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Douglas A. Hardesty, Matthew R. Sanborn, Whitney E. Parker, and Phillip B. Storm

Object

The incidence of, and risk factors for, perioperative seizures and the need for perioperative antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in previously seizure-free children with brain tumors remains unclear. The authors have undertaken a review of previously seizure-free pediatric patients with brain tumors undergoing resection to identify the incidence of seizures in the perioperative period, and to characterize risk factors for perioperative seizures in this population.

Methods

A retrospective review was conducted of all patients between 0 and 19 years of age without prior seizures who underwent intracranial tumor resection at the authors' institution between January 2005 and December 2009.

Results

Of the 223 patients undergoing 229 operations, 7.4% experienced at least 1 clinical seizure during the surgical admission. Over half of all tumors were supratentorial. Only 4.4% of patients received prophylactic AEDs. Independent factors associated with perioperative seizures included supratentorial tumor, age < 2 years, and hyponatremia due to syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone or cerebral salt wasting. Tumor type, lobe affected, operative blood loss, and length of surgery were not independently associated with seizure incidence.

Conclusions

Perioperative seizures in previously seizure-free children undergoing resection of brain tumors are associated with supratentorial tumor location, age < 2 years, and postoperative hyponatremia. Perioperative seizures are not associated with tumor pathology, tumor size, or frontotemporal location. Due to the low incidence of seizures in this series in patients more than 2 years old with normal serum sodium, the authors recommend that pediatric patients with brain tumors not routinely receive perioperative prophylactic AEDs. However, the role for prophylaxis in patients younger than 2 years of age deserves further study.

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Harjot Thind, Douglas A. Hardesty, Joseph M. Zabramski, Robert F. Spetzler, and Peter Nakaji

OBJECT

The successful treatment of an intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) requires complete obliteration of blood flow through the fistulous point. Surgical ligation is often used along with endovascular techniques. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) can be used to confirm fistula obliteration; however, this technique can be cumbersome intraoperatively and difficult to correlate anatomically with the surgical field. Near-infrared indocyanine green (ICG) videoangiography has been described as a complementary tool for this purpose.

METHODS

The authors examined intracranial dAVF cases in which microscope-integrated intraoperative ICG videoangiography was used to identify and/or confirm obliteration of the dAVF during surgery. Retrospective evaluation of all intracranial dAVF cases treated with surgical ligation over a 10-year period at the Barrow Neurological Institute (n = 47) revealed 28 cases in which ICG videoangiography was used. The results were compared with findings on preoperative and intraoperative or postoperative DSA.

RESULTS

ICG videoangiography successfully confirmed the fistulous point intraoperatively in 96% (22/23) of the cases. It also revealed complete obliteration of fistulas, comparable to intraoperative or postoperative DSA, in 91% (21/23) of the cases. The false-negative rate of ICG was 8.7% (2/23), which is similar to the false-negative rate of intraoperative DSA alone (10.5% [2/19]).

CONCLUSIONS

Microscope-based ICG videoangiography provides real-time information about the intraoperative anatomy of dAVFs. In addition, it can confirm complete obliteration of a fistula. This technique may be useful during dAVF surgery as an independent form of angiography or as an adjunct to intraoperative or postoperative DSA.

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Joel A. Bauman, Douglas A. Hardesty, Gregory G. Heuer, and Phillip B. Storm

An alternative method of bone grafting for pediatric posterior cervical and occipitocervical fixation is presented in detail. Full-thickness autografts from small craniectomies of the occipital bone are used to augment posterior segmental fusion in pediatric patients. Twelve patients have been treated successfully without bone graft donor site complications. The technical differences from previously reported uses of calvarial autograft in spine fusion are reviewed.

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Michael A. Mooney, Douglas A. Hardesty, John P. Sheehy, Robert Bird, Kristina Chapple, William L. White, and Andrew S. Little

OBJECTIVE

The goal of this study was to determine the interrater and intrarater reliability of the Knosp grading scale for predicting pituitary adenoma cavernous sinus (CS) involvement.

METHODS

Six independent raters (3 neurosurgery residents, 2 pituitary surgeons, and 1 neuroradiologist) participated in the study. Each rater scored 50 unique pituitary MRI scans (with contrast) of biopsy-proven pituitary adenoma. Reliabilities for the full scale were determined 3 ways: 1) using all 50 scans, 2) using scans with midrange scores versus end scores, and 3) using a dichotomized scale that reflects common clinical practice. The performance of resident raters was compared with that of faculty raters to assess the influence of training level on reliability.

RESULTS

Overall, the interrater reliability of the Knosp scale was “strong” (0.73, 95% CI 0.56–0.84). However, the percent agreement for all 6 reviewers was only 10% (26% for faculty members, 30% for residents). The reliability of the middle scores (i.e., average rated Knosp Grades 1 and 2) was “very weak” (0.18, 95% CI −0.27 to 0.56) and the percent agreement for all reviewers was only 5%. When the scale was dichotomized into tumors unlikely to have intraoperative CS involvement (Grades 0, 1, and 2) and those likely to have CS involvement (Grades 3 and 4), the reliability was “strong” (0.60, 95% CI 0.39–0.75) and the percent agreement for all raters improved to 60%. There was no significant difference in reliability between residents and faculty (residents 0.72, 95% CI 0.55–0.83 vs faculty 0.73, 95% CI 0.56–0.84). Intrarater reliability was moderate to strong and increased with the level of experience.

CONCLUSIONS

Although these findings suggest that the Knosp grading scale has acceptable interrater reliability overall, it raises important questions about the “very weak” reliability of the scale's middle grades. By dichotomizing the scale into clinically useful groups, the authors were able to address the poor reliability and percent agreement of the intermediate grades and to isolate the most important grades for use in surgical decision making (Grades 3 and 4). Authors of future pituitary surgery studies should consider reporting Knosp grades as dichotomized results rather than as the full scale to optimize the reliability of the scale.

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Rafael Martínez-Pérez, Thiago Albonette-Felicio, Douglas A. Hardesty, and Daniel M. Prevedello

OBJECTIVE

Keyhole approaches, namely the minipterional approach (MPTa) and the supraorbital approach (SOa), are alternatives to the standard pterional approach to treat lesions located in the anterior and middle cranial fossae. Despite their increasing popularity and acceptance, the indications and limitations of these approaches require further assessment. The purpose of the present study was to determine the differences in the area of surgical exposure and surgical maneuverability provided by the MPTa and SOa.

METHODS

The areas of surgical exposure afforded by the MPTa and SOa were analyzed in 12 sides of cadaver heads by using a microscope and a neuronavigation system. The area of exposure of the region of interest and surgical freedom (maneuverability) of each approach were calculated.

RESULTS

The area of exposure was significantly larger in the MPTa than in the SOa (1250 ± 223 mm2 vs 939 ± 139 mm2, p = 0.002). The MPTa provided larger areas of exposure in the ipsilateral and midline compartments, whereas there was no significant difference in the area of exposure in the contralateral compartment. All targets in the anterior circulation had significantly larger areas of surgical freedom when treated via the MPTa versus the SOa.

CONCLUSIONS

The MPTa provides greater surgical exposure and better maneuverability than that offered by the SOa. The SOa may be advantageous as a direct corridor for treating lesions located in the contralateral side or in the anterior cranial fossa, but the surgical exposure provided in the midline region is inferior to that exposed by the MPTa.

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Ian F. Dunn and E. Antonio Chiocca

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Robert T. Wicks, Xiaochun Zhao, Douglas A. Hardesty, Brandon D. Liebelt, and Peter Nakaji

Ethmoidal dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) have a near-universal association with cortical venous drainage and a malignant clinical course. Endovascular treatment options are often limited due to the high frequency of ophthalmic artery ethmoidal supply. A 64-year-old gentleman presented with syncope and was found to have a right ethmoidal DAVF. Rather than the traditional bicoronal craniotomy, an endoscope-assisted mini-pterional approach for clip ligation is demonstrated. The mini-pterional craniotomy allows a minimally invasive approach to ethmoidal DAVF via a lateral trajectory. The endoscope can help achieve full visualization in the narrow corridor.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/ZroXp-T35DI.

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Daniel C. Kreatsoulas, Varun S. Shah, Bradley A. Otto, Ricardo L. Carrau, Daniel M. Prevedello, and Douglas A. Hardesty

OBJECTIVE

Spontaneous CSF leaks are rare, their diagnosis is often delayed, and they can precipitate meningitis. Craniotomy is the historical “gold standard” repair for these leaks. An endonasal endoscopic approach (EEA) offers potentially less invasiveness and lower surgical morbidity than a traditional craniotomy but must yield the same surgical success. A paucity of data exists studying EEA as the primary management for spontaneous CSF leaks.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed patients undergoing spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea repair at their institution from July 2010 to August 2018. Standardized management includes EEA as first-line treatment, and lumbar puncture (LP) performed 24–48 hours postoperatively. If opening pressure on LP is elevated, CSF diversion or acetazolamide therapy is used as needed. Perioperative lumbar drains are not used.

RESULTS

Of 46 patients identified, the most common CSF rhinorrhea etiology was encephalocele (28/46, 60.9%), and the most common location was cribriform/ethmoid (26/46, 56.5%). Forty-three patients underwent EEA alone, and 3 underwent a simultaneous EEA/craniotomy. The most common repair strategy was nasoseptal or other pedicled flaps (18/46, 39.1%). Postoperatively, 15 patients (32.6%) received CSF diversion due to elevated ICP, with BMI > 40 kg/m2 being a significant risk factor (odds ratio 4.35, p = 0.033) for postrepair shunt placement. Twelve patients received acetazolamide therapy for treatment of mildly elevated pressures. The average opening pressure of the shunted group was 36 cm H2O and the average for the acetazolamide-only group was 26 cm H2O. Two patients underwent CSF leak repair revision, one because of progressive fungal sinusitis and the other because of recurrent CSF leak. The mean follow-up duration was 15 months.

CONCLUSIONS

The paradigm of EEA repair of spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea with postoperative LP to identify undiagnosed idiopathic intracranial hypertension appears to be safe and effective. In the authors’ cohort, morbid obesity was statistically associated with the need for postoperative CSF diversion. This has implications for future surgical treatment as obesity levels continue to rise worldwide.

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Daniel C. Kreatsoulas, Varun S. Shah, Bradley A. Otto, Ricardo L. Carrau, Daniel M. Prevedello, and Douglas A. Hardesty

OBJECTIVE

Spontaneous CSF leaks are rare, their diagnosis is often delayed, and they can precipitate meningitis. Craniotomy is the historical “gold standard” repair for these leaks. An endonasal endoscopic approach (EEA) offers potentially less invasiveness and lower surgical morbidity than a traditional craniotomy but must yield the same surgical success. A paucity of data exists studying EEA as the primary management for spontaneous CSF leaks.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed patients undergoing spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea repair at their institution from July 2010 to August 2018. Standardized management includes EEA as first-line treatment, and lumbar puncture (LP) performed 24–48 hours postoperatively. If opening pressure on LP is elevated, CSF diversion or acetazolamide therapy is used as needed. Perioperative lumbar drains are not used.

RESULTS

Of 46 patients identified, the most common CSF rhinorrhea etiology was encephalocele (28/46, 60.9%), and the most common location was cribriform/ethmoid (26/46, 56.5%). Forty-three patients underwent EEA alone, and 3 underwent a simultaneous EEA/craniotomy. The most common repair strategy was nasoseptal or other pedicled flaps (18/46, 39.1%). Postoperatively, 15 patients (32.6%) received CSF diversion due to elevated ICP, with BMI > 40 kg/m2 being a significant risk factor (odds ratio 4.35, p = 0.033) for postrepair shunt placement. Twelve patients received acetazolamide therapy for treatment of mildly elevated pressures. The average opening pressure of the shunted group was 36 cm H2O and the average for the acetazolamide-only group was 26 cm H2O. Two patients underwent CSF leak repair revision, one because of progressive fungal sinusitis and the other because of recurrent CSF leak. The mean follow-up duration was 15 months.

CONCLUSIONS

The paradigm of EEA repair of spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea with postoperative LP to identify undiagnosed idiopathic intracranial hypertension appears to be safe and effective. In the authors’ cohort, morbid obesity was statistically associated with the need for postoperative CSF diversion. This has implications for future surgical treatment as obesity levels continue to rise worldwide.

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Douglas A. Hardesty, Wyatt Ramey, Mohammad Afrasiabi, Brian Beck, Omar Gonzalez, Ana Moran, and Peter Nakaji

Object

Coccidioidomycosis is a common fungal infection in the southwestern US. Hydrocephalus is a serious complication of cranial coccidioidomycosis, and the surgical management of coccidioidomycosis-related hydrocephalus has unique challenges. The authors reviewed their institutional experience with hydrocephalus in the setting of coccidioidomycosis.

Methods

The authors retrospectively identified 44 patients diagnosed with coccidioidomycosis-related hydrocephalus at their institution since 1990, who underwent a total of 99 shunting procedures. The authors examined patient demographics, type of shunt and valve used, pressure settings, failure rates, medical treatment, ventricular response to shunting, and other variables.

Results

The majority of patients were young (average age 37 years) men (male/female ratio 28:16) with a mean follow-up of 63 months. Patients of Asian and African descent were overrepresented in the cohort compared with regional demographic data. The overall shunt failure rate during follow-up was 50%, and the average number of revisions required if the shunt failed was 2.5 (range 1–8). Low to moderate draining pressures (mean 88 mm H2O) were used in this cohort. Fourteen patients received intrathecal antifungals, and a trend of initiating intrathecal therapy after need for a shunt revision was observed (p = 0.051). The majority of shunt failures (81%) were due to mechanical blockages in the drainage system. Most patients (59%) had at least partial persistent postoperative ventriculomegaly despite successful CSF diversion. Four patients (9%) died due to coccidioidomycosis during the follow-up period.

Conclusions

Coccidioidomycosis-related hydrocephalus more often affected young males in the study's cohort, especially those of African and Asian descent. Despite the best medical therapy, there was a high rate of shunt failure due to clogged catheters or valves due to the underlying disease process. Many patients continued to have ventriculomegaly even with adequate CSF diversion. The morbidity and mortality of this chronic disease process must be recognized by the treatment team, and patients should be appropriately counseled.