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Edison P. Valle-Giler, Elias Atallah, Stavropoula Tjoumakaris, Robert H. Rosenwasser and Pascal Jabbour

The Pipeline embolization device (PED) has become a very important tool in the treatment of nonruptured cerebral aneurysms. However, a patient’s difficult anatomy or vascular stenosis may affect the device delivery. The purpose of this article was to describe an alternate technique for PED deployment when ipsilateral anatomy is not amenable for catheter navigation.

A 44-year-old woman with a symptomatic 6-mm right superior hypophyseal artery aneurysm and a known history of right internal carotid artery dissection presented for PED treatment of her aneurysm. An angiogram showed persistence of the arterial dissection with luminal stenosis after 6 months of dual antiplatelet treatment. The contralateral internal carotid artery was catheterized and the PED was deployed via a transcirculation approach, using the anterior communicating artery. Transcirculation deployment of a PED is a viable option when ipsilateral anatomy is difficult or contraindicated for this treatment.

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Edison P. Valle, Rafael J. Tamargo and Philippe Gailloud

The cases of 2 children with true aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAHs) and initial false-negative angiograms are reported. In both cases, the initial angiogram was of adequate technical quality and included the projections on which aneurysms were later documented. There was no significant vasospasm at the time of initial angiography; therefore, transient aneurysm sac thrombosis was the most likely explanation for the initial false-negative studies. It is particularly interesting to note that 1 of the 2 patients had a pattern of hemorrhage compatible with the most limited definition of a perimesencephalic SAH, that is, a small prepontine cistern hemorrhage. If a second angiogram had been deemed unnecessary based on that criterion alone, a ruptured basilar tip aneurysm would have escaped detection and treatment.

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Jason H. Maley, Jorge E. Alvernia, Edison P. Valle and Donald Richardson

Intermittent explosive disorder (IED) is characterized by a dysfunction in the greater limbic system leading an individual to experience sudden aggressive behavior with little or no environmental perturbation. This report describes a procedure for the treatment of IED in a 19-year-old woman with a history of IED, having had episodes of severe violent attacks against family, dating to early childhood. Due to the severity and intractability of the illness, deep brain stimulation was performed, targeting the orbitofrontal projections to the hypothalamus. The patient's history and the procedure, management, and rationale are described in detail.

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Badih Daou, Edison P. Valle-Giler, Nohra Chalouhi, Robert M. Starke, Stavropoula Tjoumakaris, David Hasan, Robert H. Rosenwasser, Ryan Hebert and Pascal Jabbour

OBJECTIVE

The Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) has become an effective treatment strategy for some cerebral aneurysms. Concerns regarding the patency of branch arteries have been raised. The objective of this study was to assess the patency of the posterior communicating artery (PCoA) following treatment of PCoA aneurysms using the PED.

METHODS

All patients with PCoA aneurysms treated with the PED who had angiographic follow-up were retrospectively identified. The patency of the PCoA at follow-up was evaluated by 2 authors who were not involved in the intervention. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify factors associated with the following: 1) PCoA patency versus no or diminished flow, and 2) PCoA patency and diminished flow versus PCoA occlusion.

RESULTS

Thirty patients with an angiographic follow-up of 6 months were included. Aneurysm obliteration was achieved in 25 patients (83.3%). The PCoA was patent in 7 patients (23.3%), had diminished flow in 7 patients (23.3%), and was occluded in 16 patients (53.3%). In the univariate analysis of outcome, there was a trend for aneurysms with incomplete occlusion, aneurysms not previously treated, those with presence of a fetal PCoA, and those with an artery coming from the aneurysm to have higher odds of the PCoA remaining patent. In univariate and multivariate analyses of factors associated with outcome, fetal PCoA and presence of an artery coming from the aneurysm were associated with the PCoA remaining open with or without diminished flow. No patients had symptoms related to PCoA occlusion.

CONCLUSIONS

Occlusion and diminished flow through the PCoA is common following PED treatment of PCoA aneurysms. However, it is clinically insignificant in most cases.