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Erratum

Orbital tumors treated using transcranial approaches: surgical technique and neuroophthalmogical results in 41 patients

Erez Nossek

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Rachel Grossman, Erez Nossek, Nir Shimony, Michal Raz and Zvi Ram

The authors report a case of primary CNS lymphoma located in the floor of the fourth ventricle that showed intense fluorescence after preoperative administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid. The authors believe that this is the first demonstration of a 5-aminolevulinic acid–induced fluorescence pattern in primary CNS lymphoma.

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Erez Nossek, David J. Chalif, Shamik Chakraborty, Kim Lombardo, Karen S. Black and Avi Setton

OBJECT

The use of the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) as a sole endovascular modality has been described for the treatment of brain aneurysms. The benefit of using coils concurrently with a limited number of PEDs is not well documented. The authors describe their experience with this technique as well as their midterm clinical and angiographic results.

METHODS

This is a retrospective review of patients treated between 2011 and 2014. The authors placed a minimal number of PEDs with the addition of coils using a “jailed” microcatheter technique. A partially dense coil mass was obtained. Immediate and midterm clinical and angiographic results are reviewed.

RESULTS

The authors treated 27 patients harboring 28 aneurysms using this technique. The mean aneurysm size was 11.9 mm, and the mean neck size was 5.4 mm. A mean of 1.48 PEDs were placed per patient, and a mean of 1.33 PEDs per aneurysm were placed. The Raymond score immediately after PED placement was 2 or 3 in 82.1% of the patients.

There were no intraprocedural or postprocedural complications. All PEDs were successfully deployed. No clinical or technical adverse effects related to the coil mass were observed. There were no clinical or radiographic signs of ischemia in this group. At follow-up imaging, complete aneurysm occlusion was demonstrated on the first MR angiogram (3–5 months) in all patients who reached this milestone. Follow-up digital subtraction angiography (5–13 months) confirmed complete occlusion in all patients who reached this milestone. All patients maintained their baseline clinical status.

CONCLUSIONS

The deployment of PEDs with concurrent partially dense coiling is safe and efficacious. This technique achieved early complete occlusion and endovascular reconstruction of the parent vessel, without inducing mass effect. Favorable midterm clinical results were observed in all patients.

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Keren Rosenberg, Erez Nossek, Ronit Liebling, Itzhak Fried, Irit Shapira-Lichter, Talma Hendler and Zvi Ram

Object

Resection of lesions involving the supplementary motor area (SMA) may result in immediate postoperative motor and speech deficits that are reversible in most cases. In the present study the authors aimed to determine the critical involvement of SMA in the lesioned and healthy hemispheres in this functional recovery. They hypothesized that compensatory mechanisms take place following surgery in the SMA, and that these mechanisms can involve either the lesioned or the non-lesioned hemisphere. In addition, they hypothesized that a correlation will be present between the functional MR imaging (fMR) imaging–related activation in the SMA and the occurrence of a functional deficit during intraoperative cortical stimulation.

Methods

Twenty-six patients scheduled for resection of space-occupying lesions involving, or in the vicinity of, the SMA were recruited. Patients underwent an fMR imaging examination that included finger-tapping and verb-generation tests to assess for motor and language functions. Intraoperatively direct cortical stimulation (DCS) of the SMA region was performed while patients were monitored for language and motor functions using tests similar to those used for the fMR imaging. Task dysfunction during DCS assessed the critical involvement of the SMA in the tested functions. Neurological evaluations were performed prior to surgery and at 3 time points within a month following surgery. A region of interest–based approach was used to evaluate fMR imaging blood oxygen level–dependent activation level and asymmetry in the SMA. These measurements were later compared with the intraoperative DCS and neurological findings.

Results

Functional MR imaging showed greater activation and dominance of the SMA in the lesioned hemisphere in patients who exhibited no motor or language dysfunction during DCS. In addition, patients with the highest activation of the SMA in the lesioned hemisphere for language and motor tests showed stronger coupling of this region with ipsilateral motor and language networks. In contrast, activation in the nonlesioned hemisphere did not correspond with DCS results.

Conclusions

The authors' findings demonstrate the necessity of activation in the vicinity of the lesioned SMA for functional compensation in motor and language tasks. It is possible that more effective functional coupling of the SMA with motor and language areas in the same hemisphere prevents dysfunctions following surgical intervention. Importantly, fMR imaging activation in the unaffected SMA was not sufficient for development of functional compensation and, if anything, indicated decompensation.

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Nevo Margalit, Haim Ezer, Dan M. Fliss, Elvira Naftaliev, Erez Nossek and Anat Kesler

Object

Orbital tumors can be divided schematically into primary lesions, originating from the orbit itself, and secondary lesions, extending to the orbit from neighboring structures. These tumors are variable in their biological nature and in their location. The authors evaluate 41 cases of benign and malignant tumors involving the orbit and discuss the surgical challenge, which involves tumor removal, preserving visual function and cosmetic reconstruction.

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective analysis of a series of all cases involving patients who underwent surgery for treatment of orbital tumors in their hospital between December 2003 and December 2006. Data were collected from the patients' files in the hospital's outpatient clinic, operative notes, and pre- and postoperative imaging studies.

Results

The authors identified 41 patients who met the inclusion criteria (age range 14–82 years, mean 42.2 years, standard deviation 22.4 years). The most common presenting symptoms were proptosis and/or partial ptosis (11 cases [27%]) and headache (7 cases [17%]). In 5 (12%) cases, the tumors were primary intraorbital lesions, and in 34 cases (83%) they were secondary. Two patients had metastases to the orbit. The most common lesion types were meningioma (10 cases [24%]) and osteoma (7 cases [17%]). In 24 cases a midline approach through a frontal craniotomy or a subcranial approach was used; in 13 a lateral approach was used; and in 4 a biopsy procedure was performed. Maxillectomy through a Weber–Ferguson approach or a facial degloving approach was added in 5 cases to complete tumor removal. Duration of follow-up was 1–38 months (mean 20 months). None of the patients died as a result of the procedure, and there were relatively few complications. Excluding the patients who underwent orbital exenteration, none of the patients had visual deterioration following surgery, and most had no change in their visual condition. Two patients had temporary diplopia, 1 had a cerebrospinal fluid leak, and 1 had enophthalmos following removal of an orbital osteosarcoma.

Conclusions

Orbital tumors can be treated safely using transcranial approaches in many cases. Preoperative imaging can accurately define the compartments involved and the surgical approach needed for tumor removal. A multidisciplinary team of surgeons facilitates optimal tumor removal and skull base sealing as well as good cosmetic results.

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Tal Shahar, Akiva Korn, Gal Barkay, Tali Biron, Amir Hadanny, Tomer Gazit, Erez Nossek, Margaret Ekstein, Anat Kesler and Zvi Ram

OBJECTIVE

Resection of intraaxial tumors adjacent to the optic radiation (OR) may be associated with postoperative visual field (VF) deficits. Intraoperative navigation using MRI-based tractography and electrophysiological monitoring of the visual pathways may allow maximal resection while preserving visual function. In this study, the authors evaluated the value of visual pathway mapping in a series of patients undergoing awake craniotomy for tumor resection.

METHODS

A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was conducted in 18 patients who underwent an awake craniotomy for resection of intraaxial tumors involving or adjacent to the OR. Preoperative MRI-based tractography was used for intraoperative navigation, and intraoperative acquisition of 3D ultrasonography images was performed for real-time imaging and correction of brain shift. Goggles with light-emitting diodes were used as a standard visual stimulus. Direct cortical visual evoked potential (VEP) recording, subcortical recordings from the OR, and subcortical stimulation of the OR were used intraoperatively to assess visual function and proximity of the lesion to the OR. VFs were assessed pre- and postoperatively.

RESULTS

Baseline cortical VEP recordings were available for 14 patients (77.7%). No association was found between preoperative VF status and baseline presence of cortical VEPs (p = 0.27). Five of the 14 patients (35.7%) who underwent subcortical stimulation of the OR reported seeing phosphenes in the corresponding contralateral VF. There was a positive correlation (r = 0.899, p = 0.04) between the subcortical threshold stimulation intensity (3–11.5 mA) and the distance from the OR. Subcortical recordings from the OR demonstrated a typical VEP waveform in 10 of the 13 evaluated patients (76.9%). These waveforms were present only when recordings were obtained within 10 mm of the OR (p = 0.04). Seven patients (38.9%) had postoperative VF deterioration, and it was associated with a length of < 8 mm between the tumor and the OR (p = 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring of the visual pathways is feasible but may be of limited value in preserving the functional integrity of the posterior visual pathways. Subcortical stimulation of the OR may identify the location of the OR when done in proximity to the pathways, but such proximity may be associated with increased risk of postoperative worsening of the VF deficit.

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Tal Gonen, Rachel Grossman, Razi Sitt, Erez Nossek, Raneen Yanaki, Emanuela Cagnano, Akiva Korn, Daniel Hayat and Zvi Ram

Object

Intraoperative seizures during awake craniotomy may interfere with patients' ability to cooperate throughout the procedure, and it may affect their outcome. The authors have assessed the occurrence of intraoperative seizures during awake craniotomy in regard to tumor location and the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) status of the tumor.

Methods

Data were collected in 137 consecutive patients who underwent awake craniotomy for removal of a brain tumor. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of the incidence of seizures based on the tumor location and its IDH1 mutation status, and then compared the groups for clinical variables and surgical outcome parameters.

Results

Tumor location was strongly associated with the occurrence of intraoperative seizures. Eleven patients (73%) with tumor located in the supplementary motor area (SMA) experienced intraoperative seizures, compared with 17 (13.9%) with tumors in the other three non-SMA brain regions (p < 0.0001). Interestingly, there was no significant association between history of seizures and tumor location (p = 0.44). Most of the patients (63.6%) with tumor in the SMA region harbored an IDH1 mutation compared with those who had tumors in non-SMA regions. Thirty-one of 52 patients (60%) with a preoperative history of seizures had an IDH1 mutation (p = 0.02), and 15 of 22 patients (68.2%) who experienced intraoperative seizures had an IDH1 mutation (p = 0.03). In a multivariate analysis, tumor location was found as a significant predictor of intraoperative seizures (p = 0.002), and a trend toward IDH1 mutation as such a predictor was found as well (p = 0.06). Intraoperative seizures were not associated with worse outcome.

Conclusions

Patients with tumors located in the SMA are more prone to develop intraoperative seizures during awake craniotomy compared with patients who have a tumor in non-SMA frontal areas and other brain regions. The IDH1 mutation was more common in SMA region tumors compared with other brain regions, and may be an additional risk factor for the occurrence of intraoperative seizures.

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Erez Nossek, Idit Matot, Tal Shahar, Ori Barzilai, Yoni Rapoport, Tal Gonen, Gal Sela, Akiva Korn, Daniel Hayat and Zvi Ram

Object

Awake craniotomy for removal of intraaxial tumors within or adjacent to eloquent brain regions is a well-established procedure. However, awake craniotomy failures have not been well characterized. In the present study, the authors aimed to analyze and assess the incidence and causes for failed awake craniotomy.

Methods

The database of awake craniotomies performed at Tel Aviv Medical Center between 2003 and 2010 was reviewed. Awake craniotomy was considered a failure if conversion to general anesthesia was required, or if adequate mapping or monitoring could not have been achieved.

Results

Of 488 patients undergoing awake craniotomy, 424 were identified as having complete medical, operative, and anesthesiology records. The awake craniotomies performed in 27 (6.4%) of these 424 patients were considered failures. The main causes of failure were lack of intraoperative communication with the patient (n = 18 [4.2%]) and/or intraoperative seizures (n = 9 [2.1%]). Preoperative mixed dysphasia (p < 0.001) and treatment with phenytoin (p = 0.0019) were related to failure due to lack of communication. History of seizures (p = 0.03) and treatment with multiple antiepileptic drugs (p = 0.0012) were found to be related to failure due to intraoperative seizures. Compared with the successful awake craniotomy group, a significantly lower rate of gross-total resection was achieved (83% vs 54%, p = 0.008), there was a higher incidence of short-term speech deterioration postoperatively (6.1% vs 23.5%, p = 0.0017) as well as at 3 months postoperatively (2.3% vs 15.4%, p = 0.0002), and the hospitalization period was longer (4.9 ± 6.2 days vs 8.0 ± 10.1 days, p < 0.001). Significantly more major complications occurred in the failure group (4 [14.8%] of 27) than in the successful group (16 [4%] of 397) (p = 0.037).

Conclusions

Failures of awake craniotomy were associated with a lower incidence of gross-total resection and increased postoperative morbidity. The majority of awake craniotomy failures were preventable by adequate patient selection and avoiding side effects of drugs administered during surgery.

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Matthew B. Potts, Maksim Shapiro, Daniel W. Zumofen, Eytan Raz, Erez Nossek, Keith G. DeSousa, Tibor Becske, Howard A. Riina and Peter K. Nelson

OBJECTIVE

The Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) is now a well-established option for the treatment of giant or complex aneurysms, especially those arising from the anterior circulation. Considering the purpose of such treatment is to maintain patency of the parent vessel, postembolization occlusion of the parent artery can be regarded as an untoward outcome. Antiplatelet therapy in the posttreatment period is therefore required to minimize such events. Here, the authors present a series of patients with anterior circulation aneurysms treated with the PED who subsequently experienced parent vessel occlusion (PVO).

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective review of all anterior circulation aneurysms consecutively treated at a single institution with the PED through 2014, identifying those with PVO on follow-up imaging. Aneurysm size and location, number of PEDs used, and follow-up digital subtraction angiography results were recorded. When available, pre- and postembolization platelet function testing results were also recorded.

RESULTS

Among 256 patients with anterior circulation aneurysms treated with the PED, the authors identified 8 who developed PVO after embolization. The mean aneurysm size in this cohort was 22.3 mm, and the number of PEDs used per case ranged from 2 to 10. Six patients were found to have asymptomatic PVO discovered incidentally on routine follow-up imaging between 6 months and 3 years postembolization, 3 of whom had documented “delayed” PVO with prior postembolization angiograms confirming aneurysm occlusion and a patent parent vessel at an earlier time. Two additional patients experienced symptomatic PVO, one of which was associated with early discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy.

CONCLUSIONS

In this large series of anterior circulation aneurysms, the authors report a low incidence of symptomatic PVO, complicating premature discontinuation of postembolization antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy. Beyond the subacute period, asymptomatic PVO was more common, particularly among complex fusiform or very large–necked aneurysms, highlighting an important phenomenon with the use of PED for the treatment of anterior circulation aneurysms, and suggesting that extended periods of antiplatelet coverage may be required in select complex aneurysms.

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Tal Shahar, Uri Rozovski, Yuval Shapira, Erez Nossek, Bracha Zelikovich, Joseph Jossiphov, Zvi Ram, Andrew A. Kanner, Tali Siegal, Deborah T. Blumenthal and Iris Lavon

The differential diagnosis of a brain lesion with two discordant pathology reports includes the presence of collision tumor, metaplastic changes, and labeling errors that occurred during the processing of the specimen. The authors present a case in which the first brain biopsy from a 47-year-old patient with a history of heavy smoking was compatible with metastatic small cell carcinoma, and the second biopsy taken during decompression craniotomy 3 weeks later was compatible with WHO Grade IV glioblastoma. Using short tandem repeat (STR) analysis of the two specimens and nontumor-derived patient DNA, the authors found that the two specimens did not belong to the same individual. The authors conclude that allele imbalance or loss of heterozygosity detected by STR analysis is a reliable and valuable diagnostic tool for clarifying discrepancies in discordant pathology reports.