiosurgery (dose range 18–24 Gy, median 24 Gy). Spinal cord dose was limited to a cord maximal dose of 14 Gy. Tumor histologies, time between surgery and radiosurgery, time to local recurrence after radiosurgery as assessed by serial MR imaging, and time to death were determined. Competing risk analysis was used to evaluate these end points.

Results

In this series, 20 tumors treated (95%) were considered highly radioresistant to conventional external beam radiation. The planning target volume received a high dose (24 Gy) in 16 patients (76.2%), and a low dose (18 or 21 Gy) in 5 patients (23.8%). During the study, 15 (72%) of 21 patients died, and in all cases death was due to systemic progression as opposed to local failure. The median overall survival after radiosurgery was 310 days (range 37 days to not reached). One patient (4.8%) underwent repeat surgery for local failure and 2 patients (9.5%) underwent spine surgery for other reasons. Local control was maintained after radiosurgery in 17 (81%) of 21 patients until death or most recent follow-up, with an estimated 1-year local failure risk of 9.5%. Of the failures, 3 of 4 were noted in patients receiving low-dose radiosurgery, equaling an overall failure rate of 60% (3 of 5 patients) and a 1-year local failure estimated risk of 20%. Those patients receiving adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery with a high dose had a 93.8% overall local control rate (15 of 16 patients), with a 1-year estimated failure risk of 6.3%. Competing risk analysis showed this to be a significant difference between radiosurgical doses. One patient experienced a significant radiation-related complication; there were no wound-related issues after radiosurgery.

Conclusions

Spine radiosurgery after surgical decompression and instrumentation for tumor is a safe and effective technique that can achieve local tumor control until death in the vast majority of patients. In this series, those patients who received a higher radiosurgical dose had a significantly better local control rate.

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Eric W. Sankey, Benjamin D. Elder, Ann Liu, Kathryn A. Carson, C. Rory Goodwin, Ignacio Jusué-Torres and Daniele Rigamonti

OBJECTIVE

Factors associated with emergency department admission and/or shunt revision for idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) are unclear. In this study, the associations of several factors with emergency department admission and shunt revision for IIH were explored.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective review of 31 patients (169 total emergency department visits) who presented to the emergency department for IIH-related symptoms between 2003 and 2015. Demographics, comorbidities, symptoms, IIH diagnosis and treatment history, ophthalmological examination, diagnostic lumbar puncture (LP), imaging findings, and data regarding admission and management decisions were collected. Multivariable general linear models regression analysis was performed to assess the predictive factors associated with admission and shunt revision.

RESULTS

Thirty-one adult patients with a history of shunt placement for IIH visited the emergency department a total of 169 times for IIH-related symptoms, with a median of 3 visits (interquartile range 2–7 visits) per patient. Five patients had more than 10 emergency department visits. Baseline factors associated with admission included male sex (OR 10.47, 95% CI 2.13–51.56; p = 0.004) and performance of an LP (OR 3.10, 95% CI 1.31–7.31; p = 0.01). Contrastingly, older age at presentation (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.90–0.99; p = 0.01), and a greater number of prior emergency department visits (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.89–0.99; p = 0.02) were slightly protective against admission. The presence of papilledema (OR 11.62, 95% CI 3.20–42.16; p < 0.001), Caucasian race (OR 40.53, 95% CI 2.49–660.09 p = 0.009), and systemic hypertension (OR 7.73, 95% CI 1.11–53.62; p = 0.03) were independent risk factors for shunt revision. In addition, a greater number of prior emergency department visits (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.77–0.96; p = 0.009) and older age at presentation (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.87–0.99; p = 0.02) were slightly protective against shunt revision, while there was suggestive evidence that presence of a programmable shunt (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.05–1.14; p = 0.07) was a protective factor against shunt revision. Of note, location of the proximal catheter in the ventricle or lumbar subarachnoid space was not significantly associated with admission or shunt revision in the multivariable analyses.

CONCLUSIONS

The decision to admit a shunt-treated patient from the emergency department for symptoms related to IIH is challenging. Knowledge of factors associated with the need for admission and/or shunt revision is required. In this study, factors such as male sex, younger age at presentation, lower number of prior emergency department visits, and performance of a diagnostic LP were independent predictors of admission. In addition, papilledema was strongly predictive of the need for shunt revision, highlighting the importance of an ophthalmological examination for shunt-treated adults with IIH who present to the emergency department.

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Eric W. Sankey, C. Rory Goodwin, Ignacio Jusué-Torres, Benjamin D. Elder, Jamie Hoffberger, Jennifer Lu, Ari M. Blitz and Daniele Rigamonti

OBJECT

Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is the treatment of choice for obstructive hydrocephalus; however, the success of ETV in patients who have previously undergone shunt placement remains unclear. The present study analyzed 103 adult patients with aqueductal stenosis who underwent ETV for obstructive hydrocephalus and evaluated the effect of previous shunt placement on post-ETV outcomes.

METHODS

This study was a retrospective review of 151 consecutive patients who were treated between 2007 and 2013 with ETV for hydrocephalus. One hundred three (68.2%) patients with aqueductal stenosis causing obstructive hydrocephalus were included in the analysis. Postoperative ETV patency and aqueductal and cisternal flow were assessed by high-resolution, gradient-echo MRI. Post-ETV Mini-Mental State Examination, Timed Up and Go, and Tinetti scores were compared with preoperative values. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed comparing the post-ETV outcomes in patients who underwent a primary (no previous shunt) ETV (n = 64) versus secondary (previous shunt) ETV (n = 39).

RESULTS

The majority of patients showed significant improvement in symptoms after ETV; however, no significant differences were seen in any of the quantitative tests performed during follow-up. Symptom recurrence occurred in 29 (28.2%) patients after ETV, after a median of 3.0 (interquartile range 0.8–8.0) months post-ETV failure. Twenty-seven (26.2%) patients required surgical revision after their initial ETV. Patients who received a secondary ETV had higher rates of symptom recurrence (p = 0.003) and surgical revision (p = 0.003), particularly in regard to additional shunt placement/revision post-ETV (p = 0.005). These differences remained significant after multivariate analysis for both symptom recurrence (p = 0.030) and surgical revision (p = 0.043).

CONCLUSIONS

Patients with obstructive hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis exhibit symptomatic improvement after ETV, with a relatively low failure rate. Patients with a primary history of shunt placement who undergo ETV as a secondary intervention are at increased risk of symptom recurrence and need for surgical revision post-ETV.

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Sharif Vakili, Dane Moran, Alice Hung, Benjamin D. Elder, Lee Jeon, Hugo Fialho, Eric W. Sankey, Ignacio Jusué-Torres, C. Rory Goodwin, Jennifer Lu, Jamie Robison and Daniele Rigamonti

OBJECTIVE

A growing body of evidence suggests that longer durations of preoperative symptoms may correlate with worse postoperative outcomes following cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion for treatment of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). The aim of this study is to determine whether the duration of preoperative symptoms alters postoperative outcomes in patients treated for iNPH.

METHODS

The authors conducted a retrospective review of 393 cases of iNPH involving patients treated with ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunting. The duration of symptoms prior to the operative intervention was recorded. The following outcome variables were assessed at baseline, 6 months postoperatively, and at last follow-up: gait performance, urinary continence, and cognition.

RESULTS

The patients' median age at shunt placement was 74 years. Increased symptom duration was significantly associated with worse gait outcomes (relative risk (RR) 1.055 per year of symptoms, p = 0.037), and an overall absence of improvement in any of the classic triad symptomology (RR 1.053 per year of symptoms, p = 0.033) at 6 months postoperatively. Additionally, there were trends toward significance for symptom duration increasing the risk of having no 6-month postoperative improvement in urinary incontinence (RR 1.049 per year of symptoms, p = 0.069) or cognitive symptoms (RR 1.051 per year of symptoms, p = 0.069). However, no statistically significant differences were noted in these outcomes at last follow-up (median 31 months). Age stratification by decade revealed that prolonging symptom duration was significantly associated with lower Mini-Mental Status Examination scores in patients aged 60–70 years, and lack of cognitive improvement in patients aged 70–80 years.

CONCLUSIONS

Patients with iNPH with longer duration of preoperative symptoms may not receive the same short-term benefits of surgical intervention as patients with shorter duration of preoperative symptoms. However, with longer follow-up, the patients generally reached the same end point. Therefore, when managing patients with iNPH, it may take longer to see the benefits of CSF shunting when patients present with a longer duration of preoperative symptoms.

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Ann Liu, Eric W. Sankey, C. Rory Goodwin, Thomas A. Kosztowski, Benjamin D. Elder, Ali Bydon, Timothy F. Witham, Jean-Paul Wolinsky, Ziya L. Gokaslan and Daniel M. Sciubba

OBJECT

Spinal metastases from gynecological cancers are rare, with few cases reported in the literature. In this study, the authors examine a series of patients with spinal metastases from gynecological cancer and review the literature.

METHODS

The cases of 6 consecutive patients who underwent spine surgery for metastatic gynecological cancer between 2007 and 2012 at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. The recorded demographic, operative, and postoperative factors were reviewed, and the functional outcomes were determined by change in Karnofsky Performance Scale and the American Spine Injury Association (ASIA) score during follow-up. A systematic review of the literature was also performed to evaluate outcomes for patients with similar gynecological metastases to the spine.

RESULTS

In this series, details regarding metastatic gynecological cancers to the spine are as follows: 2 patients with cervical cancer (both presented at age 46 years, mean postoperative survival of 32 months), 2 patients with endometrial cancer (mean age of 40 years, mean postoperative survival of 26 months), and 2 patients with leiomyosarcoma (mean age of 44 years, mean postoperative survival of 20 months). All patients presented with pain, and no complications were noted following surgery. All patients with known follow-up had stable or improved neurological outcomes, performance status, and improved pain, without local recurrence of tumor. Overall median survival after diagnosis of metastatic spine lesions for all cases in the literature as well as those treated by the authors was 15 months. When categorized by type, median survival of patients with cervical cancer (n = 2), endometrial cancer (n = 26), and leiomyosarcoma (n = 16) was 32, 10, and 22.5 months, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Gynecological cancers metastasizing to the spine are rare. In this series, overall survival following diagnosis of spinal metastasis and surgery was 27 months, with cervical cancer, endometrial cancer, and leiomyosarcoma survival being 32, 26, and 20 months, respectively. Combined with literature cases, survival differs depending on primary histology, with decreasing survival from cervical cancer (32 months) to leiomyosarcoma (22.5 months) to endometrial cancer (10 months). Integrating such information with other patient factors may more accurately guide decision making regarding management of such spinal lesions.

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C. Rory Goodwin, Eric W. Sankey, Ann Liu, Benjamin D. Elder, Thomas Kosztowski, Sheng-Fu L. Lo, Charles G. Fisher, Michelle J. Clarke, Ziya L. Gokaslan and Daniel M. Sciubba

OBJECT

Surgical procedures and/or adjuvant therapies are effective modalities for the treatment of symptomatic spinal metastases. However, clinical results specific to the skin cancer spinal metastasis cohort are generally lacking. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature for treatments, clinical outcomes, and survival following the diagnosis of a skin cancer spinal metastasis and evaluate prognostic factors in the context of spinal skin cancer metastases stratified by tumor subtype.

METHODS

The authors performed a literature review using PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and Web of Science to identify articles since 1950 that reported survival, clinical outcomes, and/or prognostic factors for the skin cancer patient population with spinal metastases. The methodological quality of reviews was assessed using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) tool.

RESULTS

Sixty-five studies met the preset criteria and were included in the analysis. Of these studies, a total of 25, 40, 25, and 12 studies included patients who underwent some form of surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or observation alone, respectively. Sixty-three of the 65 included studies were retrospective in nature (Class of Evidence [CoE] IV), and the 2 prospective studies were CoE II. Based on the studies analyzed, the median overall survival for a patient with a spinal metastasis from a primary skin malignancy is 4.0 months; survival by tumor subtype is 12.5 months for patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 4.0 months for those with melanoma, 4.0 months for those with squamous cell carcinoma, 3.0 months for those with pilomatrix carcinoma, and 1.5 months for those with Merkel cell carcinoma (p < 0.0001). The overall percentage of known continued disease progression after spine metastasis diagnosis was 40.1% (n = 244/608, range 25.0%–88.9%), the rate of known recurrence of the primary skin cancer lesion was 3.5% (n = 21/608, range 0.2%–100.0%), and the rate of known spine metastasis recurrence despite treatment for all skin malignancies was 2.8% (n = 17/608, range 0.0%–33.3%). Age greater than 65 years, sacral spinal involvement, presence of a neurological deficit, and nonambulatory status were associated with decreased survival in patients diagnosed with a primary skin cancer spinal metastasis. All other clinical or prognostic parameters were of low or insufficient strength.

CONCLUSIONS

Patients diagnosed with a primary skin cancer metastasis to the spine have poor overall survival with the exception of those with BCC. The median duration of survival for patients who received surgical intervention alone, medical management (chemotherapy and/or radiation) alone, or the combination of therapies was similar across interventions. Age, spinal region, and neurological status may be associated with poor survival following surgery.

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Jaymin Jhaveri, Mudit Chowdhary, Xinyan Zhang, Robert H. Press, Jeffrey M. Switchenko, Matthew J. Ferris, Tiffany M. Morgan, Justin Roper, Anees Dhabaan, Eric Elder, Bree R. Eaton, Jeffrey J. Olson, Walter J. Curran Jr., Hui-Kuo G. Shu, Ian R. Crocker and Kirtesh R. Patel

OBJECTIVE

The optimal margin size in postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases is unknown. Herein, the authors investigated the effect of SRS planning target volume (PTV) margin on local recurrence and symptomatic radiation necrosis postoperatively.

METHODS

Records of patients who received postoperative LINAC-based SRS for brain metastases between 2006 and 2016 were reviewed and stratified based on PTV margin size (1.0 or > 1.0 mm). Patients were treated using frameless and framed SRS techniques, and both single-fraction and hypofractionated dosing were used based on lesion size. Kaplan-Meier and cumulative incidence models were used to estimate survival and intracranial outcomes, respectively. Multivariate analyses were also performed.

RESULTS

A total of 133 patients with 139 cavities were identified; 36 patients (27.1%) and 35 lesions (25.2%) were in the 1.0-mm group, and 97 patients (72.9%) and 104 lesions (74.8%) were in the > 1.0–mm group. Patient characteristics were balanced, except the 1.0-mm cohort had a better Eastern Cooperative Group Performance Status (grade 0: 36.1% vs 19.6%), higher mean number of brain metastases (1.75 vs 1.31), lower prescription isodose line (80% vs 95%), and lower median single fraction–equivalent dose (15.0 vs 17.5 Gy) (all p < 0.05). The median survival and follow-up for all patients were 15.6 months and 17.7 months, respectively. No significant difference in local recurrence was noted between the cohorts. An increased 1-year rate of symptomatic radionecrosis was seen in the larger margin group (20.9% vs 6.0%, p = 0.028). On multivariate analyses, margin size > 1.0 mm was associated with an increased risk for symptomatic radionecrosis (HR 3.07, 95% CI 1.13–8.34; p = 0.028), while multifraction SRS emerged as a protective factor for symptomatic radionecrosis (HR 0.13, 95% CI 0.02–0.76; p = 0.023).

CONCLUSIONS

Expanding the PTV margin beyond 1.0 mm is not associated with improved local recurrence but appears to increase the risk of symptomatic radionecrosis after postoperative SRS.