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Johan Pallud and Emmanuel Mandonnet

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Johan Pallud, Emmanuel Mandonnet, and Hugues Duffau

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Hugues Duffau, Peggy Gatignol, Emmanuel Mandonnet, Laurent Capelle, and Luc Taillandier

Object

Despite better knowledge of cortical language organization, its subcortical anatomofunctional connectivity remains poorly understood. The authors used intraoperative subcortical stimulation in awake patients undergoing operation for a glioma in the left dominant hemisphere to map the language pathways and to determine the contribution of such a method to surgical results.

Methods

One hundred fifteen patients harboring a World Health Organization Grade II glioma within language areas underwent operation after induction of local anesthesia, using direct electrical stimulation to perform online cortical and subcortical language mapping throughout the resection.

Results

After detection of cortical language sites, the authors identified 1 or several of the following subcortical language pathways in all patients: 1) arcuate fasciculus, eliciting phonemic paraphasia when stimulated; 2) inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, generating semantic paraphasia when stimulated; 3) subcallosal fasciculus, inducing transcortical motor aphasia during stimulation; 4) frontoparietal phonological loop, eliciting speech apraxia during stimulation; and 5) fibers coming from the ventral premotor cortex, inducing anarthria when stimulated. These structures were preserved, representing the limits of the resection. Despite a transient immediate postoperative worsening, all but 2 patients (98%) returned to baseline or better. On control MR imaging, 83% of resections were total or subtotal.

Conclusions

These results represent the largest experience with human subcortical language mapping ever reported. The use of intraoperative cortical and subcortical stimulation gives a unique opportunity to perform an accurate and reliable real-time anatomofunctional study of language connectivity. Such knowledge of the individual organization of language networks enables practitioners to optimize the benefit-to-risk ratio of surgery for Grade II glioma within the left dominant hemisphere.

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Mitchel S. Berger

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Arianna Fava, Paolo di Russo, Valentina Tardivo, Thibault Passeri, Breno Câmara, Nicolas Penet, Rosaria Abbritti, Lorenzo Giammattei, Hamid Mammar, Anne Laure Bernat, Emmanuel Mandonnet, and Sébastien Froelich

OBJECTIVE

Craniocervical junction (CCJ) chordomas are a neurosurgical challenge because of their deep localization, lateral extension, bone destruction, and tight relationship with the vertebral artery and lower cranial nerves. In this study, the authors present their surgical experience with the endoscope-assisted far-lateral transcondylar approach (EA-FLTA) for the treatment of CCJ chordomas, highlighting the advantages of this corridor and the integration of the endoscope to reach the anterior aspect and contralateral side of the CCJ and the possibility of performing occipitocervical fusion (OCF) during the same stage of surgery.

METHODS

Nine consecutive cases of CCJ chordomas treated with the EA-FLTA between 2013 and 2020 were retrospectively reviewed. Preoperative characteristics, surgical technique, postoperative results, and clinical outcome were analyzed. A cadaveric dissection was also performed to clarify the anatomical landmarks.

RESULTS

The male/female ratio was 1.25, and the median age was 36 years (range 14–53 years). In 6 patients (66.7%), the lesion showed a bilateral extension, and 7 patients (77.8%) had an intradural extension. The vertebral artery was encased in 5 patients. Gross-total resection was achieved in 5 patients (55.6%), near-total resection in 3 (33.3%), and subtotal resection 1 (11.1%). In 5 cases, the OCF was performed in the same stage after tumor removal. Neither approach-related complications nor complications related to tumor resection occurred. During follow-up (median 18 months, range 5–48 months), 1 patient, who had already undergone treatment and radiotherapy at another institution and had an aggressive tumor (Ki-67 index of 20%), showed tumor recurrence at 12 months.

CONCLUSIONS

The EA-FLTA provides a safe and effective corridor to resect extensive and complex CCJ chordomas, allowing the surgeon to reach the anterior, lateral, and posterior portions of the tumor, and to treat CCJ instability in a single stage.

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Laurent Capelle, Denys Fontaine, Emmanuel Mandonnet, Luc Taillandier, Jean Louis Golmard, Luc Bauchet, Johan Pallud, Philippe Peruzzi, Marie Hélène Baron, Michèle Kujas, Jacques Guyotat, Remi Guillevin, Marc Frenay, Sophie Taillibert, Philippe Colin, Valérie Rigau, Fanny Vandenbos, Catherine Pinelli, Hugues Duffau, and for the French Réseau d'Étude des Gliomes (REG)

Object

The spontaneous prognostic factors and optimal therapeutic strategy for WHO Grade II gliomas (GIIGs) have yet to be unanimously defined. Specifically, the role of resection is still debated, most notably because the actual amount of resection has seldom been assessed.

Methods

Cases of GIIGs treated before December 2007 were extracted from a multicenter database retrospectively collected since January 1985 and prospectively collected since 1996. Inclusion criteria were a patient age ≥ 18 years at diagnosis, histological diagnosis of WHO GIIG, and MRI evaluation of tumor volume at diagnosis and after initial surgery. One thousand ninety-seven lesions were included in the analysis. The mean follow-up was 7.4 years since radiological diagnosis. Factors significant in a univariate analysis (with a p value ≤ 0.1) were included in the multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression model analysis.

Results

At the time of radiological diagnosis, independent spontaneous factors of a poor prognosis were an age ≥ 55 years, an impaired functional status, a tumor location in a nonfrontal area, and, most of all, a larger tumor size. When the study starting point was set at the time of first treatment, independent favorable prognostic factors were limited to a smaller tumor size, an epileptic symptomatology, and a greater extent of resection.

Conclusions

This large series with its volumetric assessment refines the prognostic value of previously stressed clinical and radiological parameters and highlights the importance of tumor size and location. The results support additional arguments in favor of the predominant role of resection, in accordance with recently reported experiences.